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STREETS & ROADS

I’m baaaack! And this week’s  theme was influenced by my recent road trip down the coast: STREETS AND ROADS. Street songs also include their close relations avenues, lanes and boulevards. They all tend to be about a particular destination.  Songs about roads and highways, on the other hand, are inclined to reflect on a journey of some kind, metaphorical or not. Some of these songs immortalise where they came from, others where they’re going, but all seem to have something significant to say.

We opened the show with the Drifters’ ON BROADWAY – a road that reflects the best and worst of New York. The famous entertainment strip is the epitome of success for some but it’s also a desperate place to be if you are one of the less fortunate. Check out the Drifters doing a great job, but what’s with the outfits? Pyjamas with fringing. What the??????

TOBACCO ROAD was written by country singer John D. Loudermilk and inspired by Erskine Caldwell’s Depression-era novel of the same name. The song reeks of the American south. A group calling themselves the Nashville Teens recorded the original version, although they actually hailed from England. And I don’t think it was even Southern England, cheeky sods!

There are so many versions of the that definitive road song, ROUTE 66, but I rather like the Nat King cole rendition. Eddy Grant took us back  to the 80’s with ELECTRIC AVENUE about a market street in Brixton, London. You may remember a cover version by Aussie band Men at Work, but there’s nothing like the original. Check it out:

The wonderful Emmylou Harris dueted with Dave Matthews on GULF COAST HIGHWAY. Now I don’t believe that there is an actual Gulf Coast Highway, but who cares when the song is so beautiful?

It was a toss up when it came to Bruce Springsteen’s contribution to the show – Both Thunder Road and Racing the Streets were worthy contenders but I had to give it to the Oscar winning anthem, STREETS OF PHILADELPHIA.

Louis Armstrong paid homage to his favourite street in New Orleans in BASIN STREET BLUES and although I gave it a spin on the AUTOMOBILE show,  Grace Jones deserved another outing with PULL UP TO THE BUMPER,  from her critically acclaimed album NIGHTCLUBBING.

Bobby ‘Blue’ Bland was going FARTHER UP THE ROAD while Bob Dylan delivered the classic HIGHWAY 61 REVISITED. And here’s some trivia about that particular highway, which travels from New Orleans through to the Canadian border. Bessie Smith met her death in an automobile accident on that road, Robert Johnson was said to have lost his soul to the devil at the crossroads of Highway 61 and Highway 49, Elvis Presley grew up in the housing projects built along it and Martin Luther King Jnr would later be murdered in a motel just off Highway 61.

The Beatles sang about PENNY LANE while David Byrne and the Talking Heads took the ROAD TO NOWHERE:

A show about roads needed a bit of hard rock and the obvious, of course, is Acca Dacca and HIGHWAY TO HELL. But I thought I’d give them a rest this week and instead, in celebration of the Deep Purple tour reaching Brisbane next month (yay!) it was HIGHWAY STAR instead. Once listed in the Guiness Book of Records as the Word’s loudest rock band, here they are performing live in 1972. Ian Gillian, you are hot! Can’t wait for them to reach Bris-vegas.

Kirsty MacColl calmed things down just a little with WALKING DOWN MADISON, a song that deals with the disparity between rich and poor on the most expensive street in New York, Madison Avenue. As the song goes: “From the sharks in the penthouse to the rats in the basement, it’s not that far”. Gerry Rafferty sang all about London’s BAKER STREET, probably most famous for the literary address of Sherlock Holmes’ residence.

Lots of our songs this week dealt with being down and out, so it was great to include a number by the wonderful Dinah Washington. She’s definitely got the right attitude as she goes walking ON THE SUNNY SIDE OF THE STREET. Recorded in 1956 with orchestra under the direction of Hal Mooney, the song was originally composed in 1930 by Jimmy McHugh and Dorothy Fields  for the Broadway musical “International Revue” starring Gertrude Lawrence. The song has since become a jazz standard recorded by many.

In complete and utter contrast came the Australian Aria award winning hip-hop group, The Hilltop Hoods, with a song about life’s choices: THE HARD ROAD.

Chris Rea’s song, ROAD TO HELL, was apparently inspired by rush hour on a motorway.  After being in Sydney I know how he feels! It’s been way too long since I played some Roy Orbison, so I DROVE ALL NIGHT was in, as it fitted so perfectly.

Green Day’s BOULEVARD OF BROKEN DREAMS is, I assume, about Sunset Boulevard in Los Angeles. Similar to New York’s BROADWAY, Sunset Boulevard is the primary location for live entertainment, as well as being the red-light district and a hang for the homeless.

A fitting follow-up was Ray Charles with LONELY AVENUE and it was up to  Junior Walker and the Allstars to brighten the mood somewhat with ROAD RUNNER.

Another fantastic and, I think, optimistic song about leaving home and heading off for freedom, is VENTURA HIGHWAY, a 1972 hit for America.

The Mamas and Papas sang a song reportedly about the place where they all met, a bar in CREEQUE ALLEY while Ray Charles and the Stray Cats combined on a great version of HIT THE ROAD, JACK.

For anyone living on a rural property, like I do, Lucinda Williams’ CAR WHEELS ON A GRAVEL ROAD will resonate, for sure.

I returned from my trip to Sydney to hear the very sad news that our friend Susie McNair had passed away quietly on Tuesday March 16th. The final song of the program was dedicated to her memory. The Beatles, THE LONG AND WINDING ROAD, was the final single that they recorded as a group. R.I.P. Susie.

Thanks to the following listeners for contributing to this week’s list: Judi, Rebecca and Katie. Next week’s theme is HAIR, so get your thinking caps on!

Meanwhile, here’s this week’s complete playlist:

On Broadway – The Drifters
Tobacco Road – The Nashville Teens
Route 66 – Nat King Cole
Electric Avenue – Eddy Grant
Gulf Coast Highway – Emmylou Harris/Dave Matthews
Streets of Philadelphia – Bruce Springsteen
Roads – Portishead
Basin Street Blues – Louis Armstrong
Pull Up To The Bumper – Grace Jones
Farther Up The Road – Bobby ‘Blue’ Bland
Highway 61 Revisited – Bob Dylan
Penny Lane – The Beatles
Road To Nowhere – Talking Heads
Highway Star – Deep Purple
Walking Down Madison – Kirsty MacColl
Baker Street – Gerry Rafferty
On the Sunny Side Of The Street – Dinah Washington
The Hard Road – Hilltop Hoods
The Road To Hell – Chris Rea
I Drove All Night – Roy Orbison
Boulevard of Broken Dreams – Green Day
Lonely Avenue – Ray Charles
Road Runner – Junior Walker and the Allstars
Ventura Highway – America
Creeque Alley – The Mamas & the Papas
Hit The Road Jack – Ray Charles & The Stray Cats
Car Wheels On A Gravel Road – Lucinda Williams
The Long And Winding Road – The Beatles
Next week: HAIR

Listen to Lyn McCarthy at the Theme Park on BayFM, Tuesdays 2-4pm, Sydney time
Also streaming on http://www.bayfm.org

Tragically also on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/maccalyn

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WALKING & RUNNING

As a penance for my birthday indulgence last week, our theme this time was WALKING & RUNNING. ‘Cause a little bit of exercise never hurt anyone, now did it? Still, I think painting the town red must have still been on my mind as we opened the program with Lou Reed’s WALK ON THE WILD SIDE, from the 1972 album Transformer. It was produced by David Bowie who also sang backing vocals.

Here in Byron Bay, ‘doing the lighthouse walk’ is a daily excursion for some people. So, Kate Bush’s RUNNING UP THAT HILL was dedicated to them. It’s a great one to put on your iPod if you’re one of those mad people who walk or run as your preferred form of exercise.

Now you all know I love my Motown. So, WALK AWAY RENEE, released in 1968 by the Four Tops, was a given.  As was NOWHERE TO RUN, a signature tune for Martha Reeves & The Vandellas, that was released way back in 1965. Check out this video clip from the same year. What to say about the back up dancers? OMG, the outfits, the dance moves!!!

Annie Lennox contributed WALKING ON BROKEN GLASS (ouch!) and then it was another true classic: Johnny Cash singing I WALK THE LINE and to round out the triple play beautifully, it was Fats Domino with I’M WALKING. Although it’s not the version we played on the show, take a look at this great clip of Fats Domino performing the song with Ricky Nelson. A great combination. And who is that saxophone player? Brilliant.

A little bit of UB40 followed with DON’T WALK ON THE GRASS and then it was Rufus Thomas with one of his biggest hits, WALKING THE DOG.

Empire of the Sun walked away with lots of awards for their debut album, WALKING ON A DREAM and the song of the same name was perfect for our show this week. As was Raphael Saadiq’s very suggestive, LET’S TAKE A WALK. Believe it or not this video, (like the song) was created in 2008. I’m loving the retro feel.

One for all the sleepwalkers – the brilliant R&B  voice of Berna Dean singing I WALK IN MY SLEEP. Then it was Jimmy Rogers with WALKING BY MYSELF and a request from Judi, listening in Cairns: Patsy Cline’s I GO WALKING AFTER MIDNIGHT.

Did you know that John Lennon disowned the song RUN FOR YOUR LIFE from the Rubber Soul album? He eventually wrote a much more politically correct tune called JEALOUS GUY. But hey, we live dangerously at the Theme Park, so RUN FOR YOUR LIFE it was.   We  followed with Steve Winwood and the Spencer Davis Group’s very appropriate, (if you were one of the Beatles’ girlfriends anyway), KEEP ON RUNNING. Check out the very young Steve Winwood in this clip. So cute.

It’s impossible NOT to sing along to WALKING ON SUNSHINE by Katrina and the Waves. It’s such an optimistic, sunny song that suits the fabulous Summer weather we are having here in beautiful Byron Bay.

WALK A MILE IN MY SHOES by  Joe South and The Believers is a great song as is WALK ON from, none other than, Mr Roy Orbison.  Then it was the incorrigible Tom Waits with WALKING SPANISH from my favourite album of his, Rain Dogs.

More R&B was on the agenda with the great Sam Cooke and I’LL COME RUNNING BACK TO YOU. He would have been 79  this week (January 22). Sadly he died at 33 years of age, in a shooting incident. He is quite rightly considered one of the pioneers and founders of soul music.

A couple of ballads that couldn’t be omitted from our show on WALKING & RUNNING are YOU’LL NEVER WALK ALONE by Gerry & The Pacemakers, (remember them?) and Dionne Warwick’s WALK ON BY.

Jack, in Sydney, requested WALK THIS WAY, from Run DMC and Aerosmith. Excellent choice. Love the combination of hard rock and hip-hop. There should be more of it, I say.

