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40 Years of Australian Classic Rock

TURN UP YOUR RADIO, the Master’s Apprentices 1970 declaration that they were now a rock band rather than a teeny bopper sensation, opened our Australia Day show, featuring 40 years of Australian Classic Rock. They quite rightly remind us that rock n roll started a good 15 years before this but there was no way that we were going to fit 55 years of rock into a two hour show, so 1970 seemed a fitting start. Check out this video when Glenn Wheatley was still working the bass guitar:

Daddy Cool’s EAGLE ROCK was recorded in 1971 and went onto become the best selling Australian single of the year. According to songwriter and singer, Ross Wilson, he was inspired by the popular 1920s black dance performed with the arms outstretched and the body rocking from side to side which was called the Eagle Rock. ‘Doing the eagle rock’ is also a metaphor for sexual intercourse.The accompanying promotional video  was put together quickly for $300 and shows the band in some old Melbourne haunts including the Dolphin Café in Clarendon St., South Melbourne and St. Kilda’s Aussie Burger Bar opposite Luna Park as well as live shots from the  1971 Myponga Festival held in South Australia.

In early 1972 Billy Thorpe & The Aztecs released what became their biggest hit, and Thorpe’s signature tune – MOST PEOPLE I KNOW (THINK THAT I’M CRAZY), a song now widely regarded as one of the classics of Australian rock. It was a huge hit for the Aztecs, propelled to the top of charts by the band’s triumphant appearance at the 1972 Sunbury Music Festival. Thorpe himself claimed this as a pivotal moment in the development of Australian music, thanks to the promoters’ decision to feature an all-Australian lineup, rather than relying on imported stars.

And here’s an interview with the late great Billy Thorpe at Sunbury:


After the demise of the Easybeats in 1969, Stevie Wright embarked on a successful solo career. In 1974 he released the epic EVIE, an 11-minute 3-part classic, which to this day remains the longest song ever to reach #1 on any chart in the world.

In 1975 AC/DC released the album T.N.T. with the iconic track IT’S A LONG WAY TO THE TOP (IF YOU WANNA ROCK N ROLL). Written by Angus Young, Malcolm Young and Bon Scott, its notable for combining bagpipes with hard rock, electric guitars, drums and bass. In the mid-part of the song there is a duet between the bagpipes and the electric guitar.

Two very influential Australian bands that were at their best in the mid 70’s were The Angels  and The Saints. The Saints, in particular, are considered to be one of the first and most influential punk rock  groups. By 1975,  The Saints were employing the fast tempos, raucous vocals and “buzzsaw” guitar that characterised early punk rock. With their first single, I’M STRANDED, in late 1976, they became the first punk band outside the United States to release a record, ahead of better-known punk acts like the Sex Pistols and The Clash.  According to Bob Geldof, “Rock music in the seventies was changed by three bands – the Sex Pistols, the Ramones and The Saints”.

Meanwhile Cold Chisel were about to record the song that quite frequently tops those ‘best of’ lists, so it couldn’t be left out of this playlist: KHE SANH. I’ll dedicate this one to Chisel drummer Steve Prestwich who passed away last week at the very young age of 56.

Midnight Oil and Men at Work released songs like THE POWER AND THE PASSION and DOWN UNDER, that have become Aussie anthems.  And then in 1983 The Choirboys came into their own with their first single NEVER GONNA DIE .

By 1984 INXS were breaking out internationally with songs like ORIGINAL SIN and Chrissie Amphlett and The Divinyls proved that a female lead singer could rock it out as well as the boys on songs like PLEASURE & PAIN:

In the mid 80’s Paul Kelly & The Coloured Girls released the Gossip album and proved that there was a place for consummate storytelling in Australian rock music. The hit single from the album was BEFORE TOO LONG:


Hunters & Collectors came together in the early 80’s and were a blend of pub rock and art-funk.  While they attracted a growing fan base both here and overseas, their first real recording success was with the 1989 album Ghost Nation which featured the hit single WHEN THE RIVER RUNS DRY.

The most successful Australian rock band ever, though, continued to be AC/DC. Unfortunately Bon Scott passed away in 1980 but the band bounced back and found a worthy replacement for Scott in Brian Johnson. They kept performing and releasing albums throughout the 80’s and in 1990 they released what was considered their major comeback album The Razors Edge. Here they are performing my favourite track from that album, THUNDERSTRUCK. Go Angus!

