Category Archives: Billy Holiday

OH, WE ALL LOVE TO BE BESIDE THE SEASIDE

ocean_surfaceIf they can have Xmas in July then I reckon I can do a show about the sea in winter. And I did. It was never going to be the kind of breezy show I would do if it was summer,  because, for me anyway, at this time of the year the ocean appears even more immense and overwhelming. Many of the songs in this week’s playlist reflected that.

Our magnificent opening track by the O’Jays, SHIP AHOY, was a perfect example. It’s introduced by the creak of timbers and the crack of slave-owners whips and is an angry tour de force that presents the ocean as a partner in crime.

bencombi-largeAnd while there were other serious songs in the  line-up, there were plenty of  frivolous and joyful tunes as well. And nothing could be more joyful than the sound of the ukulele: It was fantastic to have some live music in the show today as Ben, Renee and Azo from the group Blue Hulas took over the studio for a segment. They are the Northern Rivers original, (and, as far as I know, only), Hawaiian style band and their cruisy, island style music – complete with ukulele – was just right for this week’s theme.

flocks8The Beach Boys recorded a version of UNDER THE BOARDWALK, but it was the Drifters original version that I chose to play this week and gave some time to the Beach Boys for SAIL ON SAILOR, which is quite a serious song that uses the sea as a metaphor for life. Another serious song about the ocean is reggae star  Fred Locks’  BLACK STAR LINER. The title refers to the shipping line that was used to transport black Americans to Africa as part of the Back-to-Africa movement of the 19th century.

Some light relief came from Bobby Darin’s  hit from 1959, BEYOND THE SEA. I tried unsuccessfully to get a copy of the original version for the show: LA MER by French singer Charles Trenet. I’ll track this down, hopefully, and play in a future show.

A big welcome back to Roy Orbison with one of his best, LEAH. Check out this clip from the DVD Black & White Night where Roy is supported by Jackson Browne, T Bone Burnett, Elvis Costello, k.d.Lang, Bonnie Raitt, J.D. Souther, Bruce Springsteen, Tom Waits and Jennifer Warnes. Nice group of friends!

SEVEN SEAS OF RHYE from Queen was worth including just for its ending: ‘We all like to be beside the Seaside’. Other personal favourites that I played included LIGHTHOUSE from The Waifs and FROM THE SEA by Eskimo Joe. Talking of favourites: I had to include the Marvelettes with TOO MANY FISH IN THE SEA and the gorgeous Blossom Dearie singing her version of BETWEEN THE DEVIL AND THE DEEP BLUE SEA

How’s this for a diverse three in a row: An evocative piece of bubblegum from Aqua with WE BELONG TO THE SEA, a little reggae with ON THE BEACH IN HAWAI’I from Ziggy Marley and Led Zeppelin’s DOWN BY THE SEASIDE from their 1975 album Physical Graffiti. Whew. Here’s the beautiful lead singer of Aqua, Lene Nystrom Rasted, in the weird but wonderful video clip for WE BELONG TO THE SEA:

A request from Vanessa followed: Johnny Cash with SEA OF HEARTBREAK and I chose to follow that with Jenny Lewis singing BLACK SAND. For a little change of pace we played The Presets with GIRL AND THE SEA followed by Panic At The Disco’s BEHIND THE SEA. And then it was time for I’M THE OCEAN from the album Mirror Ball by Neil Young and featuring Pearl Jam.

ramones_-_ramones_a-ramonesJason Mraz’s live rendition of  WALK ON THE OCEAN was followed by the one and only Billy Holiday asking us HOW DEEP IS THE OCEAN? And then the Ramones contributed ROCKAWAY BEACH. I can’t quite get my head around the Ramones singing about the beach, but what the hell do I know – it was the highest charting single of their career. Go figure.

We finished the show with Getaway Plan’s WHERE THE CITY MEETS THE SEA and the wonderful Cat Power with SEA OF LOVE.  

