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RESOLUTIONS & FRESH STARTS

Now, you may think I’m a bit behind the eight ball, doing a show on RESOLUTIONS AND FRESH STARTS in mid January, but I have a policy of not even thinking about New Year Resolutions until after my birthday, which is around this time. I’m not prepared to give up my wicked ways until those celebrations are well out of the way. And, to be honest, that could take up to 6 months at least.

So, I’ll allow the playlist to do the job for me. The wonderful Nina Simone set the tone with FEELING GOOD. She’s full of optimism because it’s a new day, a new life and she’s feeling good. I wonder how long that lasted? Because, as we all know, new resolutions and fresh starts are often accompanied by regret and, unfortunately, they almost always carry the potential for failure. But, let’s at least try and maintain some hope.

The Allman Brothers Band have had their ups and downs, so on a song like CHANGE MY WAY OF LIVING they’re sounding mighty ambitious. But hey, let’s give them the benefit of the doubt.

It was great to have Blues/Roots duo The Fridays in the studio for a chat and some live music. They’re from Adelaide and presently in Byron performing and promoting their EP Woh Oh. Kimberly McKenzie and Kelly Breuer’s original material melds rock out riffs with beautiful harmonies. A couple of the songs had me laughing out loud.  As well as playing ROMANCE COMEDY from their EP we were able to have them perform two other numbers live and it was such a pleasure. If you get a chance to catch them perform, anywhere, don’t miss out on supporting some fantastic up and coming Australian talent.

Motown giants The Supremes and The Temptations got together to record a version of Dee Dee Warwick’s I’M GONNA MAKE YOU LOVE ME and it became a huge hit for them in 1969. We followed that with the very appropriate NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTIONS from two more soul greats, Otis Redding and Carla Thomas.

If only Thin Lizzy’s Phil Lynot had followed through on his resolution, he might still be with us. Instead,  I’VE GOT TO GIVE IT UP, is a sad memorial to this amazing talent who died at 36.

Something a little less serious:  Husker Du reckon they’re NEVER TALKING TO YOU AGAIN. Oh come on guys, never say never. Bob Dylan is equally resolute. He swears he’s never going to work on  MAGGIES FARM no more. Fair enough.

The Who are convinced that they WON’T GET FOOLED AGAIN. A good resolution if ever I heard one, but, like a lot of resolutions, not that easy to keep.

Mama Kin is very convincing on her resolution song I’M GONNA DO IT. As is Bobby Bland who says he AIN’T GONNA BE THE FIRST TO CRY.

John Legend gets a little bit of help from Snoop Dogg on I CAN CHANGE. On this video clip he carries the day on his own (and you get the bonus of Spottie as well). Its a live performance in London with a terrific band and back-up.

George Thorogood & The Destroyers contributed one of those songs full of  promises. You know the ones:  men make them in order to win the woman of their dreams. In this case George says I’LL CHANGE MY STYLE.

Bobbie Gentry, who’s obviously met a few ‘Georges’ in her time swears I’LL NEVER FALL IN LOVE AGAIN.

Nick Cave, apparently has all the right intentions, he just has trouble delivering on his resolutions because RIGHT NOW HE’S A ROAMING. Steve Winwood knows that if you’re really serious about wanting a fresh start you have to make it happen WHILE YOU SEE A CHANCE.

Somehow I don’t think Ian Dury and the Blockheads were serious at all when they sang I WANT TO BE STRAIGHT.

Princess Superstar’s QUITTING SMOKING SONG was edited a little, otherwise we wouldn’t have been able to play it on radio, and that would have been a pity, I reckon. Meanwhile, Black Kids are promising I’M NOT GOING TO TEACH YOUR BOYFRIEND HOW TO DANCE WITH YOU. Quite right too.

A fun couple of songs to exit on: Mary Martin and the cast of South Pacific with I’M GONNA WASH THAT MAN RIGHT OUT OF MY HAIR. And one of my favourites, the wonderfully eccentric and optimistic Jonathan Richman, who knows all about fresh starts on I’M JUST BEGINNING TO LIVE.

Thanks to The Fridays for coming in and entertaining us in the first hour of the program. Don’t forget they’re performing at the Rails Hotel in Byron Bay on Thursday January 20th so get along and support them.

Thanks also to Lina, Chilla, Shel, Allan, Andy and Victoria for letting us know what their New Year Resolutions were for this year.

Next week’s show will be ALL AUSTRALIAN. Lots of nostalgia and some new stuff as well.