Then it was time for some Blues:  One of my favourites from last year’s Byron Bay Blues Festival was Seasick Steve, so I was happy to play WALKING MAN from his album, I Started Out With Nothin’ And I Still Got Most Of It Left. Then it was  John Lee Hooker with RUN ON and James Taylor covering Jnr Walker and the Allstars’ I’M A ROAD RUNNER.

Grace Jones is unique. She does an amazing version of WALKING IN THE RAIN, originally recorded by Australian band Flash and the Pan. You’ll find it on her  Nightclubbing album, released in 1981.

A show on WALKING & RUNNING wouldn’t be the same without Creedence Clearwater Revival’s hit, RUN THROUGH THE JUNGLE. Or The Modern Lovers’ ROADRUNNER. Or The Bangles’ WALK LIKE AN EGYPTIAN. But my favourite from this week’s show has to be an oldie but a goodie, Helen Shapiro’s WALKING BACK TO HAPPINESS. Can you believe that she was only 14 when she recorded this in 1961? Wow.

Next week, the show falls on Australia Day so I have no choice but to play some of my favourite Australian tracks. Tune in then if you like your music homegrown or are hoping for some appropriate tunes to compliment your Australia Day party.

And in signing off, I offer you this wonderful piece of graffiti that came to my attention this week: “Be happy today. Why wait?”

Here’s this week’s playlist:

Walk on the Wild Side – Lou Reed
Running Up That Hill – Kate Bush
Nowhere To Run – Martha Reeves & The Vandellas
Just Walk Away Renee – The Four Tops
Walking On Broken Glass – Annie Lennox
I Walk the Line – Johnny Cash
I’m Walking – Fats Domino
Don’t Walk On the Grass – UB40
Walking The Dog – Rufus Thomas
Walking On A Dream – Empire Of The Sun
Let’s Take A Walk – Raphael Saadiq
I Walk In My Sleep – Berna Dean
Walking by Myself – Jimmy Rogers
I Go Walking After Midnight – Patsy Cline
Run For Your Life – The Beatles
Keep On Running – Steve Winwood/Spencer Davis Group
Let’s Take An Old Fashoned Walk – Frank Sinatra & Doris Day
Walking on Sunshine – Katrina and the Waves
Walk A Mile In My Shoes – Joe South & The Believers
Walk On – Roy Orbison
Walking Spanish – Tom Waits
I’ll Come Running Back To You – Sam Cooke
You Keep Runnin´Away – The Four Tops
You’ll Never Walk Alone -Gerry & The Pacemakers
Walk On By – Dionne Warwick
Walk This Way – Run DMC & Aerosmith
Walking Man – Seasick Steve
Run On – John Lee Hooker
(I’m A) Road Runner – James Taylor (Jnr Walker & Allstars cover)
Walking In The Rain – Grace Jones
Run Through The Jungle – Creedence Clearwater Revival
Roadrunner – The Modern Lovers
Walk Like an Egyptian – The Bangles
Walking Back to Happiness – Helen Shapiro
Next week: Homegrown

Listen to Lyn McCarthy at the Theme Park on BayFM, Tuesdays 2-4pm, Sydney time.

Also streaming on http://www.bayfm.org

Tragically also on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/maccalyn


DUETS

I had a lot of fun getting this week’s list together because there’s just so much to choose from when it comes to DUETS. We opened with the perfectly pitched IT TAKES TWO from Marvin Gaye & Kim Weston. The hit single was released in 1966 on Motown’s Tamla label.

Iggy Pop and Deborah Harry do an amazing job with WELL DID YOU EVAH. Who would have thought that Cole Porter’s quaint double act from the film High Society,originally sung by Bing Crosby and Frank Sinatra, would be handled so well by two punk icons? Here’s a treat: a video created by director Alex Cox (“Sid & Nancy”), that incorporates some of High Society/Frank & Bing with Iggy and Deb’s version. Great stuff:

We followed with the  hilariously argumentative Otis Redding and Carla Thomas with TRAMP and then some more Marvin Gaye, this time with Tammi Terrell. Until Tammi’s  death from a brain tumour in 1970, she and Marvin Gaye were regarded as Motown’s perfect pairing. Choosing the “best” of Gaye’s duets with Terrell is a little crazy, but I chose REAL THING over the much covered ‘Aint No Mountain High Enough’ which seems to get enough exposure without my help.

Time then for a boy on boy duet: Freddy Mercury and David Bowie’s anxious little melodrama, UNDER PRESSURE.  Born out of an impromptu jam session, it evolved into one of the most inspiring musical moments of the 1980s.

Dusty Springfield and the Pet Shop Boys’ rendition of  WHAT HAVE I DONE TO DESERVE THIS? helped revive Dusty’s career in the U.S. when it was released in 1987. We followed with SOMETIMES ALWAYS from Jim Reid of the Jesus and Mary Chain and his singing partner Hope Sandoval from Mazzy Star. Here’s a clip of them performing live at the MTV studios:

Let’s face it, country music is the spiritual home of the duet.  Two great examples: Nancy Sinatra and Lee Hazlewood with the wonderful and haunting SOME VELVET MORNING and  JACKSON from Johnny Cash and June Carter.

Iggy Pop seems to love to duet. Last week he featured with Peaches and this week he turns up twice; this time with Kate Pierson of the B-52s. The song?  CANDY is the tale of an ex-con reaching out to his lost love after 20 years. It makes brilliant use of Iggy’s sly, world-weary baritone and Pierson’s sunny tones. The result is an modern-rock classic. Take a look:

PJ Harvey and Thom Yorke, of Radiohead, offered up THIS MESS WE’RE IN. It’s kind of what you would expect from these two isn’t it?  Profoundly gloomy and yet impossibly beautiful. Peter Gabriel with Kate Bush aren’t quite as melancholic as she gives Pete some great lifestyle tips on their gorgeous duet DON’T GIVE UP.

Another wonderful duet is COME ON OVER,  from Isobel Campbell (ex Belle & Sebastien) and Mark Langegan (ex Queens of the Stone Age).  Qualifies for probably the sexiest song on the list this week.

The Youssou N’Dour & Neneh Cherry track  SEVEN SECONDS was a huge worldwide hit in 1994. The song is about the first seven seconds in a child’s life, when he or she is totally unaware of the problems and violence in the world. A timeless classic:

Gram Parsons and Emmylou Harris cover Roy Orbison’s LOVE HURTS and do a pretty good job of it but we had to have the real thing and the stand-out duet has to be Roy Orbison and kd lang with, of course, CRYING. Now you didn’t think I’d leave that one out did you?

Another goodie that takes a more optimistic viewpoint of partnerships: Chrissie Hynde performing I’VE GOT YOU BABE with UB40. This cover of Sonny & Cher’s signature tune was recorded in 1985 and reached #1 in the UK that year, as did the original 20 years earlier.

Stevie Nicks and Tom Petty do a great version of STOP DRAGGIN MY HEART AROUND and Tina Turner and Brian Adams aren’t half bad either with their cover of Robert Palmer’s ADDICTED TO LOVE.

We followed with a brilliant triple-play: Ray Charles and Gladys Knight with HEAVEN HELP US ALL from the Genius Loves Company album, the great Jackie Wilson and Laverne Baker with THINK TWICE and Al Green and Lyle Lovett singing FUNNY HOW TIME SLIPS AWAY. Here’s proof positive that white men from Texas do have soul:

Another terrific triple play: Johnny Cash and Bob Dylan with ONE TOO MANY MORNINGS followed by Nick  Cave and Kylie Minogue with WHERE THE WILD ROSES GROW and the piece de resistance, in my book, Jack White and Loretta Lynn with PORTLAND OREGAN from Loretta’s amazing album Van Lear Rose. Love the album, love this song, love this clip:

But when it came to closing the show I couldn’t go past a piece of music that sums up, what has to be, a perfect pairing: Louis Armstrong and Ella Fitzgerald singing DANCING CHEEK TO CHEEK. Recorded in 1957 and accompanied by the Oscar Petersen trio and Buddy Rich on drums, you can’t listen to this song without smiling. As the song goes “Heaven, I’m in heaven….”

Next week’s show falls on the 12th of January – My Birthday!  Yes I’m a Capricorn, just like Elvis, David Bowie, Annie Lennox …. Ah ha, I’m in great company. So in honour of all of us having birthdays, next week’s theme is GOING OUT AND PARTYING. Send me your suggestions.

Thanks for all your support this year. Have a wonderful 2010! Here’s this week’s playlist:

It Takes Two – Marvin Gaye & Kim Weston
Well Did You Evah – Deborah Harry & Iggy Pop
Tramp – Otis Redding & Carla Thomas
Ain’t Nothing Like The Real Thing – Marvin Gaye and Tammi Terrell
Under Pressure – Freddy Mercury & David Bowie
What Have I Done To Deserve This? – Pet Shop Boys & Dusty Springfield
Sometimes Always – The Jesus And Mary Chain (Jim Reid)/Hope Sandoval
Musica Cubana Duo de Pianos – Bebo & Chucho Valdés
Some Velvet Morning – Nancy Sinatra & Lee Hazlewood
Jackson – Johnny Cash & June Carter
Candy – Iggy Pop & Kate Pierson
This Mess We’re In – PJ Harvey & Thom Yorke (of Radiohead)
Don’t Give Up – Peter Gabriel & Kate Bush
Come On Over – Isobel Campbell And Mark Lanegan
Seven Seconds – Youssou N’Dour & Neneh Cherry
Love Hurts – Gram Parsons & Emmylou Harris
Crying – Roy Orbison & kd lang
I Got You Babe – UB40 With Chrissy Hynde
Stop Draggin’ My Heart Around – Stevie Nicks & Tom Petty
Addicted To Love (Live) – Tina Turner/Brian Adams
Think Twice. – Jackie Wilson & Laverne Baker
Funny How Time Slips Away – Al Green & Lyle Lovett
Heaven Help Us All – Ray Charles & Gladys Knight
One Too Many Mornings – Bob Dylan & Johnny Cash
Where The Wild Roses Grow – Nick Cave & Kylie Minogue
Portland Oregon – Jack White/Loretta Lynn
Haunted – Shane MacGowan and Sinead O’Connor
Dancing Cheek to Cheek – Louis Armstrong and Ella Fitzgerald

Next week: GOING OUT AND PARTYING

Listen to Lyn McCarthy at the Theme Park on BayFM, Tuesdays 2-4pm, Sydney time.

Also streaming on http://www.bayfm.org

Tragically also on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/maccalyn


THE BIG ‘O’

Anyone who listens to the show on a regular basis knows that I adore Roy Orbison and this is why: First there’s the voice. It transcends generations by singing of universal longings that touch the heart. His voice sends quivers through my spine: part country, part rock and part pop, it’s a voice that reaches something approaching perfection.