Next week, I’m celebrating the SPLENDOUR IN THE GRASS Music Festival being held here in Byron Bay. The show’s theme will be GRASS – no, not THAT grass – well maybe there will be some songs about THAT grass. And if I can’t find enough songs about grass I’ll move onto trees and flowers. I’d love to hear from you with your suggestions. 

Here’s this week’s playlist on the SEA:

Ship Ahoy (2008 Single Version) 4:12 The O’jays The Essential O’Jays R&B/Soul 1
Peaceful Ocean Surf (with seagulls) 2:51 SLEEPYTIME FX 3
Under The Boardwalk 2:44 The Drifters The Legacy Continues R&B 4
Sail on Sailor 3:17 The Beach Boys The Departed Soundtrack Pop 1
Beyond The Sea 2:56 Bobby Darin That’s All Easy Listening 1
Black Star Liner 3:55 Fred Locks Reggae 3
Leah 2:41 Roy Orbison The Essential Roy Orbison (Disc 1) Country/Rock Ballad 21
A Salty Dog 4:36 Procol Harum A Salty Dog Rock 1
A Drop In The Ocean 1:58 Moloko Things To Make And Do Electronic 1
Seven seas of rhye 2:47 Queen Queen II Rock 7
Lighthouse 3:18 The Waifs Triple J Hottest 100, Vol. 11 [Disc 1] Alternative & Punk 2
From the Sea 3:19 Eskimo Joe Triple J’s Hottest 100 Volume 12 [Disc 1] Alternative   9
Too Many Fish In The Sea 2:29 The Marvelettes The Big Chill R&B 8
Between The Devil And The Deep Blue Sea 2:29 Blossom Dearie 15 Jazz 5
We Belong to the Sea 4:17 Aqua Aquarius Pop 7
On the Beach In Hawai’i 3:44 Ziggy Marley Love Is My Religion Reggae 6
Down By The Seaside 5:16 Led Zeppelin Classic Rock 4
Sea Of Heartbreak 2:43 Johnny Cash Country 6
Black Sand 2:54 Jenny Lewis Acid Tongue Alternative 4
Girl And The Sea 4:18 The Presets Girl And The Sea Electronica/Dance 3
Behind The Sea 3:16 Panic At The Disco Pretty Odd Alternative 1
I’m the Ocean 7:06 Neil Young/Pearl Jam Mirror Ball Rock 3
Walk on the Ocean 3:45 Jason Mraz Pop
How Deep Is The Ocean 2:59 Billie Holiday Diva Classics *** Icons *** Jazz/Blues 1
Rockaway Beach 2:05 The Ramones Punk 3
Oceans Away 4:00 The Fray Reason Rock/Pop
Where The City Meets The Sea 3:36 The Getaway Plan Other Voices, Other Rooms Pop
Sea Of Love (2008) [Remastered Version] 2:19 Cat Power Juno Alternative 2

Ship Ahoy (2008 Single Version) – The O’Jays

Under The Boardwalk  – The Drifters

Sail on Sailor – The Beach Boys

Beyond The Sea – Bobby Darin

Black Star Liner – Fred Locks

Leah – Roy Orbison

A Salty Dog – Procol Harum

A Drop In The Ocean – Moloko

Seven Seas Of Rhye – Queen

Lighthouse – The Waifs

From the Sea – Eskimo Joe

Too Many Fish In The Sea – The Marvelettes

Between The Devil And The Deep Blue Sea – Blossom Dearie

We Belong to the Sea – Aqua

On the Beach In Hawai’i  – Ziggy Marley

Down By The Seaside – Led Zeppelin 

Sea Of Heartbreak – Johnny Cash

Black Sand – Jenny Lewis

Girl And The Sea – The Presets

Behind The Sea – Panic At The Disco

I’m the Ocean – Neil Young/Pearl Jam

Walk on the Ocean  – Jason Mraz

How Deep Is The Ocean – Billie Holiday

Rockaway Beach – The Ramones

Oceans Away – The Fray

Where The City Meets The Sea – The Getaway Plan

Sea Of Love  [Remastered Version] – Cat Power

Next week: GRASS (+ trees, flowers).