Until then, here’s this week’s playlist:

Feeling Good / Nina Simone

Change My Way Of Living / The Allman Brothers Band

Romance Comedy / The Fridays

I’m Gonna Make You Love Me / The Supremes

New Year’s Resolution / Otis Redding and Carla Thomas

Got To Give It Up / Thin Lizzy

Never Talking To You Again / Hüsker Dü

Maggie’s Farm / Bob Dylan

Won’t Get Fooled Again / The Who

I’m Gonna Do It / Mama Kin

I Ain’t Gonna Be The First To Cry / Bobby “Blue” Bland

I Can Change ft. Snoop Dogg / John Legend

I’ll Never Fall In Love Again / Bobbie Gentry

I’ll Change My Style / George Thorogood and The Destroyers

Right Now I’m A-Roaming / Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds

I Want To Be Straight / Ian Dury and The Blockheads

While You See A Chance / Steve Winwood

One Way Or Another / Blondie

Quitting Smoking Song / Princess Superstar

I’m Not Gonna Teach Your Boyfriend How To Dance With You / Black Kids

I’m Gonna Wash That Man Right Out of My Hair / Mary Martin and The Girl’s Chorus of South Pacific

I’m Just Beginning To Live /Jonathan Richman and The Modern Lovers

Next week:  40 YEARS OF CLASSIC AUSTRALIAN ROCK

Listen to Lyn McCarthy at the Theme Park on BayFM, Tuesdays 4-6pm, Sydney time
Also streaming via BayFM
Tragically also on Facebook and Twitter
Email me at: lyn.themeparkradio@gmail.com


TRUTH & LIES

We call them fibs, falsehoods, fish stories, tall tales, whoppers but what’s really true is that lies have become almost commonplace, and unfortunately we’ve come to expect them from our electioneering hopefuls. But I won’t lie to you: This week’s show was full of great music, all of it on the subject of Truth & Lies. And its a perfect topic for the lead up to our federal election here in Australia.

So, could I have chosen a better opening song than WOULD I LIE TO YOU from the Eurythmics?

The great Freddy Mercury kept the ball rolling with another song suitable for the upcoming election: THE GREAT PRETENDER:

Clarence Carter delivered a song about people who tell lies behind your back. The song’s called THE BACKSTABBERS. Another kind of liar that we seem to condone is THE CARD CHEAT. The Clash turn the concept of the poker face into a pretty good song.

Aretha Franklin begged us – DON’T PLAY THAT SONG, but we had to anyway. And Little Richard sang his 1967 hit DON’T DECEIVE ME.

Jack Johnson isn’t sure he has the answers or that he wants to know the reason we’re all here on ANYTHING BUT THE TRUTH. And from that we had nowhere else to go than some pure pop with The Go-Gos and their 1981 pop hit, OUR LIPS ARE SEALED.

Eric Clapton, who knows just a little bit about an addict’s self-denial, gave us COCAINE. And we followed with another piece of self-delusion: Mary Gauthier’s I DRINK.

Okkervil River’s POP LIE was followed by a song that spoke to many during the Vietnam War. AMERICAN RUSE was recorded by MC5 in 1969 and it points out the American government’s grand deception during this time. Check out these early punk rockers. Excellent.

Lots of requests for Leonard Cohen this week. So IN MY SECRET LIFE made the list, especially for Robyn, Des, Julie & Waldo. I know its heresy to all you Cohen fans, but I haven’t been one of them. If any of his songs could convert me, however, it would be this one. And I’m a sucker for a quirky video clip:

The song LOLA is about someone who misrepresents their gender and gets the Kinks all in a lather. Better to do what Eric Clapton and Steve Winwood suggest and TELL THE TRUTH, I think.

Feist’s I FEEL IT ALL is the third single from her critically acclaimed 2007 album The Reminder.  It’s basically a love song about how lies can divide. Matchbox 20’s song BED OF LIES can be interpreted as not being who you really are within a relationship, or, just leading a life that’s not true to who you really are.

Regular contributor Robyn suggested a few songs this week but one that I had forgotten and had to include was The Thompson Twins with LIES. Couldn’t help myself and had to follow with The Monkees and I’M A BELIEVER. Take me back to 1966!

John Lennon, and I, have a message for all you politicians: (Just) GIMME SOME TRUTH. Fleetwood Mac, on the other hand,  only have love on their minds and they’d prefer that you TELL ME LIES. Depeche Mode have a similar opinion. They’re convinced that honesty’s not always the best policy on POLICY OF TRUTH. Released in 1990, its from their Violator album.