Also in the 90’s bands like The Screaming Jets and the Baby Animals were making an impact on the local scene.

Killing Heidi’s first single WEIR was released in August 1999 and reached #6 on the Aria charts (and Platinum sales) by the end of 1999. The band’s debut album Reflector was released in early 2000 and debuted at #1, quickly becoming the fastest-selling album in Australian music history. Here are Ella and Jesse Hooper performing live on TV show The Panel around that time:

Also around that time Powderfinger were emerging as a force to be reckoned with. As was Spiderbait who had a #1 hit with their terrific version of BLACK BETTY in 2004.

But the standout band of the new millenium has to be Silverchair who have received the industry’s flagship gongs, the  Aria Awards, a record 21 times as well as six APRA Awards. They’ve sold over 6 million albums. Here’s STRAIGHT LINES from the 2007 album Young Modern:


We finished the show with some hard rock:  Wolfmother performed here in Byron this week and were amazing. Their song NEW MOON RISING was released in 2009 and its still one of my faves. And the perfect finale followed:  AC/DC with HIGHWAY TO HELL. Here’s Wolfmother performing live on Jools Holland Later in October 2009.

Next week’s show has been suggested by the lovely Ros, and I can’t resist because its a goodie: SONGS ABOUT OTHER MUSICIANS. If you have any suggestions for tracks to include, leave me a message here. Meanwhile here’s the complete playlist from this week:

Turn Up Your Radio (1970) – Masters Apprentices

Eagle Rock (1971) – Daddy Cool

Most People I Know Think That I’m Crazy (1972) – Billy Thorpe and The Aztecs

Evie – Let Your Hair Hang Down, Pt. 1 (1974) – Stevie Wright

It’s A Long Way To The Top (If You Wanna Rock ‘N’ Roll) (1975) – AC/DC

(I’m) Stranded (1976) – The Saints

Am I Ever Gonna See Your Face Again (1977) – The Angels

Khe Sanh (1978) – Cold Chisel

Down Under (1981) – Men At Work

Power And The Passion (1982) – Midnight Oil 2

Never Gonna Die (1983) –  Choirboys

Original Sin (1984) – INXS

Pleasure & Pain (1985) – The Divinyls

Before Too Long – Paul Kelly and The Coloured Girls

When The River Runs Dry (1989) – Hunters and Collectors

Thunderstruck (1990) – AC/DC

Better (1991) – Screaming Jets

One Word (1992) – Baby Animals

My Happiness (2001) – Powderfinger

Weir (2000) – Killing Heidi

Black Betty (2004) – Spiderbait

Straight Lines (2007) – Silverchair

New Moon Rising (2009) – Wolfmother

Highway To Hell (1979) – AC/DC

Next week:  SONGS ABOUT OTHER MUSICIANS

Listen to Lyn McCarthy at the Theme Park on BayFM, Tuesdays 4-6pm, Sydney time
Also streaming via BayFM
Tragically also on Facebook and Twitter
Email me at: lyn.themeparkradio@gmail.com


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MEMORY

Memories can haunt us, no matter how much we want to escape them. There are false memories, conflicting memories of the same event and memories that clash with the reality of the present. Thanks to mass media, memory isn’t something that only belongs to us as individuals. When we see scenes at the cinema or television or on DVDs over and over again, they become part of our collective memory. Even if you’ve never seen the film King Kong you know that there’s a scene where a big gorilla climbs up the Empire State Building with a human girl in his hand. And whenever a comedy show or film features a scene where someone is killed or threatened in a shower most people understand it’s a parody of Psycho. So mass media,  film and television in particular, have contributed hugely to a memory that we share with millions of other people.

Unfortunately, we remember melancholy and pleasure in equal measure. The concept of looking back in hindsight is also a bit complicated. It’s easy to write off youthful idealism as simply being naïve as Stevie Wonder did in our opening number YESTERME, YESTERYOU, YESTERDAY. According to Stevie it was all “a cruel and foolish game we used to play”. Well that’s how he remembers it anyway.

And talking of cruel, I can’t imagine anything worse than getting Alzheimer’s disease and Elvis Costello’s song VERONICA is all about that. It tells the story of an old lady who lives in a nursing home and is gradually losing her memory. It was inspired by Costello’s grandmother.