Then there are the songs: a world defined by dreams yet rooted in reality, songs that teach us something about our own vulnerability. Songs of loss and desire and loneliness and, yes, songs about love.

Roy Orbison was born on April 23, 1936 in Vernon Texas,  the middle son of Orbie Lee Orbison, an oil well driller and car mechanic, and Nadine Shultz, a nurse. He was creating music as young as 6 or 7. We played interviews throughout the program, many from Roy himself and he covered his childhood, learning guitar from his father and uncle, his time at Sun Records, why he started wearing sunglasses on stage and whether he was really lonely, amongst other things. Rather than repeat all that here, let me remind you that you can listen to the Theme Park wherever you are by using your internet connection. Go to http://www.bayfm.org and press the listen button.   You should hear the show in real time via your iTunes or other media player. Theme Park airs on Tuesdays 2-4pm (that’s Sydney, Australia time).

So back to the music.  First up it was OOBIE DOOBIE, recorded with the Teen Kings in 1956. We followed with CLAUDETTE, a song about Orbson’s first wife, Claudette Frady. The track was recorded in 1958. Claudette died tragically in a motocycle accident in 1966. We followed with ONLY THE LONELY written by Roy Orbison and Joe Melson and recorded by Orbison in 1960; it was his first major hit. Here he is performing in Australia in the 60’s:

Then it was a great triple play: BLUE ANGEL, I’M HURTIN’ and RUNNING SCARED. We also included the song LOVE HURTS,  originally recorded by the Everly Brothers in 1960. Roy Orbison’s version was issued as the B-side to RUNNING SCARED which was a #1 hit, in 1961. Here’s a rare clip of Roy and his band, The Candymen, taken from a Dutch Tv Show from 1965. The concert was from the Singer Concert Zaal in Laren, Holland, during their European tour.

We had to include the next three songs from the early sixties: CANDY MAN, DREAM BABY, (about the birth of his second son with Claudette)  and WORKING FOR THE MAN – a song about a Summer he worked in the Texan oil fields alongside his father.

By 1963 Orbison was touring extensively throughout the UK, Europe and Australia with The Beatles, The Stones and the Beach Boys. We played a  couple of love ballads from that  era: FALLING and IT’S OVER.

Roy also filled us in on his time, while on tour,  with the Rolling Stones and how PRETTY WOMAN influenced them to write Satisfaction. PRETTY WOMAN, of course, went on to be a big hit and was destined to become Orbison’s signature song. Here’s a great piece of kitch from the 70’s: An American TV variety show called Pink Lady and Jeff. Pink Lady was a popular singing duo from Japan brought to America for the show.  Comedian Jeff Altman was the cohost. Worth watching just to see Roy struggling to keep a straight face and also for the 70’s fashion.

I rarely dedicate a whole show to one performer. The only other time was a tribute to Michael Jackson. But, in my opinion, Orbison is one of the great rock and rollers: a forceful, yet gentle, voice capable of dynamic crescendos. He sang both heartbroken ballads and bluesy rock numbers, running up a formidable hit streak in the early Sixties. From the release of ONLY THE LONELY in 1960 to PRETTY WOMAN,  a span of four years, Orbison cracked the Top Ten nine times.

Orbison’s most memorable performances were lovelorn melodramas, in which he emoted in a brooding tremulous voice. The melancholy in his songs resonated with listeners of all ages.  IT’S OVER is one great example of that style. Another is CRYING. It was great to hear how he came to write that song and we listened to the version he re-recorded with kd lang in 1987.  It went on to win them a Grammy Award.

After his first wife Claudette’s death in 1966, Orbison threw himself into work, which included starring in the film THE FASTEST GUITAR ALIVE, and he continued to tour. In the late 1960s, however, music was very much a part of the psychedelic movement. Orbison felt lost, later saying “[I] didn’t hear a lot I could relate to so I kind of stood there like a tree where the winds blow and the seasons change, and you’re still there and you bloom again.”

During a tour of England in 1968 he received news that his home in Tennessee had burned down and his two eldest sons had died. The property was sold to Johnny Cash, who planted an orchard on it. On March 25, 1969, Orbison married his second wife, Barbara Jacobs, and they had two children of their own.

During the 70’s several artists released covers of Orbison’s songs that performed very well. LOVE HURTS was remade by Gram Parsons and Emmylou Harris, and again by heavy metal band Nazareth and Sonny James sent ONLY THE LONELY to # 1 on the country music charts.

Linda Ronstadt covered BLUE BAYOU in 1977, which went to No. 3 and stayed on the charts for 24 weeks. And later that year, Orbison and Emmylou Harris won a Grammy Award for their duet THAT LOVIN’ YOU FEELIN’ AGAIN. WAYMORES BLUES is from the Class of 55 album with Roy Orbison, Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis and Carl Perkins. While the album was in part a tribute to Elvis Presley, it was mainly a commemoration of those young performing hopefuls who came to Sun Records  in 1955 to make music in the new era o Rock and Roll.

During the 80’s Orbison participated in a number of movie soundtracks. We played two of the most prominent: LIFE FADES AWAY from the film Less Than Zero, starring Robert Downie Jnr and IN DREAMS, from the controversial film by David Lynch, BLUE VELVET.

Orbison’s return to the public eye really began in earnest in 1987 with his induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and the taping of a tribute concert, Black and White Night. The concert featured such disciples as Bruce Springsteen, Elvis Costello, kd lang and Bonnie Raitt and was produced by T. Bone Burnett. Here’s a clip from the DVD. The song is UPTOWN.

It was a great pleasure to include a 7 minute interview with members of the supergroup of all supergroups: THE TRAVELLING WILBURYS: Roy Orbison, Bob Dylan, Tom Petty, Jeff Lynne and George Harrison. The year was 1988. We also included the song, HANDLE WITH CARE, from the album The Travelling Wilburys Vol 1.

In the same year Orbison was recording a major comeback album, Mystery Girl. It was awaiting release when Orbison suddenly died of a heart attack on December 6, 1988.  The album was finalized for release in the weeks following his death through the collaborative efforts of several artists who were all friends and admirers. The album, MYSTERY GIRL, was named after the chorus from the track SHE’S A MYSTERY TO ME, written for Orbison by U2’s Bono and The Edge.

The album was released posthumously in 1989 and would join Travelling Wilburys Vol 1 on the Billboard chart. The dual success meant that Roy Orbison joined Elvis Presley as the only two singers to simultaneously have two Top 5 albums on the Billboard chart posthumously, at that time. (This record has now been smashed by Michael Jackson who dominated the Billboard Top 10 albums when he passed away this year).

But back to Roy: Mystery Girl was extremely well received and went on to become the highest-charting album of his career. We took a listen to SHE’S A MYSTERY TO ME and YOU’VE GOT IT from that album. Rather than show a performance clip, take a look at Bono and others talking about the writing and recording process of the album. Roy sings SHE’S A MYSTERY TO ME as background to the story.

There was time for more of Roy commenting on how he would like to be remembered: “I’d just like to be remembered. If my contribution to the music scene brought someone some happiness or helped them keep things together, then that would be great.” A medley of some of Roy’s best loved tunes then closed the show: I DROVE ALL NIGHT, OH PRETTY WOMAN, LANA and HEARTBREAK RADIO.

When Elvis Presley stated that Roy Orbison is “The world’s greatest singer”, we know that he wasn’t kidding, that’s for sure.

Next week: We’re going back to THE SUMMER OF LOVE. Yes, its all love beads, incense, tambourines and the great music of the Summer of 67. Peace man.Contact me if you have any suggestions. Meanwhile, here is this week’s playlist:

Childhood – Roy Orbison Interview

Ooby Dooby – Roy Orbison Interview

Ooby Dooby  –  Roy Orbison

Claudette – Roy Orbison

Only The Lonely – Roy Orbison

Loneliness – Roy Orbison Interview

Blue Angel – Roy Orbison

I’m Hurtin’ – Roy Orbison

Running Scared – Roy Orbison

Love Hurts – Roy Orbison

Candy Man – Roy Orbison

Dream Baby – Roy Orbison

Working For The Man – Roy Orbison

Leah – Roy Orbison

Sunglasses – Roy Orbison

Mean Woman Blues – Roy Orbison

Falling – Roy Orbison

It’s Over – Roy Orbison

Oh, Pretty Woman – Roy Orbison

Crying – Roy Orbison interview

Crying – Roy Orbison & kd lang

Blue Bayou – Linda Ronstadt

That Lovin’ You Feelin’ Again – Roy Orbison with Emmylou Harris

Waymore’s Blues – Roy Orbison with Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis and Carl Perkins (Class of 55)

Life Fades Away – Roy Orbison

In Dreams – Roy Orbison

Uptown – Roy Orbison

Travelling Wilburys  interview

Handle With Care -Traveling Wilburys

She’s A Mystery To Me – Roy Orbison

You Got It – Roy Orbison

Being Remembered – Roy Orbison interview

Medley: I Drove All Night/Oh, Pretty Woman/Lana/Heartbreak Radio – Roy Orbison

Next week: SUMMER OF LOVE (1967)

Listen to Lyn McCarthy at the Theme Park on BayFM, Tuesdays 2-4pm, Sydney time.
Also streaming on http://www.bayfm.org
Tragically also on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/maccalyn


SONGS ABOUT ELVIS

You may be surprised at the scope of this week’s topic because when it comes to Elvis Presley, well nearly everyone’s got an opinion. The iconic nature of Elvis Presley in music and popular culture, has often made him a subject of, or a benchmark, in numerous songs. We launched the show with CALLING ELVIS by Dire Straits. Written by Mark Knopler and released in 1991, the song is about an Elvis fan that can’t believe that Elvis Presley is dead. Based on some of the bizarre ‘sightings’ over the years, I fear he is not alone.

A song from one of my favourite films followed: Public Enemy’s groundbreaking FIGHT THE POWER from the soundtrack of DO THE RIGHT THING, directed by Spike Lee in 1989. Like the film, the song broke at a crucial period in America’s struggle with race. Unabashedly political, FIGHT THE POWER was confrontational in the way that great rock has always been. It attacks a whole roster of American icons including Elvis and John Wayne in what amounts to a virtual flag burning. Because who better embodies the American ideal than the King? The song goes so far as to call Elvis racist. I don’t agree with that. But what I do know from the National Archives is that in 1970 Elvis wrote a six-page letter to Richard Nixon asking him to make him a ‘Federal Agent-At-Large’ in the Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs. And amongst the gifts that Elvis presented to the then President was a Colt-45 pistol. So what do we make of all this? Maybe only that, like a lot of his countrymen, Elvis was a misguided patriot who defended the nation’s order – an order from which blacks, in particular, had been routinely barred. The irony, of course, is that Elvis was the first artist to successfully blend black and white music: country music and the blues. And didn’t he do it well?