It was a toss up between The Who’s LA LA LIES and  IT’S NOT TRUE for inclusion this week, but went with the latter. Both songs highly underrated I think.

Love the high-octante performance here from Blondie with LITTLE GIRL LIES. Watch for when Debbie shouts: “Hey I want some back up!” Check out this live performance:

Aussie reggae band Blue King Brown aren’t going to take it no more. At least that’s what they’re saying on the brilliant MOMENT OF TRUTH.

We closed the show with the beautiful voice of up and coming musical star Megan Washington. The song I BELIEVE YOU LIAR is from the recently released album of the same name. Someone to watch for sure.

I’d love to have your suggestions for next week’s show, which will be on LIFE’S LESSONS. Songs that express what life is all about. They will have an element of advice about them, like “You Can’t Always Get What You Want” . Come on, you know you like a challenge.

Here’s this week’s complete playlist:

Would I Lie To You – Be Yourself Tonight, Eurythmics

The Great Pretender – The Very Best of Freddie Mercury Solo, Freddie Mercury

Backstabbers – Tarantino Experience II, Clarence Carter

The Card Cheat – London Calling, The Clash

Don’t Play That Song – Aretha Franklin

Don’t Deceive Me – The Explosive Little Richard, Little Richard

Anything But The Truth – To The Sea,  Jack Johnson

Our Lips Are Sealed – Beauty and the Beat, The Go-Go’s

Cocaine – Eric Clapton

I Drink – Theme Time Radio Hour with Your Host Bob Dylan, Mary Gauthier

Pop Lie -The Stand Ins, Okkervil River

The American Ruse – Back In The USA, MC5

In My Secret Life – Ten New Songs, Leonard Cohen

Lola – Lola vs Powerman, The Kinks

Tell the Truth – Live from Madison Square Garden, Eric Clapton and Steve Winwood

I Feel It All – The Reminder, Feist

Bed of Lies – Mad Season, Matchbox 20

Lies – Classic MTV: Class of 1983, Thompson Twins

I’m A Believer – The Monkeys

Gimme Some Truth – Lennon Disc 2 John Lennon

Tell Me Lies – Fleetwood Mac

Policy of Truth – Depeche Mode

It’s Not True – My Generation Deluxe Edition (Extended Version), The Who

Little Girl Lies – Blondie, Blondie

Moment of Truth – Moment of Truth, Single, Blue King Brown

I Believe You Liar – I Believe You Liar, Washington

Next week: LIFE’S LESSONS

Listen to Lyn McCarthy at the Theme Park on BayFM, Tuesdays 4-6pm, Sydney time

Also streaming on http://www.bayfm.org

Tragically also on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/maccalyn

Email me at: lyn.themeparkradio@gmail.com

CHANGE

Theme Park is now in Drive Time! I’m very excited, (explanation points aside, can you tell?). To celebrate, the topic this week was CHANGE. There were songs about every possible variety of change: political, social, cultural, emotional, physical, even the kind you find at the bottom of your handbag when you most need it.

BayFM is now in its Winter season and with Theme Park’s new time of Tuesdays 4-6pm, you may have only just discovered us. So, if this is your first visit, the idea is not to find a list of the “best” songs on a subject, because “best” is boring and more or less just involves me reaffirming how great the Beatles, Radiohead and Roy Orbison are.  No, what we’re trying to create is a thematically coherent playlist with a mix of genres, eras and moods. Some songs you’ll already know; some, maybe, you won’t, and hopefully each week we’ll rediscover the classics, and discover new music, together.

We opened the show with Michael Jackson’s MAN IN THE MIRROR. And what a great message it is: if you want to change the world then start with yourself and your attitude to those less fortunate than yourself. We followed with something a little less serious: the great Ella Fitzgerald with ANYTHING GOES from her album ‘The Cole Porter Songbook’. It was the first album she recorded for the Verve album in 1956.

John Mayer is in Australia at the moment and I’ll forgive his indiscretions in recent interviews because WAITIN’ ON THE WORLD TO CHANGE is such a great track. Here he is with an acoustic version of the song. Very nice.

We followed with the  definitive cover of Bob Dylan’s ALL ALONG THE WATCHTOWER by Jimi Hendrix. Dylan wrote this song at a time that he was experiencing a complete life change, with two young children and a growing interest in the Bible. Hendrix’s version is so highly regarded that Dylan has been quoted as saying: “I liked Jimi Hendrix’s record of this and ever since he died I’ve been doing it that way… Strange how when I sing it, I always feel it’s a tribute to him in some kind of way.”

