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SONGS ABOUT SECRET VICES

Vice, like beauty, is in the eye of the beholder. Sex isn’t a vice, but bonking your best friend’s partner might be. Drinking isn’t a vice, but drinking from bottles that you’ve hidden in the back of the wardrobe possibly is. So, for the purpose of this week’s playlist,  its only a vice if a certain amount of secrecy or shame is attached to it.

So what do you think Doris Day was really singing about in our opening song, SECRET LOVE? Recorded in the ultra-conservative mid 1950’s, and knowing what we think we now do about Doris, could it possibly be  about the love that dare not speak its name? When she declares “My secret isn’t secret any more” she suddenly appears way more interesting than her wholesome image would have us believe.

Mary Gauthier confesses to taking after her alcoholic Dad on I DRINK. And while we’re on the subject of Daddys, Ray Davies call to ‘Come to Daddy’ has a very creepy subtext on the otherwise quite beautiful ART LOVER.

Prince’s SISTER is a 30-year old song about incest that still has the ability to shock. Another unnerving confessional was supplied by Anthony Hegarty, of Anthony & The Johnsons. He sings about his violent lover with incredible sweetness on FISTFUL OF LOVE.  The sting of a secret vice is unmistakable in lines such as, “I feel your fists, and I know it’s out of love.”

I’M LIVING IN SHAME sings Diana Ross and the Supremes, while Marvin Gaye’s admits that there’s something extra-curricular going on between him AND MRS JONES.

Nina Simone has some advice about FORBIDDEN FRUIT: “Go on and taste it, you don’t want to waste it”. The Kinks know exactly what she’s talking about on their huge hit about transgender love, LOLA.

The Go-Betweens’ song STREETS OF YOUR TOWN is a beautiful tale of small-town romance undercut with the revelation that even this seemingly perfect place is actually “a town full of battered wives”.

The Prodigy  admit to a little pyromania on FIRESTARTER:

And the Strangers submitted their quintessential song about perving at the beach – PEACHES:

We finished the show with a couple of very non-offensive pop songs. Kate Ceberano admits YOUNG BOYS ARE MY WEAKNESS. Is that a bad thing? Surely not.  Jill Sobule also owns up: She’s KISSED A GIRL, and she just may do it again. Shock horror! Released in 1995, way before whats her name’s version.


Next week I’m going to dedicate the show to SONGS ABOUT CRITTERS and I’m looking for songs about unusual animals, not just your cats and dogs. Film director Mark Lewis has sent me a recording of Tim Finn singing ‘Cane Toad Blues’ so that gives you an idea of the kind of thing I’m after.

And just a reminder that BayFM is hosting the premiere of Cane Toads: The Conquest in 3D on Wednesday June 1, 7pm at the Dendy Cinema in Byron Bay. It’s a benefit for BayFM with a party after at The Owl & Pussy Cat included in the price. If you’re a BayFM Subscriber that’s only $20. Get to the cinema now to pick up your tickets!

Here’s the complete playlist:

Secret Love - Doris Day, Ray Heindorf And His Orchestra
I Drink	- Mary Gauthier
Art Lover - The Kinks
Sister - Prince
Fistful of Love	- Antony & The Johnsons
I'm Living In Shame - Diana Ross & The Supremes
Me and Mrs. Jones - Marvin Gaye
Lola - The Kinks
Forbidden Fruit - Nina Simone
Streets Of Your Town - The Go-Betweens
Firestarter - The Prodigy
Peaches - The Stranglers
I Kissed A Girl - Jill Sobule
Young Boys Are My Weakness (Brave Album Version) - Kate Ceberano

Next week:  SONGS ABOUT CRITTERS

Listen to Lyn McCarthy at the Theme Park on BayFM at the new time of Mondays 1–2pm, Sydney time
Also streaming via BayFM
Tragically also on Facebook and Twitter
Email me at: lyn.themeparkradio@gmail.com

SMOKING

I’m not a smoker and, in fact, I think its a pretty silly way to spend your time, but I have to admit that there are some terrific songs on the subject, both for and against. We started the program with Tex Williams and His Western Caravan with SMOKE! SMOKE! SMOKE! THAT CIGARETTE, a western swing novelty song recorded in 1947. While the line “Ive smoked all my life and I ain’t dead yet” suggests that the song is pro-smoking, the chorus includes lines like “Puff, puff, puff … smoke yourself to death”. So Tex is having a two way bet, let’s just say.

Here Tex’s song is used brilliantly to illustrate all the smoking on my favourite TV series, Mad Men. This video will have one of two results: The repetitious, perfunctory and seemingly pointless act of inhaling smoke may turn you completeley off smoking cigarettes. Or, the fact that this repetitious, perfunctory, and seemingly pointless act is carried out by such debonair, dashing human beings will make you run to your corner store and chimney down a carton before dinner. Either way, advertising works.

We couldn’t leave out references to tobacco’s more pungent partner in crime, marijuana. Before this recreational drug was criminalised in the US, there was a fertile genre known as reefer jazz, of which Ella Fitzgerald’s WHEN I GET LOW I GET HIGH is a lively example.