It was time for a change of tone: The very whimsical and wonderful Kirsty McColl with THERE’S A GUY WORKS DOWN THE CHIP SHOP SWEARS HE’S ELVIS. The song made an appearance on the FAMOUS PEOPLE show, but definitely deserved another spin. We followed with Richard Thompson’s FROM GALWAY TO GRACELAND.

Robbie Williams’ ADVERTISING SPACE is a song not only about Elvis but, also, about the price of fame.  Emmylou Harris followed with BOY FROM TUPELO. In case you weren’t aware Elvis was born in Tupelo Mississipi on January 8, 1935. And then it was the great Roy Orbison with HOUND DOG MAN.

Living Colour funked it up with their critique of the tabloids. The song  ELVIS IS DEAD ups the ante with an appearance by Little Richard. Check it out.

We dived into the second hour of the program with Ann Margret singing the title song of the film BYE BYE BIRDIE. Based on the stage musical of the same name, the story was inspired by Elvis Presley being drafted into the US Army in 1957. Jesse Pearson played the role of teen idol Conrad Birdie, whose character’s name is a wordplay on another singer of the era, Conway Twitty.  The film is credited with making Ann-Margret a superstar during the mid-1960s, leading to her appearing with Elvis Presley in Viva Las Vegas in 1964.

A couple of great songs were suggested to me by BayFM’s very own Cowboy Sweetheart, Carrie D. First up, Bap Kennedy with GLADYS & VERNON about Elvis’s parents and the night that Elvis was born. And then it was the great Waylon Jennings with the very entertaining NOBODY KNOWS.

I absolutely adore BLACK VELVET by Allanah Myles and have played that before. But, hey, when a song’s as good as this one it deserves a replay!

U2’s song ELVIS ATE AMERICA illustrates the many personas of Elvis, both good and bad. And then it was the romantically delusional Scouting For Girls with ELVIS ISN’T DEAD: “Elvis isn’t dead ’cause I heard him on the radio….. and you’re coming back to me.”  Yeah, sure guys.

Time to get serious: First up, Kate Bush with her hit song about Elvis – KING OF THE MOUNTAIN. And then, Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds transported us into a disturbing world with their song about the night that Elvis was born. Elvis was a twin but his brother was still-born. The song is TUPELO from the album THE FIRSTBORN IS DEAD. Here’s the totally mesmerising clip:

John Fogarty likens Elvis to the BIG TRAIN (FROM MEMPHIS). Neil Young reminded us that it’s “better to burn out than to fade away “, with his song MY, MY, HEY HEY.

Another of my faves followed: Cowboy Junkies with BLUE MOON REVISITED, otherwise known as SONG FOR ELVIS. And then it was Paul Simon’s song about travelling to Elvis Presley’s home, GRACELAND, with the Everly Brothers helping out on vocals. Don’t have a clip with the Everlys in it, but you can’t do much better than this concert performance of the song in Zimbabwe. Enjoy.

There was time for a little more mjusic dedicated to Elvis before signing off and what better than ELVIS HAS JUST LEFT THE BUILDING by the one and only Frank Zappa. And, of course, I had to play some of the King himself so we went out with BURNIN’ LOVE. Here’s what all the fuss is about:

Next week’s show will be dedicated to the patron saint of Theme Park, Roy Orbison, who died 21 years ago this December 6. So songs by Roy Orbison, The Travelling Wilburys, duets with Roy and covers of Roy Orbison songs. Anything connected to Roy Orbison qualifies. Personally I can’t wait!

Here’s this week’s playlist:

Calling Elvis – Dire Straits
Fight The Power – Public Enemy
There’s a guy works down the chip shop swears he’s Elvis – Kirsty McColl
From Galway to Graceland – Richard Thompson
Advertising Space – Robbie Williams
Boy From Tupelo – Emmylou Harris
Hound Dog Man – Roy Orbison
King’s Call – Phil Lynott
Elvis Is Dead – Living Colour
I Saw Elvis In A UFO – Ray Stevens
My Boy Elvis  – Janis Martin
Bye Bye Birdie – Ann-Margret
Gladys and Vernon – Bap Kennedy
Nobody Knows – Waylon Jennings
Black Velvet  – Alannah Myles
Elvis Ate America – U2
Elvis isn’t Dead – Scouting For Girls
King Of The Mountain – Kate Bush
Tupelo  – Nick Cave And The Bad Seeds
Big Train (From Memphis) – John Fogarty
My My, Hey Hey (Out Of The Blue) – Neil Young
Blue Moon Revisited (Song for Elvis) – Cowboy Junkies
Graceland – Paul Simon
Elvis Has Just Left The Building – Frank Zappa
Burning Love – Elvis Presley
Next week: Tribute to Roy Orbison

Listen to Lyn McCarthy at the Theme Park on BayFM, Tuesdays 2-4pm, Sydney time.
Also streaming on http://www.bayfm.org
Tragically also on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/maccalyn

UNREQUITED LOVE

Image0001Most love stories are about people who fall in love with each other. But what about the one-sided love affair? If we were rational we’d acknowledge that its simply addictive emotional masochism; the more unsuitable or unattainable the object of desire, the stronger the fascination.  But when you’re madly in love with someone who doesn’t know you exist, being rational is the furthest thing from your mind. We’ve all been there. You feel like the walking wounded, the unloved one, the handicapped without the advantage of a great parking space! Charlie Brown says it best: “Nothing takes the taste out of peanut butter like UNREQUITED LOVE.”

We opened the show with THE GIRL FROM IPANEMA from one of the best bossa nova singers ever,  Astrud Gilberto, performing with Joao Gilberto and Stan Getz. There really was a girl from Ipanema – a 15 year old called Heloisa Pinto who used to walk past the Rio bar frequented by the songwriters,Vinicius Morais and Antonio Jobim.  The song is a sweet tribute to the totally unattainable as well as an ode to youth. This music video is from the 1964 film “Get Yourself a College Girl”:

KILLING ME SOFTLY WITH HIS SONG has been covered by many artists, most notably by Roberta Flack, whose 1973 version topped the U.S. pop singles charts and won a Grammy Award. We opted to play the equally successful 1996 version, simply called KILLING ME SOFTLY,  by Hip-Hop group The Fugees with Lauryn Hill on lead vocals.

200px-Dolly_Parton_I_willWhitney Houston’s version of I WILL ALWAYS LOVE YOU, released in 1992,  became one of the best-selling singles of all time. It was written and originally recorded by Dolly Parton and her poignant and bittersweet version, with Parton’s trademark twang,  was my choice this week.

220px-Billy_Bragg_shot_by_Kris_KrugI had to include Billy Bragg’s gentle, yet disturbing, song about a classroom crush, THE SATURDAY BOY, even if it was just for the line: ”I had to look in the dictionary/ To find out the meaning of unrequited.” The Violent Femmes’ upped the ante with a song about repressed lust.  ADD IT UP has Gordon Gano promising himself, ‘the day after today I will stop’, but the music’s pent-up passion suggests otherwise.

When I announced this week’s theme there was lots of correspondence regarding which genre of Temptationsmusic does ‘unrequited love’ best. Yes, I agree with BayFM’s Cowboy Sweetheart that country singers have it pretty much all sewn up, but you can’t go past a little soul music when it comes to love songs, requited or not.  A couple of examples: JUST MY IMAGINATION from the Temptations and CUPID from Sam Cooke. And I didn’t forget the soulful sound of Ray Charles with YOU DON’T KNOW ME, delivering a duet with Diana Krall, from his Genius Loves Company album.

Joe Jackson is wonderfully incredulous when he asks: IS SHE REALLY GOING OUT WITH HIM? The Cars, on the other hand,  are obsessed with their BEST FRIEND’S GIRL while  Bowling For Soup are going nuts over the  GIRL ALL THE BAD BOYS WANT. I love a band with a sense of humour. Check out the video from Bowling For Soup. By the way, the band’s name was derived from a comedy act by Steve Martin.

Now if you need convincing that country singers are the kings and queens of the lovelorn, here’s Patsy Cline with I FALL TO PIECES, from the Glenn Reeves Show, February 23, 1963.

LAYLA by the Eric Clapton’s group, Derek & The Dominos, is a tale of unrequited love inspired by Clapton’s relationship with his friend George Harrison’s then wife, Pattie Boyd Harrison. Here’s a video clip from 1984 of Eric Clapton peforming the song live with Bill Wyman on bass, Charlie Watts on drums, Jeff Beck on guitar, Stevie Winwood on piano …. have I died and gone to heaven? 

A song that elevates lovelorn moping to operatic heights is Ben E King’s I WHO HAVE NOTHING and another, possibly,  is Dionne Warwick’s WALK ON BY, written by Burt Bacharach and David Hal. It was recorded by Warwick in 1964 and became a landmark single for her.

A year later Donovan released his first single, CATCH THE WIND, and in 1967 The Small Faces recorded TIN SOLDIER, a song Steve Marriott wrote to his first wife Jenny. The song signalled a return to the band’s R&B roots after their previous forays into psychedelic rock and other musical experiments. P.P. Arnold can be heard singing back up vocals. Here’s some rare footage of The Small Faces with P.P. Arnold performing on Belgium television. The year was 1968. Go the Mods!

Written by the Bee Gees, IF I CAN’T HAVE YOU was given to Yvonne Elliman when the group became involved in the soundtrack for the 1977 film Saturday Night Fever. She scored  a #1 hit in the US with the track. 

Going a bit further back in time is the Everly Brothers version of ALL I HAVE TO DO IS DREAM. Recorded in 1958, it was recorded in just two takes and features Chet Atkins on guitar. The B side “Claudette” was the first major songwriting success for Roy Orbison. Two years later, Orbison recorded ONLY THE LONELY, his first major hit. An operatic rock ballad, it was a sound unheard of at the time, described by the New York Times as expressing “a clenchied, driven urgency.” Here’s Roy performing the song during the Black & White Night concert. No-one does it like the Big O.

From the sublime to the ridiculous:  a teenager falls in love with a pin-up girl, in a picture dated 1929, in The Who’s PICTURES OF LILY and Fountains of Wayne sing about a schoolboy’s lust for his friends mother in STACEY’S MUM

And then it was a couple of classics: FOR NO ONE from The Beatles Revolver album, written by Paul McCartney and a track from one of my all-time favourite albums,  I’M WAITING FOR THE DAY from the Beach Boys Pet Sounds album.

In an effort to shake the lovelorn out of the doldrums, we closed the show with Radiohead’s masterpiece of poetic self-loathing, CREEP.