Everyone’s allowed to change their mind now and again. A couple of terrific songs about the subject are the Cardigans’ ERASE/REWIND and soul singer Tyrone Davis’ CAN I CHANGE MY MIND?

A completely different perspective on change came from the band Blind Melon. The track CHANGE is from their 1992 self-titled debut album and was the first written by lead singer Shannon Hoon, who struggled with a drug dependancy. The song encourages you to change your life when it gets too hard. Unfortunately Hoon found it difficult to take his own advice and he died in 1995, at 28, from an overdose. His grave is inscribed with words from the song.

Do you think money changes you? According to Cyndi Lauper MONEY CHANGES EVERYTHING. Aretha Franklin, on the other hand, reckons MONEY WON’T CHANGE YOU. I think Aretha may have won that round.

Daniel Merriwether received a little bit of help from, rapper, Wale in the song CHANGE. The song and, in fact, the whole album was produced by wunderkid Mark Ronson. Rather than just play the official video clip, here’s a ‘making of’ that you might find interesting.

Country rockers, The Allman Brothers Band, sound as if they have hit rock bottom and are ready to do something about it in the very bluesy CHANGE MY WAY OF LIVING.

Another great rock group is Muse. The song FEELING GOOD is probably best known for Nina Simone’s outstanding recording.  Here, Muse take the optimism of Simon’s standard to a whole other place.

We rounded out the hour with THE REVOLUTION WILL NOT BE TELEVISED. Recorded in 1971, it’s a poem and a song by Gil Scott-Heron, generally considered to be the father of hip-hop and neo soul.

I’M COMING OUT is a joyous disco number from Diana Ross. Nile Rodgers and Bernard Edwards, of the 70’s Disco band ‘Chic’, wrote and produced the track. Rodgers got the idea for the song when he went to a transvestite club in New York City. He went to the bathroom, and while he was standing at the urinal, he saw three men who were all dressed as Diana Ross.

I love my R&B. Anyone who saw Sharon Jones and the Dap Kings at the Blues Fest a few years ago know what a dynamic group they are. A great song from them is SOMETHING’S CHANGED. We followed with A CHANGE IS GONNA COME. Sam Cooke’s Dylan-inspired, lump-in-the-throat protest song mourns both racial intolerance and his infant son’s fatal drowning. And it’s the most requested song in our list today.

Joni Mitchell’s song BIG YELLOW TAXI is about changes brought about by so-called ‘progress’; “they paved paradise and put up a parking lot.” Sound familiar? And a big shout out to everyone in Mullumbimby, while we’re on the subject of unnecessary change.

David Bowie’s song CHANGES is one you must have predicted. And I’m nothing, if not predictable. We followed with another very predictable track: THE TIMES THEY ARE A CHANGIN’,  although it’s not Bob Dylan but a wonderful version by Nina Simone.

Let’s talk physical change. Can you get any better than Lou Reed’s TAKE A WALK ON THE WILD SIDE? It’s from the Transformer album, recorded in 1972 and produced by David Bowie. “Plucked her eyebrows on the way, shaved her legs and then he was a she.” Yep, that’s what I call change.

Talking of changing teams, Eric Clapton and Steve Winwood contributed a track from their Live From Madison Square Garden album, called, appropriately, TEAM CHANGES. And then it was time to head back to a song about political change: Tracey Chapman with TALKIN’ BOUT A REVOLUTION.

John Legend got some help from Snoop Dogg on I CAN CHANGE. That’s for the right girl,  he asserts. Yeah yeah, heard it all before Johnny.

The Audreys do a gorgeous cover of the INXS song DON’T CHANGE. It challenges you not to change. Because you’re perfectly OK as you are, you know. The song is from the album, Between Last Night and Us. Here they are performing at Woodford Folk Festival, 2009:

We closed the show with a beauty: the Beatles and ACROSS THE UNIVERSE. “Nothings going to change my world.” Well, maybe, but one thing I do know is that change is inevitable and while we might not appreciate it at the time, its all good.

Next week’s theme will be MORE CRED WHEN DEAD. Yes, every track will be from an artist who has passed on to that big disco in the sky and more than likely became more successful after they were gone. Big list to choose from, so inevitably there will be some omissions. But let me know your requests anyway. Love to hear from you.