The Ramones want to know DO YOU REMEMBER ROCK ‘N’ ROLL RADIO? Has it ever gone away?

Collecting objects  that remind us of old times should bring back good memories, but that’s not always the case as Soft Cell tell it in MEMORABILIA. Sarah Vaughan would rather experience something that didn’t work out than never do anything at all in  I’D RATHER HAVE A MEMORY THAN A DREAM. The real classic of this triple play, however, was the Shangri-Las with their ode to a lost love affair: REMEMBER (WALKIN IN THE SAND). Here’s a great clip from the excellent “Songmakers Collection” DVD, with interviews with Mary Weiss and writer producer George ‘Shadow’ Morton about this track and their other hit, LEADER OF THE PACK.

Jurassic 5 dug deep into their memory banks for REMEMBER HIS NAME. As did Fall Out Boy for THNKS FR TH MMRS . The Zutons, REMEMBER ME is about those kind of  friends who seem to forget you once they are entrenched in a romantic relationship. Don’t you just hate that!

THOSE WERE THE DAYS is from Cream’s 1968 album Wheels of Fire. The album cover was designed by Australian artist Martin Sharpe and it won the the New York Art Directors Prize for best album cover in 1969. The sound on the album was characterised by a hybrid of blues, hard rock and psychdelic rock, combined with Eric Clapton’s blues guitar, Ginger Baker’s jazz-influenced drumming and the basslines and voice of Jack Bruce.

One of the most beautiful voices I’ve heard belongs to Sarah McLachlan. And one of my favourite songs of hers is one that I  first heard on the soundtrack to the film The Brothers McMullen. It’s called  I WILL REMEMBER YOU.

Otis Redding’s name is synonymous with the term ‘soul’ and we had to include his classic with I’VE GOT DREAMS TO REMEMBER. Redding died at the very early age of 26 but his memory is kept alive with the Youth Educational Dream Foundation and a very good website. Go to: http://www.otisredding.com/

British group Bloc Party look back regretfully on an opportunity for love that wasn’t realised in I STILL REMEMBER:

The Kinks wonder what ever happened to their childhood friend in  DO YOU REMEMBER WALTER? It’s from their album The Kinks Are the Village Green Preservation Society.

The Supremes reflected on the good and bad memories of a love that used to be in REFLECTIONS while Jimi Hendrix had only good memories of a past love, (he even wants her back!),  in REMEMBER.

Relationships that survive depend partly on shared memories, but those memories need constant topping up.  Indie rockers, Yo La Tengo document this well in OUR WAY TO FALL.

There was a fair bit of nostalgia in this week’s show, (well what did you expect?) and one of my faves was The Platters with REMEMBER WHEN. Also fitting the bill was Elvis Presley who seems somewhat confused in I FORGOT TO REMEMBER TO FORGET.

Memories, daydreams, disconnected thoughts – they fill our minds in a never-ending rush. Our next song, THE WINDMILLS OF YOUR MIND, evoked this beautifully, conveying the incredible weirdness of our thought processes. If you’re after nostalgia then what about Noel Harrison with the original version of the song that served the film The Thomas Crown Affair so well.

Ok back to recent memories. Jack Johnson wonders DO YOU REMEMBER? and P.M. Dawn are SET ADRIFT ON A MEMORY. Thanks to Lynden for suggesting that one and several others on our list today.

One of my favourite films deals with amnesia. Memento, starring Guy Pearce, and directed by Christopher Nolan, is a fascinating story about someone who can’t store new memories. A song about about the subject is I DON’T REMEMBER by Peter Gabriel.

Bob Dylan’s memory song is a love ballad from the Empire Burlesque album: I’LL REMEMBER YOU. And if its nostalgia that you’re after, consider MEMORIES ARE MADE OF THIS from Dean Martin. An oldie but a goodie, as they say.

I’ll never forget Michael Jackson with REMEMBER THE TIME from the Dangerous album. Another sad memory for me is Freddy Mercury singing THOSE WERE THE DAYS OF OUR LIVES which many think was the song he dedicated to his fellow Queen members when he knew that he was dying.

Back to the 70’s and some Aussie based punk rock: remember The Saints and MEMORIES ARE MADE OF THIS?