Listen to Lyn McCarthy on BayFM99.9 Tuesdays 2-4pm (Sydney time).

Also streaming on http://www.bayfm.org.

Tragically, also on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/maccalyn

And Twitter: http://twitter.com/themeparkradio

COMMUNICATION

Our theme this week was Communication – not the deep psychic stuff, but good old fashioned talking, letter writing and, would you believe telegrams (remember them?). I was going to play M.I.A.’s ‘U.R.A.Q.T.’ about texting (“you’re fuckin’ with my man and textin’ all the time…”) but I would have been in a bit of trouble over the expletives, I’m afraid. But I did play some other excellent hip-hop during the show, as well as my usual eclectic mix of rock, pop, blues, jazz and whatever I could find to fit the theme.

We opened the show with the Marvelettes ‘Beachwood 4-5789’. They also recorded the first Motown hit, ‘Please Mr. Postman’, but I had already showcased that one during the Motown Show in January. Besides, ‘Beachwood’ was a great opener for this particular show.

The telephone, whether it be landline or mobile, talking or texting, is still probably the most prominent way we keep in touch. So ‘Hanging Up the Telephone’, sung by Blondie’s Debby Harry was not only pop-punk perfection, but it also opens with the sound of a ringing phone. How good is that? Here’s the video from 1978.

Most letter songs feature absent lovers and none convey the absolute thrill of receiving a long awaited theboxtops-1message better than ‘The Letter’ from the Boxtops. They were known as a major ‘blue-eyed soul’ group during the 60’s. Hard to believe that Alex Chilton, who later formed Big Star and went onto a solo career, was only 16 at the time this was recorded in 1967. The song has been widely covered, most notably by Joe Cocker, but this original version still stands up well. 

Sonny Boy Williamson confimed what I have always knows, (that men are the worst gossips), with his rendition of ‘Don’t Get Me Talking’ while Buddy Guy and Junior Wells contributed ‘A Man of Many Words’ to the Blues segment of the show. 

My Roy Orbison song this week was a great one: ‘Communication Breakdown’. Written by Bill Dees, whose collaboration with Orbison led to a string of successful hits for Monument Records including ‘Communication Breakdown’, ‘Pretty Woman’ and ‘It’s Over’, just to name a few.

And then it was onto an absolutely divine song  by Nina Persson of the Cardigans, ‘Communication’ – “If this is communication , I disconnect”. If only it was that easy. Here’s a video of them doing a live performance in 2007. 

‘Hello Operator’ presented mobile phone refusenik Jack White choosing to use an operator, just like in the good old days. And, as if this was even too newfangled, by the second verse he’s trying to get his message out via canary. Ah ha, rightio then.

Remember when a wedding wasn’t a wedding without the best man reading out several telegrams from absentee friends and family?  I haven’t been to a wedding in ages. Tell me, do they read out emails and texts? Just doesn’t seem the same does it? In ‘Western Union Man’ Jerry Butler gives us a passionate attempt at contacting a girlfriend who won’t answer his phone calls. And Chuck Berry tries to get in touch with people who have phoned him in ‘Memphis Tennessee’. Today we would be asking why the hell aren’t they on Facebook! And then there’s Twitter, but please can we not go there? (really).

you-done-me-wrongJoe Jones seemed to be talking right at me with ‘You Talk Too Much’ and I loved Crowded House’s version of ‘Everybody’s Talkin’.  But how good was Hank Penny’s ‘Sweet Talkin Mama’ recorded in 1938? You can find this terrific bit of country swing on the compilation album You Done Me Wrong (Vintage Country Cheating Songs 1929-1952) distributed by Buzzola. 