Here’s this week’s playlist. From this week, I’ll include the album names as well. You can find all songs on iTunes.

Man in the Mirror – Bad, Michael Jackson

Anything Goes – The Cole Porter Songbook (CD1), Ella Fitzgerald

Waiting on the World to Change – Continuum, John Mayer

All Along The Watchtower – The Ultimate Experience, Jimi Hendrix

Erase/Rewind – Gran Turismo, The Cardigans

Can I Change My Mind – Billboard Top 100 Of 1969, Tyrone Davis

Change – Blind Melon, Blind Melon

Money Changes Everything – Twelve Deadly Cyns, Cyndi Lauper

Money Won’t Change You – Lady Soul,  Aretha Frankin

Change – Love & War, Daniel Merriweather (and Wale)

Change My Way of Living – Where It All Begins, The Allman Brothers Band

Feeling Good – The Best of Muse CD2, Muse

The Revolution Will Not Be Televised – The Breaks II, Gil Scott-Heron

I’m Coming Out – Floorfillers 80s Club Classics CD3 – Diana Ross

Something’s Changed – 100 Days, 100 Nights,  Sharon Jones and the Dap-Kings

A Change Is Gonna Come – The Man & His Music, Sam Cooke

Big Yellow Taxi – Ladies of the Canyon, Joni Mitchell

Changes – Hunky Dory, David Bowie

The Times They Are a Changin’ – Forever Young, Gifted & Black, Nina Simone

Take a Walk on the Wild Side – Transformer Lou Reed

Team Changes – Live From Madison Square Garden Cd1, Eric Clapton, Steve Winwood

Talkin’ Bout a Revolution – Tracy Chapman, Tracy Chapman

I Can Change feat. Snoop Dogg – Get Lifted, John Legend

Don’t Change – Between Last Night and Us, The Audreys

Across The Universe – Let It Be, The Beatles

Next week: MORE CRED WHEN DEAD

Listen to Lyn McCarthy at the Theme Park on BayFM, Tuesdays 4-6pm, Sydney time

Also streaming on http://www.bayfm.org

Tragically also on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/maccalyn


WALKING & RUNNING

As a penance for my birthday indulgence last week, our theme this time was WALKING & RUNNING. ‘Cause a little bit of exercise never hurt anyone, now did it? Still, I think painting the town red must have still been on my mind as we opened the program with Lou Reed’s WALK ON THE WILD SIDE, from the 1972 album Transformer. It was produced by David Bowie who also sang backing vocals.

Here in Byron Bay, ‘doing the lighthouse walk’ is a daily excursion for some people. So, Kate Bush’s RUNNING UP THAT HILL was dedicated to them. It’s a great one to put on your iPod if you’re one of those mad people who walk or run as your preferred form of exercise.

Now you all know I love my Motown. So, WALK AWAY RENEE, released in 1968 by the Four Tops, was a given.  As was NOWHERE TO RUN, a signature tune for Martha Reeves & The Vandellas, that was released way back in 1965. Check out this video clip from the same year. What to say about the back up dancers? OMG, the outfits, the dance moves!!!

Annie Lennox contributed WALKING ON BROKEN GLASS (ouch!) and then it was another true classic: Johnny Cash singing I WALK THE LINE and to round out the triple play beautifully, it was Fats Domino with I’M WALKING. Although it’s not the version we played on the show, take a look at this great clip of Fats Domino performing the song with Ricky Nelson. A great combination. And who is that saxophone player? Brilliant.

A little bit of UB40 followed with DON’T WALK ON THE GRASS and then it was Rufus Thomas with one of his biggest hits, WALKING THE DOG.

Empire of the Sun walked away with lots of awards for their debut album, WALKING ON A DREAM and the song of the same name was perfect for our show this week. As was Raphael Saadiq’s very suggestive, LET’S TAKE A WALK. Believe it or not this video, (like the song) was created in 2008. I’m loving the retro feel.

One for all the sleepwalkers – the brilliant R&B  voice of Berna Dean singing I WALK IN MY SLEEP. Then it was Jimmy Rogers with WALKING BY MYSELF and a request from Judi, listening in Cairns: Patsy Cline’s I GO WALKING AFTER MIDNIGHT.

Did you know that John Lennon disowned the song RUN FOR YOUR LIFE from the Rubber Soul album? He eventually wrote a much more politically correct tune called JEALOUS GUY. But hey, we live dangerously at the Theme Park, so RUN FOR YOUR LIFE it was.   We  followed with Steve Winwood and the Spencer Davis Group’s very appropriate, (if you were one of the Beatles’ girlfriends anyway), KEEP ON RUNNING. Check out the very young Steve Winwood in this clip. So cute.