Here’s the complete playlist:

 

The Girl from Ipanema 5:24 Astrud Gilberto / João Gilberto / Stan Getz Pure Jazz Jazz Latin 2
Killing Me Softly (orig. Roberta Flack) 4:43 The Fugees The Score Hip-Hop 2
I Will Always Love You 3:04 Dolly Parton Country 2
Diary 3:08 Bread The Best Of Bread Classic Rock 3
The Saturday Boy 3:28 Billy Bragg Back To Basics Alternative 2
Add It Up (language) 4:44 Violent Femmes Violent Femmes Alternative 2
Cupid 2:32 Sam Cooke R&B 9
Just My Imagination (Running Away With Me) 3:48 The Temptations ’71 My Girl: The Very Best Of The Temptations [Disc 2] Motown 5
You Don’t Know Me 3:55 Ray Charles & Diana Krall Genius Loves Company Easy Listening 4
Strange And Beautiful (I’ll Put A Spell On You) 3:30 Aqualung (Matt Hales) Rock Ballad 1
Is She Really Going Out With Him 3:35 Joe Jackson Greatest Hits Pop 4
My Best Friend’s Girl 3:44 The Cars The Cars Rock 2
Girl All the Bad Boys Want 3:18 Bowling For Soup Now That’s What I Call Music 53 Alternative
White Flag 3:35 Dido Pop 2
My Eyes Adored You 3:34 Frankie Valli  & the Four Seasons Easy Listening 6
I Fall To Pieces 2:52 Patsy Cline Sweet Dreams Country 1
Layla (1990) 7:04 Derek & The Dominos (Eric Clapton) Goodfellas/Scorsese (1990) Rock 6
I’ll Kill Her (2008) 3:52 SoKo EP 1 Alternative & Punk 3
I Who Have Nothing 2:25 Ben E. King & Percy Sledge & Brook Benton R&B 5
Walk On By 2:58 Dionne Warwick The Dionne Warwick Collection Easy Listening 4
Catch The Wind 2:21 Donovan British Invasion Vol. 2 Folk 8
Tin Soldier 3:19 Small Faces The The Woodstock Generation: Out of Time Rock 1
If I Can’t Have You 3:01 Yvonne Elliman Saturday Night Fever – The Ori Disco 2
All I Have To Do Is Dream 2:22 The Everly Brothers Rock/country 2
Only The Lonely 2:27 Roy Orbison The Essential Roy Orbison (Disc 1) Rock 8
Pictures Of Lily 2:45 The Who The Ultimate Collection Rock 5
Stacey’s Mom 3:18 Fountains of Wayne Welcome Interstate Managers Pop 6
For No One 2:02 The Beatles Revolver Pop 2
I’m Waiting For The Day 3:06 The Beach Boys Pet Sounds [Bonus Tracks] Rock 2
Creep (language) 3:57 Radiohead Pablo Honey Rock 6

The Girl from Ipanema – Astrud Gilberto / João Gilberto / Stan Getz

Killing Me Softly  – The Fugees

I Will Always Love You – Dolly Parton

Diary – Bread

The Saturday Boy – Billy Bragg

Add It Up  – Violent Femmes

Cupid – Sam Cooke

Just My Imagination  – The Temptations 

You Don’t Know MeRay Charles & Diana Krall

Strange And Beautiful (I’ll Put A Spell On You) –  Aqualung

Is She Really Going Out With Him Joe Jackson

My Best Friend’s Girl The Cars

Girl All the Bad Boys WantBowling For Soup

White Flag Dido

My Eyes Adored You Frankie Valli  & the Four Seasons

I Fall To Pieces Patsy Cline

Layla Derek & The Dominos 

I’ll Kill Her – SoKo

I Who Have Nothing Ben E. King 

Walk On By Dionne Warwick

Catch The Wind Donovan

Tin Soldier The Small Faces 

If I Can’t Have You Yvonne Elliman

All I Have To Do Is Dream The Everly Brothers

Only The Lonely Roy Orbison

Pictures Of Lily The Who

Stacey’s Mom Fountains of Wayne

For No One The Beatles

I’m Waiting For The Day The Beach Boys

Creep Radiohead

Next week, we’re celebrating Halloween with SCARY SONGS FOR SILLY PEOPLE (or is that SILLY SONGS FOR SCARY PEOPLE?).  Suggestions welcome.

Listen to Lyn McCarthy at the Theme Park on BayFM, Tuesdays 2-4pm, Sydney time.  

Also streaming on http://www.bayfm.org

Tragically also on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/maccalyn

GREAT COVERS

So what makes a great cover? I think it’s when an artist makes a song his or her own, while still respecting the essence of the original. There are some SoundMusicexceptional covers that completely redefine a song to the point that we identify the tune with the cover artist forever more. And we had a few of those this week in our show about COVERS THAT ARE BETTER THAN THE ORIGINALS.

jazz-150-0John Coltrane transformed The Sound of Music’s perky pick me up MY FAVOURITE THINGS into something of a jazz landmark, so, as our opener,  it served as a very good example of a song that was reinvented for the listener. Another supreme example of a good cover is Ray Charles rendition of the Beatles ELEANOR RIGBY.  His powerful and  moving version uses R & B piano and gospel vocals to create something unique from what was a pretty perfect piece of pop to begin with. Check out this clip from the Dick Cavett show 1972. Loving the Raelettes moves, not to mention the pastel kaftans!

In his latter years Johnny Cash recorded a number of covers that, at first glance, seem at odds with his ‘country’ persona. None is more moving than HURT. Cash takes all the self-pity out of the Nine Inch Nails junkie confessional and turns it into an old man’s devastating deathbed testimonial. Take a look at this video clip. It’s a poignant performance that’s almost haunting, as it was created just prior to Cash’s untimely death. Whether or not you’re a Johnny Cash fan, this performance is powerful and deep with emotion. 

ALL ALONG THE WATCHTOWER from Jimi Hendrix was written, and first recorded, by Bob Dylan.  He’s one of the most-covered musicians in history for a reason: Besides writing some of the best songs of the rock era, he’s made lots of recordings that sound unfinished, even skeletal.The original of ALL ALONG THE WATCHTOWER is spine-chilling in its own strange way, but the song didn’t become a classic until Jimi Hendrix unleashed his version. Hendrix seems to channel pure myth and mystery. Of course, it wouldn’t work without Dylan’s lyrics and unsettling chords, but the Hendrix solos actually sound like wind howling and wildcats growling, don’t you think?

Canadian band, Cowboy Junkies, version of The Velvet Underground’s SWEET JANE was based on the one that was included in 1969: The Velvet Underground Live. Lou Reed himself described it as “the best and most authentic version I have ever heard”. At the risk of including way too many video clips, I have to show you this:

The Lennon/McCartney single, WE CAN WORK IT OUT, comes from the middle of The Beatles most radical creative reinvention, the 1965 shift from steviewonder13the straightforward pop of Help! To the multi-faceted Rubber Soul, which would revolutionise their music, and by extension, everybody’s else’s. So, it’s fitting that when Stevie Wonder covered the song on 1970’s Signed, Sealed & Delivered, he was in the middle of a similar transition from Motown’s teenage wunderkid to the socially conscious and superfunky artist he became in the mid 70’s. Wonder’s performance is so powerful, in fact, that it changes the meaning of the song without changing a word.

We teamed that with Ike & Tina Turner’s version of PROUD MARY. As Tina explains in the fairly subdued preface: “We never, ever do nothin’ nice and easy. We always do it nice and rough.” The Turners – and their band – then tear the intro to shreds by kicking up the tempo, adding horns and driving it all with a beat that practically demands that people dance. By comparison, Creedence Clearwater Revival’s original mid-tempo rock number sounds positively bland. 

One sure-fire way to reinvent a song is to flip the sex of the singer. Two examples of that are  Melanie’s version of the Stones’ RUBY TUESDAY and Regina Spektor’s version of John Lennon’s REAL LOVE

Another is  Janis Joplin’s cover of Roger Miller’s ME AND BOBBY MCGEE. Joplin’s version gave her the only number one single of her career and only the second posthumous number one single in rock n roll history (the first was Sittin’ on the Dock of the Bay by Otis Redding).

Back to boys on boys:   Edgar & Johnny Winter do a wonderful version of TOBACCO ROAD, recorded originally by the Nashville Teens. And idiosyncratic Melbourne performer,  C.W. Stoneking, puts a whole new spin on the White Stripes SEVEN NATION ARMY. The clip is from radio station’s Triple J’s ‘Like A Version’ series, available on CD/DVD. Wild.

My favourite number in this week’s playlist was suggested by a Sydney listener, Lynden (thank you!):  Jazz singer Patricia Barber with her interpretation of Sonny & Cher’s THE BEAT GOES ON. And then Stevie Ray Vaughan gave Jimi Hendrix a run for his money with his version of VOODOO WOMAN. 

Two of my all time favourite R&B artists followed: Al Green taking the Bee Gees ballad HOW CAN YOU MEND A BROKEN HEART to a whole new level and Aretha Franklin showing us how her version of Otis Redding’s RESPECT made it, not only an anthem for the feminist movement and the civil rights moviement, but, her very own signature song. Here’s a great little doco from Ovation TV looking at Aretha’s background and the important place that the song has in history.

English groups of the 60’s, in particular The Beatles, weren’t adverse to borrowing from the American R&B artists of the day to create some of their early hits (think of the Beatles Please Mr. Postman as an example). One R&B song that achieves a great transformation from R&B to rock is the Rolling Stones cover of the  Temptations JUST MY IMAGINATION.

Patti-Smith-799533A male rock song that benefited greatly from being sung by a woman is GLORIA. Patti Smith introduced bisexuality and religious guilt to the horny garage rock song, originally recorded by Van Morrison’s band Them.

BY THE TIME I GET TO PHOENIX was originally recorded by Jimmy Webb. Isaac Hayes takes the listener on an epic journey by re-imagining the song’s entire context so persuasively that by the time he starts actually singing, the emotional force just about knocks our socks off. 

Sometimes it’s hard to listen to any Doors song with a straight face, let alone LIGHT MY FIRE. Jackie Wilson had a bit of fun with his vastly superior version: its pure funk and I love the way Wilson punctuates it with his trademark squeals and screeches. It’s way sexier than the Doors’ psychedelic original, that’s for sure.

One of those songs that will forever be owned by the cover artist is Sinead O’Connor’s NOTHING COMPARES 2 U. Originally recorded by Prince’s group Family but no-one much remembers that now. Here’s the official clip showing her at the pinnacle of her career. Beautiful.

Now before the messages start filling my inbox, I’m sure that I’ve missed some obvious great covers and two hours is not nearly enough time to give credit where credit is due. Let’s go on the record as saying that, yes, every cover of a Leonard Cohen number is probably better than the original (sorry Leonard) but if I hear HALLELUJA one more time I will scream; that Cat Power is very good, but not a genius and that no-one can do Roy Orbison like Roy Orbison, not even kd lang.