We closed the show with a cover of a song that I swore I wouldn’t play this week, but this version is so sweet it had to make the cut: The Waifs with a little help from Clare Bowditch. They’re singing Frank Ifields I REMEMBER YOU.

This week’s theme on MEMORY segues nicely into next week’s topic. My computer crashed last week and I had to invest in a drive with a lot more memory to cope with all the songs that I collect for these shows. So next week its MACHINES, ROBOTS AND COMPUTERS. No Television or Radio songs please because you know they are a whole theme to themselves. and no modes of transport, for the same reason.  But any other gadget or gizmo is up for grabs.

Here’s this week’s complete playlist. All songs available on iTunes.

Yesterme Yesteryou Yesterday – Stevie Wonder

Veronica – Elvis Costello

Do You Remember Rock ‘N’ Roll Radio – The Ramones

Memorabilia – Soft Cell

I’d Rather Have a Memory Than a Dream – Sarah Vaughan

Remember (Walkin’ in the Sand) – The Shangri-Las

Remember his name – Jurassic 5

Thnks fr th Mmrs – Fall Out Boy

Remember Me – The Zutons

Those Were The Days – Cream

I Will Remember You – Sarah Mclachlan

I’ve Got Dreams To Remember – Otis Redding

I Still Remember – Bloc Party

Do You Remember Walter – The Kinks

Reflections – Diana Ross & the Supremes

Remember – The Jimi Hendrix Experience

Our Way to Fall – Yo La Tengo

Remember When – The Platters

I Forgot to Remember to Forget – Elvis Presley

Do You Remember – Jack Johnson

The Windmills Of Your Mind – Noel Harrison

Set Adrift On Memory Bliss – P.M. Dawn

I Don’t Remember – Peter Gabriel

I’ll Remember You – Bob Dylan

Memories Are Made Of This – Dean Martin

Remember The Time – Michael Jackson

Memories Are Made of This – The Saints

Those Were The Days Of Our Lives – Queen

Remember You (feat. Clare Bowditch) –  The Waifs

Next week: MACHINES, ROBOTS & COMPUTERS

Listen to Lyn McCarthy at the Theme Park on BayFM, Tuesdays 2-4pm, Sydney time

Also streaming on http://www.bayfm.org

Tragically also on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/maccalyn

HOMEGROWN

Our theme this week was a no brainer as the show aired on Australia Day, or ‘Invasion Day’ as some of us like to call it. It seemed appropriate that our show focus on Australian/homegrown music, so we opened with Gangajang and SOUNDS OF THEN (THIS IS AUSTRALIA). Then it was Icehouse with GREAT SOUTHERN LAND.  Is this song quintessentially Australian, or what?

More classic Australiana followed with Sherbert and HOWZAT, Cold Chisel’s FLAME TREES and, rounding out the triple play, EAGLE ROCK from the ever brilliant Daddy Cool. Ross Wilson, Ross Hannaford et al, at their peak. Here’s the official clip from 1971:

Archie Roach is a singer and songwriter of amazing strength and insight. A story teller in the tradition of his ancestors, Archie conveys intimate real life stories as well as traditional stories of the Dreaming. Having survived a personal history that would have left most artists scarred and defeated, Archie Roach has emerged as an extraordinarily gifted Australian artist with a truly visionary talent. I chose to play TOO MANY BRIDGES, from the 2007 album Journey.

Yilila’s track E DHUMBALA is from their CD Digipack EP, Aeroplane, released in 2006. With their unique brand of Traditional/reggae/rock music, they have to be one of my favourite Indigenous bands. Unfortunately this track wasn’t available as a video clip, but I encourage you to check them out.

I’m also loving the group Tinpan Orange. Emily Lubitz, Jessie Lubitz and Alex Burkoy are all very talented but Emily’s voice is so seductive. Try and get hold of their new album THE BOTTOM OF THE LAKE and take a listen to the track of the same name.

Next up it was Thirsty Merc and SOMEDAY, SOMEDAY. Bit of trivia for you: The band’s name came from a gas guzzling Mercedes Benz belonging to the band members, with the numberplate ‘THRSTY’.

One of my all time favourites, and one the tracks I had to play again from last year’s All Australian show, is the Saints song (I’M) STRANDED. Equally, The Easybeats had to get another run, but this year I thought I’d give FRIDAY ON MY MIND a rest and instead we heard another standard of theirs: WEDDING RING.