It’s impossible NOT to sing along to WALKING ON SUNSHINE by Katrina and the Waves. It’s such an optimistic, sunny song that suits the fabulous Summer weather we are having here in beautiful Byron Bay.

WALK A MILE IN MY SHOES by  Joe South and The Believers is a great song as is WALK ON from, none other than, Mr Roy Orbison.  Then it was the incorrigible Tom Waits with WALKING SPANISH from my favourite album of his, Rain Dogs.

More R&B was on the agenda with the great Sam Cooke and I’LL COME RUNNING BACK TO YOU. He would have been 79  this week (January 22). Sadly he died at 33 years of age, in a shooting incident. He is quite rightly considered one of the pioneers and founders of soul music.

A couple of ballads that couldn’t be omitted from our show on WALKING & RUNNING are YOU’LL NEVER WALK ALONE by Gerry & The Pacemakers, (remember them?) and Dionne Warwick’s WALK ON BY.

Jack, in Sydney, requested WALK THIS WAY, from Run DMC and Aerosmith. Excellent choice. Love the combination of hard rock and hip-hop. There should be more of it, I say.

Then it was time for some Blues:  One of my favourites from last year’s Byron Bay Blues Festival was Seasick Steve, so I was happy to play WALKING MAN from his album, I Started Out With Nothin’ And I Still Got Most Of It Left. Then it was  John Lee Hooker with RUN ON and James Taylor covering Jnr Walker and the Allstars’ I’M A ROAD RUNNER.

Grace Jones is unique. She does an amazing version of WALKING IN THE RAIN, originally recorded by Australian band Flash and the Pan. You’ll find it on her  Nightclubbing album, released in 1981.

A show on WALKING & RUNNING wouldn’t be the same without Creedence Clearwater Revival’s hit, RUN THROUGH THE JUNGLE. Or The Modern Lovers’ ROADRUNNER. Or The Bangles’ WALK LIKE AN EGYPTIAN. But my favourite from this week’s show has to be an oldie but a goodie, Helen Shapiro’s WALKING BACK TO HAPPINESS. Can you believe that she was only 14 when she recorded this in 1961? Wow.

Next week, the show falls on Australia Day so I have no choice but to play some of my favourite Australian tracks. Tune in then if you like your music homegrown or are hoping for some appropriate tunes to compliment your Australia Day party.

And in signing off, I offer you this wonderful piece of graffiti that came to my attention this week: “Be happy today. Why wait?”

Here’s this week’s playlist:

Walk on the Wild Side – Lou Reed
Running Up That Hill – Kate Bush
Nowhere To Run – Martha Reeves & The Vandellas
Just Walk Away Renee – The Four Tops
Walking On Broken Glass – Annie Lennox
I Walk the Line – Johnny Cash
I’m Walking – Fats Domino
Don’t Walk On the Grass – UB40
Walking The Dog – Rufus Thomas
Walking On A Dream – Empire Of The Sun
Let’s Take A Walk – Raphael Saadiq
I Walk In My Sleep – Berna Dean
Walking by Myself – Jimmy Rogers
I Go Walking After Midnight – Patsy Cline
Run For Your Life – The Beatles
Keep On Running – Steve Winwood/Spencer Davis Group
Let’s Take An Old Fashoned Walk – Frank Sinatra & Doris Day
Walking on Sunshine – Katrina and the Waves
Walk A Mile In My Shoes – Joe South & The Believers
Walk On – Roy Orbison
Walking Spanish – Tom Waits
I’ll Come Running Back To You – Sam Cooke
You Keep Runnin´Away – The Four Tops
You’ll Never Walk Alone -Gerry & The Pacemakers
Walk On By – Dionne Warwick
Walk This Way – Run DMC & Aerosmith
Walking Man – Seasick Steve
Run On – John Lee Hooker
(I’m A) Road Runner – James Taylor (Jnr Walker & Allstars cover)
Walking In The Rain – Grace Jones
Run Through The Jungle – Creedence Clearwater Revival
Roadrunner – The Modern Lovers
Walk Like an Egyptian – The Bangles
Walking Back to Happiness – Helen Shapiro
Next week: Homegrown

Listen to Lyn McCarthy at the Theme Park on BayFM, Tuesdays 2-4pm, Sydney time.