And so I chose to go out with the Clash’s cover of  I FOUGHT THE LAW AND THE LAW WON, originally recorded by The Bobby Fuller Four and royorbisonbeatlesthen it was something quite special: ARE YOU LONESOME TONIGHT? was first published in 1926 and was most notably covered by Elvis Presley in 1960. I have no idea when this version was recorded, most probably when the Beatles toured the US in the mid 60’s. It’s Elvis with Roy Orbison and the Beatles doing back-up. I’ve only been able to find it as a download but if anyone has any back story on this, let me know. And the finale was The Beatles covering TWIST & SHOUT, originally recorded by the Top Notes but most people may be more aware of the Isley Brothers version. The Beatles definitely made this one their own.

Here’s the complete playlist, with original artists in brackets:

My Favourite Things (From The Sound Of Music) 4:38 John Coltrane Broadway Originals Jazz 4
Eleanor Rigby (The Beatles) 3:00 Ray Charles Jazz 9
Hurt (Nine Inch Nails) 3:39 Johnny Cash American IV: The Man Comes Around Country 8
All Along The Watchtower (Bob Dylan) 4:00 Jimi Hendrix The Ultimate Experience Classic Rock 4
Sweet Jane (Lou Reed) 3:35 Cowboy Junkies Alternative 8
We Can Work It Out (Beatles) 3:18 Stevie Wonder Greatest Hits, Vol. 2 R&B 6
Proud Mary (Creedence Clearwater Revival) 4:57 Ike & Tina Turner R&B 10
Ruby Tuesday (Rolling Stones) 4:37 Melanie Safka Folk/Pop 3
Real Love (John Lennon) 3:15 Regina Spektor Instant Karma: The Amnesty International Campaign to save Darfur Alternative 5
Seven Nation Army (White Stripes) 3:15 C.W. Stoneking Like A Version Four Alternative
Tobacco Road (Nashville Teens) 4:06 Edgar & Johnny Winter Entrance Blues/Rock
Me And Bobby McGee (Roger Miller) 4:33 Janis Joplin Country/Blues 3
The Beat Goes On (Sonny & Cher) 5:28 Patricia Barber Companion Jazz 4
After Midnight (JJ Cale) 2:54 Eric Clapton The Cream Of Clapton Blues 5
Voodoo Child (Jimi Hendrix) 7:58 Stevie Ray Vaughan Chicago Blues Fest 1985 Blues 6
How Can You Mend A Broken Heart? (Bee Gees) 6:19 Al Green Love & Happiness: The Very Best Of Al Green [Disc 2] R&B 1
Respect (orig. Otis Redding) 2:29 Aretha Franklin (Otis Redding cover 65) Forrest Gump – The Soundtrack R&B 5
Just My Imagination (The Temptations) 4:38 The Rolling Stones Some Girls Classic Rock 3
Gloria (Van Morrison/Them) 5:56 Patti Smith Horses Alternative 5
By The Time I Get To Phoenix (Johnny Rivers/Glen Campbell) 7:06 Isaac Hayes Soul Hits of the 70s Soul 2
Light My Fire (The Doors) 2:51 Jackie Wilson Super Breaks Rhythmic Soul 2
Nothing Compares 2 U (The Family/Prince) 5:07 Sinead O’Connor She Who Dwells [UK] Disc 2 Rock/Pop 5
I Fought The Law (Bobby Fuller Four) 2:41 The Clash London Calling Punk 5
Are You Lonesome Tonight 2:49 Elvis Presley & Roy Orbison (with the Beatles as the backup singers) Rock Ballad 5
Twist And Shout (Top Notes/Isley Bros) 2:33 The Beatles Please Please Me Rock

My Favourite Things (Julie Andrews/ The Sound Of Music) – John Coltrane

Eleanor Rigby (The Beatles) – Ray Charles

Hurt (Nine Inch Nails) – Johnny Cash

All Along The Watchtower (Bob Dylan) – Jimi Hendrix

Sweet Jane (Lou Reed/Velvet Underground) – Cowboy Junkies

We Can Work It Out (Beatles) – Stevie Wonder

Proud Mary (Creedence Clearwater Revival) – Ike & Tina Turner

Ruby Tuesday (Rolling Stones) – Melanie Safka

Real Love (John Lennon)  – Regina Spektor

Seven Nation Army (White Stripes) – C.W. Stoneking

Tobacco Road (Nashville Teens) – Edgar & Johnny Winter

Me And Bobby McGee (Roger Miller) – Janis Joplin

The Beat Goes On (Sonny & Cher) – Patricia Barber

After Midnight (JJ Cale) – Eric Clapton

Voodoo Child (Jimi Hendrix) – Stevie Ray Vaughan

How Can You Mend A Broken Heart? (Bee Gees) – Al Green

Respect (Otis Redding) – Aretha Franklin 

Just My Imagination (The Temptations) – The Rolling Stones

Gloria (Van Morrison/Them) – Patti Smith

By The Time I Get To Phoenix (Johnny Rivers/Glen Campbell) – Isaac Hayes

Light My Fire (The Doors) – Jackie Wilson

Nothing Compares 2 U (The Family/Prince) – Sinead O’Connor

I Fought The Law (Bobby Fuller Four) – The Clash

Are You Lonesome Tonight – Elvis Presley & Roy Orbison (with the Beatles as the backup singers)

Twist And Shout (Top Notes/Isley Bros) – The Beatles

Next week we’re going to Burn, Baby, Burn as all our songs will be about FIRE.
Listen to Lyn McCarthy at the Theme Park on BayFM, Tuesdays 2-4pm, Sydney time.    

Also streaming on http://www.bayfm.org

Tragically also on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/maccalyn

 

FATHERS

imagesWith Fathers Day coming up on Sunday, our theme this week was a lay down misere: dads, grandads, step-dads, good dads, bad dads… even sugar daddies got a look in on our show dedicated to FATHERS. 

We opened with a song about one of the worst father’s in pop-music. The Temptations PAPA WAS A ROLLING STONE talks of a Dad who was a dishonest, cheating, alcoholic. But hey, not everyone’s perfect! With a huge variety of music in the playlist,  I’m sure we addressed the balance.

 A song that puts a lump in my throat is Billy Bragg’s TANK PARK SALUTE. There are several songs about grieving for a father who has died, but none seems as powerful as this track. It was written as a way of addressing the silence and denial that surrounded his dad’s illness. Take a look at this 1991 performance:

images-1My Dad died many years ago now and if you’ve been through it you’ll know that the event creates one of life’s turning points. Equally, becoming a parent is also a life-changing event. Most new dads only get to bore their friends, but the proud rock-star dad can annoy the whole world if he chooses. One of the few truly likable songs about fatherhood is David Bowie’s cheerful, self-effacing KOOKS – although advising “Don’t pick fights with the bullies or the cads” is a bit much from someone who christened his poor son Zowie. Another newborn inspired Radiohead’s end-of-the-world lullaby SAIL TO THE MOON. 

ccr4Creedence Clearwater Revival have a different take on paternity and destiny in FORTUNATE SON: a cry of blue-collar resentment, directed at the privileged elite who used their connections to protect their sons from being sent to Vietnam.

 Neil Young gave us OLD MAN with a little bit of help from James Taylor and Linda Ronstadt; Eric Clapton sang of a father he never knew with IN MY FATHERS EYES. And then it was Elvis with the song that his daughter Lisa Marie sang at the 20th anniversary celebrations of his death: DON’T CRY DADDY. Check out this amateur video of the performance. It seems its the only version, unfortunately, as its also on the offical Elvis site.

Luther Vandross’ song, DANCE WITH MY FATHER, won the 2004 Grammy Award for song of the year. We followed that with Bobby ‘Blue’ Bland’s DUST GOT IN DADDY’S EYES and The Winstons’  song COLOR HIM FATHER that was dedicated to all the step-fathers out there. 

Not wanting to get too serious at the Theme Park, so it was well and truly time for James Brown and PAPA’S GOT A BRAND NEW BAG. Here’s a clip from the Ed Sullivan show, May 1966. I love the way Ed Sullivan is beaming at the end of the performance and exclaims “Wow, that was exciting wasn’t it!”. Yes, Ed it was. Long live the Godfather of Soul.

Time for some jazz: I didn’t want to overlook one of my favourite kinds of Dads and Julie London’s ode to the Sugar Daddy was perfect.  And then it was Big Bad Voodoo Daddy with GO DADDY-O. A very nice segue into Hawkeshaw Hawkins with RATTLESNAKIN DADDY and The Heartbreakers with ROCKIN’ DADDY O.   

And we didn’t want to forget the dear old, (or young as the case may be), Grandads: Fats Waller gave us GRAND OLD DAD. A change of pace saw the Dave Matthews Band rock out with DREAMS OF OUR FATHERS and then Everclear lamented an absent father in FATHER OF MINE. Here’s the very cool video clip:

A couple of songs for my children who lost their father when they were quite young: For Jack a song by his father’s favourite artist: John Lennon and BEAUTIFUL BOY. And for Zoe, it was another favourite – Paul Simon singing FATHER AND DAUGHTER. Here’s a live performance of that song from 2006.

When I played Eric Clapton’s very moving TEARS IN HEAVEN I guarantee there wasn’t a dry eye at the station. Clapton wrote the song after losing his son Connor in a terrible accident. And then it was a song that isn’t overtly about fatherhood but I interpret it that way, and you may too.  It’s Roy Orbison and the Mavericks doing a cover of Simon & Garfunkle’s BRIDGE OVER TROUBLED WATER

Ian Hunter grieves that his relationship with his Dad is just like Two Ships That Pass in the Night in his song SHIPS. Ian Dury followed with MY OLD MAN, a quirky, affectionate memento of his Dad, an East End bus driver. At Dury’s funeral in 2000, the song was performed by his own son, Baxter. Here he is with the Blockheads performing live.

Thanks to Ku Promotions for the tickets we gave away to the COOL NIGHTS BIG BAND performance. It encouraged me to go out with a jazz standard: SONG FOR MY FATHER by the Horace Silver Quintet. Released on the Blue Note label, the cover art features a photograph of Silver’s father. If you listen to the opening bass piano notes, you might just recognize what Steely Dan borrowed for their song RIKKI DON’T LOSE THAT NUMBER.