Nostalgia was hitting hard when Billy Thorpe and the Aztecs delivered MOST PEOPLE I KNOW THINK THAT I’M CRAZY and Men At Work rounded out the first hour of the show with the iconic Aussie anthem, DOWN UNDER.

The Living End asked  a question that may have been on everyone’s lips: WHAT’S ON YOUR RADIO? Mate! All Australian, homegrown, classics. No less. And we needed some female rock energy to bring some balance into the day’s playlist. Can’t get better that Chrissie Amphlett and The Divinyls with SCIENCE FICTION.

Anyone remember The Beasts of Bourbon?  LET’S GET FUNKY is from their 1990 album ‘Black Milk’. Tex Perkins, you are one radical dude.

Their’s been lots of tripping down memory lane, so I thought I would throw in the occasional contemporary recording, like Empire of the Sun and of their best,  HALF MAST. Of course, with a baby boomer creating the playlist, it wasn’t long before we returned to the oldies, (but goodies!). My favourite Crowded House track is DON’T DREAM THAT IT’S OVER and we followed with Richard Clapton and GIRLS ON THE AVENUE. Here’s a clip of Rick performing live at the 2007 Countdown Spectacular Tour. He has got to be one of Australia’s most talented artists.

There is no way you can create an Australian playlist and leave out Paul Kelly. And we didn’t. I left the overplayed and obvious tracks alone and chose another of his that I really like, YOU’RE LOVIN’ IS ON MY MIND. Leah Flanagan was one of my picks for ‘best of’  the recent Mullumbimby Music Festival. Loving TYPSY TANGO which you can find on her 2008 album LEAH FLANAGAN BAND. Now I know that The Black Seeds are from New Zealand but that doesn’t stop me adopting them for today’s show (isn’t that we do with all talented Kiwis – they become instant honorary Aussies?). Their song COME TO ME is a great example of their funk/afrobeat/soul sound.

Cold Chisel were the only band to get two songs onto the list. And that’s because I couldn’t leave out what some think is THE Aussie rock song: KHE SANH. This clip is worth viewing just for the audience’s reaction. Chisel fans unite!

I missed Rose Tattoo when they performed in Byron Bay recently, but I hear they still know how to rock a room. So, my pick was ROCK N ROLL OUTLAW.

We closed the show with one of the best of the current crop of Australian talent and followed with one of our most enduring rock bands.  Little Birdy is a four piece group from Perth with Katy Steele on vocals. The song I chose was COME ON. Then it was the one and only AC/DC and IT’S A LONG WAY TO THE TOP. I’ve uploaded videos of AccaDacca before, so let’s take a look at Little Birdy:

This week all the kids, and the teachers, are back at school. So next week’s show is dedicated to them with all songs about SCHOOL. Got any suggestions? Drop me a line either on the blog or through the bayfm.org site. Love to hear from you.

Here’s this week’s playlist:

Sounds Of Then (This Is Australia) – Gangajang
Great Southern Land – Icehouse
Howzat – Sherbet
Flame Trees – Cold Chisel
Eagle Rock – Daddy Cool
Too Many Bridges – Archie Roach
E Dhumbala – Yilila
The Bottom Of The Lake – Tinpan Orange
Someday, Someday – Thirsty Merc
(I’m) Stranded – The Saints
Wedding Ring -The Easybeats
Most people I know think that I’m crazy – Billy Thorpe and the Aztecs
Down Under – Men At Work
What’s On Your Radio – The Living End
Science Fiction – The Divinyls
Let’s Get Funky – Beasts Of Bourbon
Don’t Dream Its Over – Crowded House
Girls on the Avenue – Richard Clapton
Half Mast – Empire Of The Sun
Your Lovin’ Is On My Mind – Paul Kelly
Come To Me – The Black Seeds
Typsy Tango – Leah Flanagan
Khe Sanh – Cold Chisel
Rock’n’Roll Outlaw – Rose Tattoo
Come On – Little Birdy
Its A Long Way To The Top – AC/DC
Next week: School

Listen to Lyn McCarthy at the Theme Park on BayFM, Tuesdays 2-4pm, Sydney time.