Also streaming on http://www.bayfm.org

Tragically also on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/maccalyn


THE SUMMER OF LOVE

Slip on your kaftans and tie-dye t-shirts. Adorn yourself with flowers and beads. We’re going to light-up some joss-sticks, “ban the bomb” and “make love not war!” This week’s theme is dedicated to that period in 1967 that saw as many as 100,000 people converge on the Haight-Ashbury neighbourhood of San Francisco,  creating what was to become known as the counterculture movement.  The melting pot of music, psychedelic drugs, sexual freedom, creative expression and politics became a defining moment of the 60’s and forever more will be known as THE SUMMER OF LOVE.

It’s easy to reject songs that seem to have been around forever, but consider the context of these songs’ origins and you’ll realize that what many of these musicians were doing hadn’t been done before and, in many cases, would never be done again. So respect to the hippies and the funk soul sisters & brothers and the year 1967 – a time of exploration and finding new ways of expression.

We opened the show with the THE ACID COMMERCIAL from Country Joe & The Fish and then it was the Beatles with ALL YOU NEED IS LOVE. Arguably the greatest band in the world at the top of their powers, Lennon’s anthem to love may not be his strongest but it’s definitely his catchiest. The Beatles made a worldwide television broadcast of the song, in between sessions of transcendental meditation, and it became a #1 hit in both the US & UK. Check out the clip from this transmission and see if you can see Mick Jagger in the audience.

A song that summed up the mood of those flocking to Haight-Ashbury in that Summer of 67 is, of course, Scott McKenzie’s IF YOU’RE GOING TO SAN FRANCISCO, (be sure to wear flowers in your hair). Written by John Phillips of the Mamas & The Papas, it was originally created to promote the 1967 Monterey Pop Festival, which is regarded as being the beginning of the Summer of Love.

FOR WHAT ITS WORTH, by Buffalo Springfield,  is about the closing of the Pandora’s Box Club on the Sunset Strip in Los Angeles and the clash that followed between the police and kids. But the song quickly took on a larger meaning, symbolizing the generational friction happening all across the country as the hippies and flower children freaked out the authorities from coast to coast. Here’s a great clip from the Monterey Festival:

When you listen to PURPLE HAZE, from Jimi Hendrix’s  ‘Are You Experienced?’ album, you can’t help but imagine the rush of a million wanna-be guitarists running into music stores hoping to be just like Jimi.  Check out this video from 1967 with Jimi Hendrix on Guitar, Noel Redding on Bass and Mitch Mitchell on Drums:

In the early sixties The Beach Boys were synonymous with surfing and Californian youth culture. By the mid-sixties, however, their musical style had become a little more complex. A 1967 example of this new sophisticated sound was HEROES AND VILLAINS. We followed  with a song that had the distinction of being the first track to be played on BBC Radio One when it launched in 1967, FLOWERS IN THE RAIN by The Move.  And, to round out the triple play, The Turtles with HAPPY TOGETHER. This track can lift anyone’s mood. While their vocal harmonies verged on sugar-sweet, I don’t know anyone that doesn’t like this song.

I’M A BELIEVER, the Monkees’ hit, was written by none other than Neil Diamond. The song stayed at the top of the charts for six weeks and was the biggest selling single of 1967. That’s right, they even outsold the Beatles and the Stones, and while Neil Diamond, continued to write and perform, he never really needed to work another day in his life after this song took off.  The Mamas & Papas hit, DEDICATED TO THE ONE I LOVE, was originally a hit for the Shirelles in 1961. Here are the Mamas & The Papas with their ’67 version:

Three more classics of the period: Cream’s I FEEL FREE, the Byrds’  SO YOU WANT TO BE A ROCK N ROLL STAR and  Jefferson Airplane’s  SOMEBODY TO LOVE. And then it was Procol Harum with WHITER SHADE OF PALE. This track contains perhaps the most recognizable Hammond B-3 organ rock line ever, snatched from Bach and perhaps a soul player or two. The vague lyrics, however, aren’t very memorable, making the organ bit seem even more imposing and significant than it probably deserves. But hey, what do I know? Here they are on Top of the Pops 1967. Make up your own mind.

Three more songs from that magical time in 1967 referred to as THE SUMMER OF LOVE include I’M A MAN from The Spencer Davis Group, written by Steve Winwood, SAN FRANCISCO NIGHTS from Eric Burdon & the Animals and GET TOGETHER from the Youngbloods.