When it comes to Bluegrass, Jimmy Martin was known as The King. He recorded a great smoking song called  I CAN’T QUIT CIGARETTES in 1966.

More currently, Hefner’s Darren Hayman gave us THE HYMN FOR THE CIGARETTES from the 1999 album The Fidelity Wars. Here the song is set against some of my favourite films including Contempt, Bad Education, Manhatten, Breathless, Coffee & Cigarettes, All About My Mother, A Bande A Part and more…


Talking Heads do a great version of TAKE ME TO THE RIVER “take my money, take my cigarettes I haven’t seen the worst of it yet…”  and, of course, there’s Otis Redding, mixing caffeine with his nicotine on CIGARETTES AND COFFEE.

Neil Young’s ROLL ANOTHER NUMBER (FOR THE ROAD) is from his most uneven album ‘Tonight’s the Night’ on which he looks back at Woodstock through a fog of smoke, which probably explains a thing or two about the quality of the album.

Rufus Wainwright contributed his charismatic 2001 showtune, CIGARETTES AND CHOCOLATE MILK. Everything he likes is just a little bit harmful for him (know the feeling!).

Jazz legend Nina Simone has some good advice: DON’T SMOKE IN BED. She recorded her version of Willard Robison’s piece  in 1958. And in 1959 a completely different style of music was being recorded by Joe and Rose Lee Maphis. Their honky tonk style of country music was also a crowd pleaser, with its old fashioned views about the role of women in society. Well it was 1959 folks. The song is DIM LIGHTS, THICK SMOKE (AND LOUD, LOUD, MUSIC).

David Bowie’s ROCK & ROLL SUICIDE is an avant garde showtune of sorts, where he references the Spanish poet Manuel Machado with the line “Time takes a cigarette…”

My pick from the multitude of reggae songs that celebrate weed is U Roy’s CHALICE IN THE PALACE because it has to be the most unusual of the bunch. Inspired by a dream, he outlines his plan to bond with the Queen over a hashpipe. Cool.

Ry Cooder proved, once again, that he must be the best slide guitarist in the world with a very nice live performance of FOOL FOR A CIGARETTE.

Canadian Hawksley Workman works a nice piece of sexual metaphor on JEALOUS OF YOUR CIGARETTE.


I had to include the Happy Mondays song LOOSE FIT, if only because it starts with someone lighting up and inhaling. Then it was a cruisy little number from Camper Van Beethoven who suggest we get high while the radio’s on. The song, GOOD GUYS & BAD GUYS, is a great example of the slacker ethos of the late 80’s.

Steve Miller reckons he’s a joker, a smoker and a midnight toker on The Steve Miller Band’s song JOKER. Brownsville Station’s SMOKIN’ IN THE BOYS ROOM took me back a few years. Remember when being a rebel was sharing a pack of Peter Stuyvesant’s behind the toilet block? Seems so distant now doesn’t it?

I love to play a little Pink Floyd now and again and HAVE A CIGAR from the album Wish You Were Here was perfect for this week’s show.

The Editors recorded a song about one of my big bugbears, SMOKERS OUTSIDE THE HOSPITAL DOORS. It drives me crazy when I go to visit someone in hospital and I see hospital workers and visitors congregating outside the hospital entrance smoking their lives away. Grrrr.

Super Furry Animals gave us a rambling, rousing slice of smoking philosophy on SMOKIN’, which we followed with REEFER MAN from Baron Lee and The Mill Blue Rhythm Band.

For all you Francophiles out there: Serge Gainsbourg and Catherine Deneuve want you to know that they’re big cigar fans. They even contend that God smokes them. I’m no theology expert, but who knows, they may be right! The song is DIEU EST UN FUMEUR DE HAVANES.

A couple of country songs on the subject of smoking: Lefty Frizzell with CIGARETTES AND COFFEE BLUES and a classic: Patsy Cline with THREE CIGARETTES IN AN ASHTRAY.

k.d. lang is a huge Patsy Cline fan and she’s covered many of her songs including THREE CIGARETTES IN AN ASHTRAY. And you’ve got to hand it to her for doing a whole album on smoking. So k.d. saw us out with a terrific song from the album Drag: MY LAST CIGARETTE.

Next week our show falls on March 8th which is International Women’s Day, so its a given that I’ll be presenting a program that features all my favourite female artists. Get in touch if you would like to request a particular song or artist. I’d love to hear from you.

Meanwhile, here’s the complete playlist from this week:

Smoke! Smoke! Smoke! (That Cigarette) – Tex Williams and His Western Caravan, Theme Time Radio Hour Volume Three [Disc 2]

When I Get Low I Get High – Ella Fitzgerald The Early Years: Part 1 (1935-1938) [Disc 1]

I Can’t Quit Cigarettes – Jimmy Martin, Smoke That Cigarette: Pleasure To Burn

The Hymn For The Cigarettes – Hefner, The Best of Hefner

Take Me To The River – Talking Heads, The Best Of

Cigarettes And Coffee – Otis Redding, The Soul Album

Roll Another Number (For The Road) – Neil Young, Tonight’s The Night

Cigarettes And Chocolate Milk – Rufus Wainwright, Dreamworks Fall

Don’t Smoke In Bed – Nina Simone, Little Girl Blue

Dim Lights, Thick Smoke (And Loud, Loud Music) – Joe and Rose Lee Maphis, Smoke That Cigarette: Pleasure To Burn