Happy Fathers Day to all you Dads for next Sunday. Here’s this week’s playlist:

Papa Was A Rollin’ Stone  – The Temptations 

Daddy’s Home – Shep & The Limelites

Tank Park Salute – Billy Bragg

My Father’s Waltz – Hem

Kooks – David Bowie

Sail To The Moon – Radiohead

Fortunate Son – Creedence Clearwater Revival

Old Man – Neil Young

My Father’s Eyes – Eric Clapton

Don’t Cry Daddy – Elvis Presley

Dance With My Father – Luther Vandross

Dust Got Into Daddy’s Eyes – Bobby ‘Blue’ Bland

Color Him Father  – The Winstons

Papa’s Got A Brand New Bag – James Brown

Daddy – Julie London

Go Daddy-O – Big Bad Voodoo Daddy

Rattlesnakin’ Daddy – Hawkshaw Hawkins

Rockin’ Daddy O – The Heartbreakers 

Grand Old Dad – Fats Waller

Dreams of Our Fathers – Dave Matthews Band

Father Of Mine  – Everclear

Daddy’s Song – Harry Nillson

Beautiful Boy – John Lennon

Father and Daughter – Paul Simon

Tears In Heaven  – Eric Clapton

Bridge Over Troubled Waters – Roy Orbison & the Mavericks

Ships (That Pass In The Night) – Ian Hunter

My Old Man – Ian Dury & The Blockheads

Song For My Father – Horace Silver

Next week: BIRDS (the feathered variety).

Listen to Lyn McCarthy at the Theme Park on BayFM, Tuesdays 2-4pm, Sydney time.

Also streaming on http://www.bayfm.org

Tragically also on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/maccalyn

and Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/themeparkradio

 

Papa Was A Rollin’ Stone 6:59 The Temptations 72 My Girl: The Very Best Of The Temptations [Disc 2] Motown 39
Stinger Happy Fathers Day 0:15 13
Daddy’s Home 2:59 Shep & The Limelites Daddy’s Home Doo Wop 28
Tank Park Salute 3:30 Billy Bragg Don’t Try This At Home Alternative 6
My Father’s Waltz 2:13 Hem Eveningland Folk 4
Kooks 2:49 David Bowie Hunky Dory Rock/Pop 9
Sail To The Moon 4:28 Radiohead Hail to the Thief Indie 5
Fortunate Son (1994) 2:21 Creedence Clearwater Revival Forrest Gump – The Soundtrack Rock 11
Old Man (1972) with James Taylor on banjo tuned like a guitar + Linda Ronstadt on vocals 3:25 Neil Young Harvest Folk Rock 45
My Father’s Eyes 5:24 Eric Clapton Pilgrim Blues 31
Don’t Cry Daddy 2:50 Elvis Presley Essential Rock 1
Dance With My Father 4:26 Luther Vandross Dance With My Father R&B/Soul 5
Dust Got Into Daddy’s Eyes 2:28 Bobby ‘Blue’ Bland R&B 9
Color Him Father 3:14 The Winstons Billboard Top 100 Of 1969 R&B 9
Papa’s Got A Brand New Bag 2:17 James Brown Live Funk 29
Daddy 2:19 Julie London Ultra-Lounge, Vol. 15: Wild, Cool & Swingin’ Too! Easy Listening 22
Go Daddy-O 3:11 Big Bad Voodoo Daddy Swingers Soundtrack Swing 6
Stinger Happy Fathers Day 0:15 13
Rattlesnakin’ Daddy 2:47 Hawkshaw Hawkins Rockabilly 6
Rockin’ Daddy O 2:38 The Heartbreakers 50’s The Great Rock n Roll Roots Rock Roots 6
Grand Old Dad (1941) 2:49 Fats Waller Rewind: The Very Best of Fats Waller Jazz 15
Dreams of Our Fathers 4:44 Dave Matthews Band Everyday Rock & Roll 5
Father Of Mine 3:51 Everclear So Much For The Afterglow Alternative 7
Daddy’s Song 2:09 Harry Nillson Pop 4
Beautiful Boy 4:04 John Lennon Rock Ballad 2
Father and Daughter 4:10 Paul Simon Rock 8
Tears In Heaven 4:32 Eric Clapton The Rolling Stone Magazines 500 Greatest Songs Of All Time R&B 1
Bridge Over Troubled Waters 6:27 Roy Orbison & the Mavericks Rock
Ships (That Pass In The Night) 4:11 Ian Hunter Rock Ballad 5
My Old Man 3:39 Ian Dury & The Blockheads Rock/Pop 1
Song For My Father 7:19 Horace Silver The Blue Box Blue Note’s Best (Disc 4) Jazz

AUTOMOBILES

Pimp-My-Ride-ps13I’m addicted to the TV show PIMP MY RIDE. I would love for those guys to get my beaten up old Subaru and turn it into a low ridin’ bitchin’ machine. But that’s never going to happen. Next best thing: use the Theme Park radio show to promote AUTOMOBILES. And what better way to start the program than with Kraftwerk’s AUTOBAHN. It’s a driving song that eliminates the human driver and instead presents a very cool interpretation of machines on the move.

Things heated up with The Beach Boys’ ode to teenage freedom –  FUN, FUN, FUN, and then it was time for the 1951 single often regarded as the first ever rock’n’roll record. Jackie Brenston’s ROCKET 88 celebrates the Oldsmobile 88. Metaphor lovers, however, will quickly cotton on that the real object of Jackie’s enthusiasm may not be a car.  

Green tractorLiving in a rural area, we couldn’t leave tractors out of the playlist, so here’s a song dedicated to all the farmers out there: Jason Aldean with BIG GREEN TRACTOR

imagesPrince’s first big hit, LITTLE RED CORVETTE, takes automotive innuendo as far as it will go. A little trivia for you: Stevie Nicks got the idea for her 1983 song STAND BACK  from LITTLE RED CORVETTE. She heard Prince’s song in her car, wrote STAND BACK that night, and called Prince, who came into the studio and played keyboards.

It was time for two of the great blues singers:  Junior Parker likes to think that, as far as his relationship is concerned, he’s the DRIVING WHEEL;  the wonderful Memphis Minnie isn’t sure that sitting in the passenger seat is for her, however, in ME AND MY CHAUFFEUR BLUES.

Tracy Chapman sees the car as a means of escape from a dead-end life. But her ambition isn’t matched by a boyfriend who turns out to be just like her hard-drinking Dad. Being the smart girl she is, her advice is for him to take his FAST CAR and keep on drivin’. 

I couldn’t leave out the ever reliable bus as a mode of transport and the Hollies filled the slot nicely with their 1966 hit, BUS STOP. And another 60’s gem we had to play was the Beatles with BABY YOU CAN DRIVE MY CAR.  

Time then for the bearded ones: ZZ Top reckon that SHE LOVES MY AUTOMOBILE. Well, of course. Two more excellent songs followed. Firstly, The Modern Lovers track ROADRUNNER, a song that has been good to Theme Park as imagesit was also used on the show dedicated to RADIO. And then it was the Primus track JERRY WAS A RACE CAR DRIVER.  A show on automobiles, however, would not be complete without Chuck Berry who sang one of the great auto songs: MAYBELLENE. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame included three of Chuck Berry’s songs (Johnny B Goode, Maybellene and Rock and Roll Music), in the list of 500 songs that shaped Rock and Roll.

The lovely Quentin, who hosts Q’s Jazz & Blues on BayFM, called in with a request: MOTORVATIN’ MAMA from The Rhythm Kings. Some very sexy symbolism running riot there Q!  I paired it with Mic Conway’s National Junk Band singing WHO GAVE YOU A LICENCE TO DRIVE ME CRAZY?  A great cabaret act and it was terrific to see them at this year’s Blues Festival.

A change of pace when Chris Spedding and the Vibrations praised the art of MOTOR BIKIN’ and The Clash bragged about a BRAND NEW CADILLAC.  Check out The Clash performing live at the US Festival in ’83.

A re-discovery for me was Yello. A Swiss group that has been recording since the 80’s, they have escaped my attention of late. But their song THE RACE was absolutely perfect for the show and had to be included. Check out this mad clip:

In CAR WHEELS ON A GRAVEL ROAD, the five-year-old Lucinda Williams is a reluctant passenger who watches “telephone poles, trees and wires fly by”, from the back seat, while her parents make plans in front. This song served as a quite beautiful 200px-Born_to-be_wild-steppenwolf-45breather because it was soon time to fasten our seatbelts in preparation for some serious rock ‘n’ roll: Deep Purple with HIGHWAY STAR,  Steppenwolf with BORN TO BE WILD and Jimi Hendrix with CROSSTOWN TRAFFIC. This triple play had all the BayFM volunteers and office staff up and dancing in the green room! Who knew work could be so much fun?

I was happy to include a couple of listener requests: RADAR LOVE from Golden Earring and Gary Numan’s most enduring hit, CARS. According to Numan, the song’s lyrics were inspired by an incident of road rage: “I was in traffic in London once and had a problem with some people in front. They tried to beat me up and get me out of the car. I locked the doors and eventually drove up on the pavement and got away from them. It’s kind of to do with that. It explains how you can feel safe inside a car in the modern world… When you’re in it, your whole mentality is different… It’s like your own little personal empire with four wheels on it”. Still going strong, here’s Gary back in the day:

A little plug before I go: BayFM is a volunteer based, community radio station dedicated to bringing our listeners intelligent, informative and entertaining programming. We are totally reliant on subscriptions to keep the station on air. So, if you want to support independent radio you can go to http://www.bayfm.org and subscribe online. We would really appreciate it. And if you ask to be acknowledged on the Theme Park show I promise to give you a big shout-out. But, best of all, you go into the draw for all kinds of prizes. The top one this year is an all expenses trip to the Glastonbury Festival. That’s airfares, camping fees, entry fees, spending money! 

Roy Orbison was back with a vengeance and he closed the show with I DROVE ALL NIGHT. The patron saint of Theme Park Radio showed why he is one of my favourite singers. 

Here’s this week playlist:

Autobahn – Kraftwerk

Fun Fun Fun – The Beach Boys

Rocket 88  – Jackie Brenston

Big Green Tractor – Jason Aldean

Little Red Corvette – Prince

Me And My Chauffeur Blues – Memphis Minnie

Drivin’ Wheel – Junior Parker

Fast Car – Tracy Chapman

Bus Stop – The Hollies

Baby You Can Drive My Car – Beatles

She Loves My Automobile – ZZ Top

Jerry Was a Race Car Driver – Primus

Roadrunner – The Modern Lovers

Maybelline – Chuck Berry

Motorvatin Mama – Rhythm Kings

Who Gave You A Licence To Drive Me Crazy?  – Mic Conway’s National Junk Band

Motor Bikin’ – Chris Spedding & The Vibrations

Brand New Cadillac  – The Clash

The Race – Yello

Low Rider – War

Car Wheels On A Gravel Road – Lucinda Williams

Highway Star – Deep Purple

Born to Be Wild – Steppenwolf

Crosstown Traffic – Jimi Hendrix

Radar Love – Golden Earring

Cars – Gary Numan

I Drove All Night – Roy Orbison

Next week: Celebrating Fathers Day here in Australia on September 6, so FATHERS it is. Any requests?