But the band that epitomised the musical creativity of the sixties is The Beatles. A DAY IN THE LIFE, from their Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band album, utilised a 40 piece orchestra taking 24 bars to go from the lowest note on their instruments to the highest and six people banging on three pianos at the same time in order to produce one huge power chord. The song obliterated every rule that ever existed for what a pop song should sound like and how it should be made, simple as that. Check it out:

One of the most instantly recognizable riffs in rock history is SUNSHINE OF YOUR LOVE, from Cream. And one of the most representative of the period is the Small Faces tune ITCHYCOO PARK. For me, though, when it comes to this period, I can’t overlook Janis Joplin. So an essential track from 1967 has to be Big Brother and the Holding Company with Janis Joplin singing DOWN ON ME.

Jimi Hendrix also deserved another play and this time it was FOXEY LADY. It’s probably worth mentioning here that up until this point Blues guitarists would never have done what Hendrix does on this track. The rule was that the guitar sound should be clean and pure. Jimi however, never got that memo and thank goodness for that.

As well as a time that was marked by anti-Vietnam demonstartions, 1967, unfortunately,  was also a time of race riots, which also fed into the peace movement and hippie revolution with its ideals of compassion, awareness and love. So, in deference to our soul brothers and sisters, it was time for some R&B with I HEARD IT THROUGH THE GRAPEVINE by Gladys Knight and the Pips. This song became a #2 hit in 1967 and Marvin Gay’s renditon hit #1 the following year.  But sticking to the plan, we listened to The Pips version and followed with the one and only Jackie Wilson with his landmark single, HIGHER AND HIGHER.

Although they were a white band, the  Young Rascals GROOVIN’ was pure soul  with its memorable Afro-Cuban mood and mid-tempo groove. Timeless song. Check out the clip of them performing live.

The next track was a bit of a cheat, since it wasn’t released until 1969, after the band had broken up. But TIME OF THE SEASON by The Zombies was written and recorded in August 1967 and the vibe is pure SUMMER OF LOVE, baby.  And then it was the Who with I CAN SEE FOR MILES, the only real hit from their crazy concept album The Who Sell Out and SHE’S A RAINBOW from the Rolling Stones. We’ll overlook the Stones vain attempt of trying to one-up the Beatles and just concentrate on those first seven piano notes, which have been likened to the musical equivalent of heroin.

We closed the show with STRAWBERRY FIELDS FOREVER from the Beatles. The band recorded a version by themselves in one key and then they did a version with an orchestra in a different key. The version you know and love is BOTH versions mixed together, speeding the band version up and the orchestral version down. Magic. This promotional video was filmed in January 1967 and was directed by Peter Goldmann, at the time a Swedish TV director.

Now next week’s show is going to be hotter than hot. As a tribute to the upcoming Summer holiday season the theme will be HEAT. Put your thinking caps on and get in touch!

Here’s this week’s complete playlist:

The Acid Commercial – Country Joe & The Fish
All You Need Is Love – The Beatles
If You’re Going To San Francisco (Be Sure To Wear Some Flowers In Your Hair) – Scott McKenzie
For What It’s Worth – Buffalo Springfield
Purple Haze – Jimi Hendrix
Heroes &  Villains – The Beach Boys
Flowers In The Rain – The Move
Happy Together – The Turtles
I’m a Believer – The Monkees
Dedicated To The One I Love – Mamas & the Papas
I Feel Free – Cream
So You Want To Be A Rock ‘n’ Roll Star – The Byrds
Somebody to Love – Jefferson Airplane
A Whiter Shade Of Pale – Procol Harum
I’m a Man – Spencer Davis Group
San Franciscan Nights – Eric Burdon & The Animals
Get Together – The Youngbloods
A Day In The Life – The Beatles
Sunshine Of Your Love  – Cream
Itchycoo Park – Small Faces
Down On Me – Janis Joplin/Big Brother & The Holding Company
Foxey Lady – Jimi Hendrix
I Heard It Through The Grapevine – Gladys Knight & The Pips
(Your Love Keeps Liftin’ Me) Higher and Higher – Jackie Wilson
Groovin’ – The Young Rascals
Time Of The Season – The Zombies
I Can See for Miles – The Who
She’s a Rainbow – Rolling Stones
Strawberry Fields Forever – The Beatles

Next week: HEAT

Listen to Lyn McCarthy at the Theme Park on BayFM, Tuesdays 2-4pm, Sydney time.

Also streaming on http://www.bayfm.org

Tragically also on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/maccalyn
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