There are lots of songs written in the form of letters. One of the best examples of this is Eminem’s ‘Stan’, a masterpiece of escalating desperation that exploits its conceit to its fullest. Sampling Dido’s ‘Thank You’ as the chorus is a piece of genius and the result is a song of chilling elegance that recognises that a letter is always a one-sided conversation.

We followed that with a total contrast – ‘Don’t Explain’ by Billie Holliday and then it was up to Muddy Waters to elevate the mood with ‘Long Distance Call’. There were so many other great songs. I particularly liked Bonnie Raitt’s take on people who talk behind your back. Her advice? Give them ‘Something to Talk About’. Absolutely.

We finished the show with one of my favourite Aretha Franklin numbers: ‘Say A Little Prayer’. This one had me up out of the seat and dancing.  And then a fantastic close from Mr. Cool Jazz himself, Chet Baker, with ‘Every Time We Say Goodbye’. I loved this week’s show and I had a blast. Hope you did too.

Here’s the complete playlist:

Beachwood 4-5789   The Marvellettes

Hanging On The Telephone  – Blondie

Rikki Don’t Lose That Number   Steely Dan

The Letter   The Boxtops

Take A Letter Maria   R.B. Greaves

Please Read The Letter   Alison Krauss/Robert Plant

Don’t Start Me To Talkin’  Sonny Boy Williamson 

A Man Of Many Words  Buddy Guy & Junior Wells

A Little Less Conversation – Elvis Presley            

Communication Breakdown  Roy Orbison

Communication  – The Cardigans

Telephone Line – Electric Light Orchestra

Memphis, Tennessee  Chuck Berry

Hey, Western Union Man –  Jerry Butler

Hello Operator – The White Stripes

You Talk Too Much – Joe Jones

Everybody’s Talkin’  Crowded House

Sweet Talkin’ Mama – Hank Penny

Stan  Eminem & Dido 

Don’t Explain – Billie Holiday

Long Distance Call  Muddy Waters

The Phone Call  The Pretenders

Ring Ring Ring – De La Soul

The Word  The Beatles

I Heard It Through The Grapevine – Paul Weller & Amy Winehouse

What’d I Say – Ray Charles

People Are Talking  Shep & The Limelites

Something to Talk About  Bonnie Raitt

Answering Bell  Ryan Adams

I Say A Little Prayer For You  Aretha Frankin

Every Time We Say Goodbye  Chet Baker

Next week, the theme is Money. Any suggestions for songs for the show, or themes for future shows, are always welcome.

Listen to Lyn at the Theme Park, Tuesdays 2-4pm, Sydney time, on BayFM 99.9 or streaming at http://www.bayfm.org

FEMALE ARTISTS

Throughout the world, since 1975, we have set aside the 8th of March as a day to inspire women and celebrate their achievements. So a radio show airing on March 10, hosted by a pretty feisty woman at that, had a fairly predictable theme begging. I roped in young Zoe to help give the show a wider perspective and we got stuck into presenting some of our favourite female artists. That’s both of us at the end of the show, about to down a well earned shot of caffeine! 1

We opened the show with ‘Sisters Are Doing It For Themselves’, from Aretha Franklin and Annie Lennox. A great feminist anthem, the tune was recorded in 1985 – the year that Zoe was born! Feeling more than a little ancient, I squeezed in my favourite Blues singers – Billie Holiday and Janis Joplin – before handing over the program to Zoe’s first three choices – The Yeah, Yeah, Yeahs, Feist and Robots in Disguise (‘their song La Nuit’ is great – I never thought I could be converted to Electro! Go figure). The video clip is mad, mad, mad…..

When I was putting together my choice for ‘rock chicks’,  Zoe suggested Stevie Nicks (much to my surprise), and who was I to argue? The title of ‘Edge of Seventeen’ was inspired by Tom Petty’s wife Jane who has a strong Southern accent. When Nicks misheard her say ‘the age of seventeen’ as ‘edge of seventeen’ she swore 220px-stevienicks1that she would write a song with the latter as the title. The song’s lyrics came about as a direct result of the grief she felt over the death of both an uncle and John Lennon’s death in the same week of December 1980. The track became the 3rd single from her hit album Bella Donna. It was used in the film ‘School of Rock’ with Jack Black which brought the song, and Stevie, to the attention of a whole new generation.