Also streaming on http://www.bayfm.org

Tragically also on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/maccalyn

Australia

matchboxAustralia, Australia, Australia, we love you yes we do….. so sang The Captain Matchbox Whoopee Band and it opened our show on the day after Australia Day with just the right amount of respectful parody.  The band is based in Melbourne and is centred around singer and multi-instrumentalist Mick Conway (Captain Matchbox) and his brother Jim Conway, who is  widely regarded as one of Australia’s finest exponents of the blues harmonica. Inspired by early jazz and jug band music, their songs stand out for their cheeky sense of humour. A great opener which created the perfect mood for a show which, (like Australians really), doesn’t take itself too seriously.

Yes, I too was over all the nationalistic back-slapping and excuse for a mighty piss-up but, what the hell, I’m ready to jump on the band-wagon if it means I get an excuse to play all my favourite Australian music. The show was a mix of new, old, iconic, one-hit wonders and a tear-jerker thrown in for good measure. And, don’t worry Roy Orbison fans, I even found an Orbison cover to close the show with. The far-sighted Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds delivered a great version of ‘Running Scared’. 

Talking of iconic, I did play some Easybeats and, of course, AC/DC but, as I told my listeners, the first Australian rock’n’roll performer to tour the United States and make the local Top 40 charts was none other than Johhny O’Keefe. He remains Australia’s most successful chart performer, with twenty-nine Top 40 hits to his credit in Australia between 1959 and 1974. His signature tune, ‘Wild One’ was recorded by Iggy Pop as ‘Real Wild Child’ in 1986. It was also used on the soundtrack for the movie ‘Pretty Woman’ and was covered by Jerry Lee Lewis, Everlife, Joan Jett & The Blackhearts, Glamour Camp and many others. My favourite in his line-up is ‘She’s My Baby’. Here’s some very rare television footage of him performing “She’s My Baby” on Bandstand in 1965.

The other groundbreakers in the playlist were The Saints. Formed in Brisbane in 1974, they are considered to be one of the first and most influential punk groups. By 1975, at the same time as the Ramones, they were  employing the fast tempos, raucous vocals and ‘buzzsaw’ guitar that characterised early punk rock. With their single ‘(I’m) Stranded’, in late 1976, they released a record that was way ahead of better-known punk acts like the Sex Pistols and The Clash. Bob Geldof has been quoted as saying, “Rock music in the Seventies was changed by three bands – The Sex Pistols, The Ramones and The Saints.”

Thanks to the lovely Linda Airey, publicist to the stars, who visited the studio while she was on holiday in Byron. She’s worked with some some fantastic talent having worked for Virgin in London and Roadshow in Australia and she now heads up her own publicity outfit out of Sydney. Not enough time to get all the dirt out of her, but she’ll be back, or so she threatens.

The two h0urs went way too quickly as usual. Here’s the playlist for you:

Australia  Captain Matchbox

Funky Tonight  John Butler Trio

Paper Aeroplane  Angus & Julia Stone

Good Things Come To Me Now  Karma County

Thunderbirds Are Coming Out  TISM

The Bold And The Beautiful  The Drugs

You Sound Like Louis Burdett  The Whitlams

I Need You Tonight  INXS

Where The Wild Roses Grow  Nick Cave & Kylie Minogue

Lighthouse  The Waifs

Banjo & Violin  The Audreys

Bad Luck Everywhere You Go  C.W. Stoneking

Treaty, Radio Mix – Yothu Yindi

Put Down That Weapon  Midnight Oil

Down River  Wllcannia Mob

Let Me Be  Xavier Rudd

Black Betty  Spiderbait

Woman  Wolfmother

Save The Day  The Living End

She’s My Baby  Johnny O’Keefe

She’s So Fine  The Easybeats

Thunderstruck  ACDC

Punks Not Dead  Darren Hanlon

(I’m) Stranded  The Saints

Pussy Town  Machine Gun Fellatio

Cocaine – The Cruel Sea

Don’t dream its over  Crowded House

Somewhere Over The Rainbow  Billy Thorpe & The Aztecs

Running Scared  Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds

Next week is the 50th anniversary of Buddy Holly, Richie Valens and the Big Bopper’s death by plane crash, so next week’s theme is ‘They Died in a Plane Crash’. Think of a playlist with the famous three,  as well as Patsy Cline, John Denver, Otis Redding, Stevie Ray Vaughan….. 

Tune in to Lyn McCarthy on BayFM 99.9 Tuesdays 2-4pm Sydney time. Also streaming on http://www.bayfm.org

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