Listen to Lyn McCarthy at the Theme Park on BayFM, Tuesdays 2-4pm, Sydney time.

Also streaming on http://www.bayfm.org

Tragically also on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/maccalyn

and Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/themeparkradio

 

 

Autobahn 5:02 Kraftwerk electro 3
Fun Fun Fun 2:02 Pet Sounds Pet Sounds Pop
Rocket 88 2:50 Jackie Brenston Martin Scorsese Presents The Blues – A Musical Journey (Disc 3) Blues 2
Big Green Tractor 3:24 Jason Aldean Wide Open Country 3
Little Red Corvette 4:57 Prince Funk 5
Me And My Chauffeur Blues 2:47 Memphis Minnie Martin Scorsese Presents The Blues – A Musical Journey (Disc 2) Blues 7
Drivin’ Wheel 2:38 Junior Parker Martin Scorsese Presents The Blues – A Musical Journey (Disc 4) Blues 1
Fast Car 4:57 Tracy Chapman Tracy Chapman Folk Blues 2
Bus Stop 2:54 The Hollies Complete Sixties “65/”67 (Disc 4) Pop 3
Baby You Can Drive My Car 2:27 Beatles Rock
She Loves My Automobile 2:23 ZZ Top Blues 1
Jerry Was a Race Car Driver 3:11 Primus Sailing the Seas of Cheese Alternative 5
Roadrunner 4:06 The Modern Lovers Theme Time Radio Hour with Your Host Bob Dylan (Disc 2) Punk 8
Maybelline 2:19 Chuck Berry Rock Roots 6
Motorvatin Mama 3:37 Rhythm Kings Jazz
Who Gave You A Licence To Drive Me Crazy? 3:46 Mic Conway’s National Junk Band Corporate Chook Cabaret 2
Motor Bikin’ 2:38 Chris Spedding Best Of The Seventies 2/6 Rock 4
Brand New Cadillac 2:10 The Clash London Calling Punk Rock 2
The Race 3:20 Yello Essential Electronic 4
Low Rider 3:13 War Why Can’t We Be Friends Classic Rock 3
Car Wheels On A Gravel Road 4:45 Lucinda Williams Car Wheels On A Gravel Road Country 3
Highway Star 6:08 Deep Purple Rock 2
Born to Be Wild (1969) 3:29 Steppenwolf Easy Rider (1969) Rock 6
Crosstown Traffic 2:14 Jimi Hendrix The Ultimate Experience Classic Rock 1
Radar Love 6:22 Golden Earring Bacobens Rock Top 500 Rock 1
Cars 3:59 Gary Numan VH1: The Big 80’s Rock 2
I Drove All Night 3:45 Roy Orbison The Essential Roy Orbison (Disc 2)

OH, WE ALL LOVE TO BE BESIDE THE SEASIDE

ocean_surfaceIf they can have Xmas in July then I reckon I can do a show about the sea in winter. And I did. It was never going to be the kind of breezy show I would do if it was summer,  because, for me anyway, at this time of the year the ocean appears even more immense and overwhelming. Many of the songs in this week’s playlist reflected that.

Our magnificent opening track by the O’Jays, SHIP AHOY, was a perfect example. It’s introduced by the creak of timbers and the crack of slave-owners whips and is an angry tour de force that presents the ocean as a partner in crime.

bencombi-largeAnd while there were other serious songs in the  line-up, there were plenty of  frivolous and joyful tunes as well. And nothing could be more joyful than the sound of the ukulele: It was fantastic to have some live music in the show today as Ben, Renee and Azo from the group Blue Hulas took over the studio for a segment. They are the Northern Rivers original, (and, as far as I know, only), Hawaiian style band and their cruisy, island style music – complete with ukulele – was just right for this week’s theme.

flocks8The Beach Boys recorded a version of UNDER THE BOARDWALK, but it was the Drifters original version that I chose to play this week and gave some time to the Beach Boys for SAIL ON SAILOR, which is quite a serious song that uses the sea as a metaphor for life. Another serious song about the ocean is reggae star  Fred Locks’  BLACK STAR LINER. The title refers to the shipping line that was used to transport black Americans to Africa as part of the Back-to-Africa movement of the 19th century.

Some light relief came from Bobby Darin’s  hit from 1959, BEYOND THE SEA. I tried unsuccessfully to get a copy of the original version for the show: LA MER by French singer Charles Trenet. I’ll track this down, hopefully, and play in a future show.

A big welcome back to Roy Orbison with one of his best, LEAH. Check out this clip from the DVD Black & White Night where Roy is supported by Jackson Browne, T Bone Burnett, Elvis Costello, k.d.Lang, Bonnie Raitt, J.D. Souther, Bruce Springsteen, Tom Waits and Jennifer Warnes. Nice group of friends!

SEVEN SEAS OF RHYE from Queen was worth including just for its ending: ‘We all like to be beside the Seaside’. Other personal favourites that I played included LIGHTHOUSE from The Waifs and FROM THE SEA by Eskimo Joe. Talking of favourites: I had to include the Marvelettes with TOO MANY FISH IN THE SEA and the gorgeous Blossom Dearie singing her version of BETWEEN THE DEVIL AND THE DEEP BLUE SEA

How’s this for a diverse three in a row: An evocative piece of bubblegum from Aqua with WE BELONG TO THE SEA, a little reggae with ON THE BEACH IN HAWAI’I from Ziggy Marley and Led Zeppelin’s DOWN BY THE SEASIDE from their 1975 album Physical Graffiti. Whew. Here’s the beautiful lead singer of Aqua, Lene Nystrom Rasted, in the weird but wonderful video clip for WE BELONG TO THE SEA:

A request from Vanessa followed: Johnny Cash with SEA OF HEARTBREAK and I chose to follow that with Jenny Lewis singing BLACK SAND. For a little change of pace we played The Presets with GIRL AND THE SEA followed by Panic At The Disco’s BEHIND THE SEA. And then it was time for I’M THE OCEAN from the album Mirror Ball by Neil Young and featuring Pearl Jam.

ramones_-_ramones_a-ramonesJason Mraz’s live rendition of  WALK ON THE OCEAN was followed by the one and only Billy Holiday asking us HOW DEEP IS THE OCEAN? And then the Ramones contributed ROCKAWAY BEACH. I can’t quite get my head around the Ramones singing about the beach, but what the hell do I know – it was the highest charting single of their career. Go figure.

We finished the show with Getaway Plan’s WHERE THE CITY MEETS THE SEA and the wonderful Cat Power with SEA OF LOVE.  

Next week, I’m celebrating the SPLENDOUR IN THE GRASS Music Festival being held here in Byron Bay. The show’s theme will be GRASS – no, not THAT grass – well maybe there will be some songs about THAT grass. And if I can’t find enough songs about grass I’ll move onto trees and flowers. I’d love to hear from you with your suggestions. 

Here’s this week’s playlist on the SEA:

Ship Ahoy (2008 Single Version) 4:12 The O’jays The Essential O’Jays R&B/Soul 1
Peaceful Ocean Surf (with seagulls) 2:51 SLEEPYTIME FX 3
Under The Boardwalk 2:44 The Drifters The Legacy Continues R&B 4
Sail on Sailor 3:17 The Beach Boys The Departed Soundtrack Pop 1
Beyond The Sea 2:56 Bobby Darin That’s All Easy Listening 1
Black Star Liner 3:55 Fred Locks Reggae 3
Leah 2:41 Roy Orbison The Essential Roy Orbison (Disc 1) Country/Rock Ballad 21
A Salty Dog 4:36 Procol Harum A Salty Dog Rock 1
A Drop In The Ocean 1:58 Moloko Things To Make And Do Electronic 1
Seven seas of rhye 2:47 Queen Queen II Rock 7
Lighthouse 3:18 The Waifs Triple J Hottest 100, Vol. 11 [Disc 1] Alternative & Punk 2
From the Sea 3:19 Eskimo Joe Triple J’s Hottest 100 Volume 12 [Disc 1] Alternative   9
Too Many Fish In The Sea 2:29 The Marvelettes The Big Chill R&B 8
Between The Devil And The Deep Blue Sea 2:29 Blossom Dearie 15 Jazz 5
We Belong to the Sea 4:17 Aqua Aquarius Pop 7
On the Beach In Hawai’i 3:44 Ziggy Marley Love Is My Religion Reggae 6
Down By The Seaside 5:16 Led Zeppelin Classic Rock 4
Sea Of Heartbreak 2:43 Johnny Cash Country 6
Black Sand 2:54 Jenny Lewis Acid Tongue Alternative 4
Girl And The Sea 4:18 The Presets Girl And The Sea Electronica/Dance 3
Behind The Sea 3:16 Panic At The Disco Pretty Odd Alternative 1
I’m the Ocean 7:06 Neil Young/Pearl Jam Mirror Ball Rock 3
Walk on the Ocean 3:45 Jason Mraz Pop
How Deep Is The Ocean 2:59 Billie Holiday Diva Classics *** Icons *** Jazz/Blues 1
Rockaway Beach 2:05 The Ramones Punk 3
Oceans Away 4:00 The Fray Reason Rock/Pop
Where The City Meets The Sea 3:36 The Getaway Plan Other Voices, Other Rooms Pop
Sea Of Love (2008) [Remastered Version] 2:19 Cat Power Juno Alternative 2

Ship Ahoy (2008 Single Version) – The O’Jays

Under The Boardwalk  – The Drifters

Sail on Sailor – The Beach Boys

Beyond The Sea – Bobby Darin

Black Star Liner – Fred Locks

Leah – Roy Orbison

A Salty Dog – Procol Harum

A Drop In The Ocean – Moloko

Seven Seas Of Rhye – Queen

Lighthouse – The Waifs

From the Sea – Eskimo Joe

Too Many Fish In The Sea – The Marvelettes

Between The Devil And The Deep Blue Sea – Blossom Dearie

We Belong to the Sea – Aqua

On the Beach In Hawai’i  – Ziggy Marley

Down By The Seaside – Led Zeppelin 

Sea Of Heartbreak – Johnny Cash

Black Sand – Jenny Lewis

Girl And The Sea – The Presets

Behind The Sea – Panic At The Disco

I’m the Ocean – Neil Young/Pearl Jam

Walk on the Ocean  – Jason Mraz

How Deep Is The Ocean – Billie Holiday

Rockaway Beach – The Ramones

Oceans Away – The Fray

Where The City Meets The Sea – The Getaway Plan

Sea Of Love  [Remastered Version] – Cat Power

Next week: GRASS (+ trees, flowers).

Listen to Lyn McCarthy on BayFM99.9 Tuesdays 2-4pm (Sydney time).

Also streaming on http://www.bayfm.org.

Tragically, also on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/maccalyn

And Twitter: http://twitter.com/themeparkradio

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