I also totally approved of Zoe’s next three selections: M.I.A., Soko and Cat Power. M.I.A. is an interesting singer. We all know who she is now because of her Academy Award nomination (with A.R. Rahman)  for  ‘O…Saya’ as Best Song, from the film ‘Slumdog Millionaire’. It didn’t win but now my generation is aware of this precocious young performer. An accomplished visual artist by 2002, she came to prominence in early 2004 through file-sharing of her singles ‘Galang’ and ‘Sunshower’s on the Internet.

But I have to say that Soko is my favourite of this bunch. She may turn out to be a one-hit wonder with her very cute and controversial song ‘I’ll Kill Her’ but if you keep your sense of humour intact, she is a rare and refreshing new talent. Here’s hoping that we hear more of her. She was supposed to have released an album in February of 2009 but her MySpace page, as of January, insists that she has quit singing. Hope not! Check out the video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=25AsfkriHQc

There are so many other great female artists. My selection included the original rock chick – Joan Jett – more blues and r&b with Dinah Washington and Etta James and I even got in some country with Linda Ronstadt singing her version of Roy Orbison’s ‘Blue Bayou’ (and you were wondering how I was going to fit a Roy Orbison song into a show about women! No worries).

Zoe and I both wanted Nina Simone in there and what better song to showcase that amazing voice than ‘I Put A Spell On You’, originally recorded by Screamin’ Jay Hawkins in 1957. And then, of course, there was Amy Winehouse, P.J.Harvey, Shirley Manson, Aretha Franklin and we finished the show with Regina Spektor’s fantastic version of John Lennon’s song ‘Real Love’. This is a song that Spektor contributed to the Amnesty International album to save Darfur. So many of the artists we showcased today are not only strong women artists but they are politically aware and contributing positively to change, not just for women but for all mankind. Respect indeed. Have a look at Regina Spektor at the Bonnaroo Festival in 2007:

Here’s the complete  playlist:

Sisters Are Doin It For Themselves (1985) – Aretha Franklin/Annie Lennox

Billie’s Blues (1936) – Billie Holiday

One Good Man (1969) – Janis Joplin

Rich (2003) – Yeah Yeah Yeahs

Mushaboom (2004) – Feist

La Nuit (2005) – Robots In Disguise

Up The Neck (1980) – The Pretenders/Chrissie Hynde

Edge of Seventeen (1981) –  Stevie Nicks

Bad Reputation (1981) – Joan Jett & the Blackhearts

Paper Planes (2007)  – M.I.A.

I’ll Kill Her (2008) – SoKo

Sea Of Love (2008) [Remastered Version] – Cat Power

Crazy (1962) – Patsy Cline

Jolene (1973) – Dolly Parton

Blue Bayou (1977) – Linda Ronstadt (Roy Orbison cover)

Glory Box  (1994) – Portishead

Bachelorette (1997) – Bjork

Big Long Slidin’ Thing (1954) – Dinah Washington

Tell Mama (1968) – Etta James

Push It (1986) – Salt N Peppa

I Put A Spell On You (1968)  – -Nina Simone

Cupid (2006) – Amy Winehouse

Cry Baby (1971) – Janis Joplin (With Full Tilt Boogie)

C’mon Billy (1995) – PJ Harvey

Stupid Girl (1996) – Garbage (Shirley Manson)

Respect (1967) – Aretha Franklin

Real Love (2007) – Regina Spektor

Next week: Inspired by the this week’s leaping of generations, the theme next Tuesday will be ‘Age’ – young, old and in-between.

Tune into the Theme Park with Lyn  at BayFM 99.9 each Tuesday 2-4pm (Sydney time), or streaming at http://www.bayfm.org.

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