Rock & Roll Suicide – David Bowie, The Rise And Fall Of Ziggy Stardust

Chalice In The Palace (1990 Digital Remaster) – U-Roy, Dread In A Babylon

Fool For A Cigarette / Feelin’ Good – Ry Cooder

Jealous Of Your Cigarette – Hawksley Workman, (Last Night We Were) The Delicious Wolves

Richard Diamond Advertisement – Richard Diamond, Smoke That Cigarette: Pleasure To Burn

Loose Fit – Happy Mondays, The Chillout Album, Vol. 2

Good Guys & Bad Guys – Camper Van Beethoven

The Joker – The Steve Miller Band, Groovin’ 70’s

Smokin’ In The Boy’s Room – Brownsville Station, Best Of Brownsville Station

Have A Cigar – Pink Floyd, Wish You Were Here

Smokers Outside The Hospital Doors – Editors, An End Has A Start

Smokin’ – Super Furry Animals, Outspaced

Reefer Man – Baron Lee and The Mill Blue Rhythm Band

Dieu fumeur de Havana – Serge Gainsbourg/Catherine Deneuve

Cigarettes And Coffee Blues – Lefty Frizzell

Three Cigarettes In An Ashtray – Patsy Cline, The Ultimate Collection

My Last Cigarette – k.d. lang, Drag

Next week:  AUSTRALIAN WOMEN SINGERS

Listen to Lyn McCarthy at the Theme Park on BayFM, Tuesdays 4-6pm, Sydney time
Also streaming via BayFM
Tragically also on Facebook and Twitter
Email me at: lyn.themeparkradio@gmail.com

RESOLUTIONS & FRESH STARTS

Now, you may think I’m a bit behind the eight ball, doing a show on RESOLUTIONS AND FRESH STARTS in mid January, but I have a policy of not even thinking about New Year Resolutions until after my birthday, which is around this time. I’m not prepared to give up my wicked ways until those celebrations are well out of the way. And, to be honest, that could take up to 6 months at least.

So, I’ll allow the playlist to do the job for me. The wonderful Nina Simone set the tone with FEELING GOOD. She’s full of optimism because it’s a new day, a new life and she’s feeling good. I wonder how long that lasted? Because, as we all know, new resolutions and fresh starts are often accompanied by regret and, unfortunately, they almost always carry the potential for failure. But, let’s at least try and maintain some hope.

The Allman Brothers Band have had their ups and downs, so on a song like CHANGE MY WAY OF LIVING they’re sounding mighty ambitious. But hey, let’s give them the benefit of the doubt.

It was great to have Blues/Roots duo The Fridays in the studio for a chat and some live music. They’re from Adelaide and presently in Byron performing and promoting their EP Woh Oh. Kimberly McKenzie and Kelly Breuer’s original material melds rock out riffs with beautiful harmonies. A couple of the songs had me laughing out loud.  As well as playing ROMANCE COMEDY from their EP we were able to have them perform two other numbers live and it was such a pleasure. If you get a chance to catch them perform, anywhere, don’t miss out on supporting some fantastic up and coming Australian talent.

Motown giants The Supremes and The Temptations got together to record a version of Dee Dee Warwick’s I’M GONNA MAKE YOU LOVE ME and it became a huge hit for them in 1969. We followed that with the very appropriate NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTIONS from two more soul greats, Otis Redding and Carla Thomas.

If only Thin Lizzy’s Phil Lynot had followed through on his resolution, he might still be with us. Instead,  I’VE GOT TO GIVE IT UP, is a sad memorial to this amazing talent who died at 36.

Something a little less serious:  Husker Du reckon they’re NEVER TALKING TO YOU AGAIN. Oh come on guys, never say never. Bob Dylan is equally resolute. He swears he’s never going to work on  MAGGIES FARM no more. Fair enough.

The Who are convinced that they WON’T GET FOOLED AGAIN. A good resolution if ever I heard one, but, like a lot of resolutions, not that easy to keep.

Mama Kin is very convincing on her resolution song I’M GONNA DO IT. As is Bobby Bland who says he AIN’T GONNA BE THE FIRST TO CRY.

John Legend gets a little bit of help from Snoop Dogg on I CAN CHANGE. On this video clip he carries the day on his own (and you get the bonus of Spottie as well). Its a live performance in London with a terrific band and back-up.

George Thorogood & The Destroyers contributed one of those songs full of  promises. You know the ones:  men make them in order to win the woman of their dreams. In this case George says I’LL CHANGE MY STYLE.

Bobbie Gentry, who’s obviously met a few ‘Georges’ in her time swears I’LL NEVER FALL IN LOVE AGAIN.

Nick Cave, apparently has all the right intentions, he just has trouble delivering on his resolutions because RIGHT NOW HE’S A ROAMING. Steve Winwood knows that if you’re really serious about wanting a fresh start you have to make it happen WHILE YOU SEE A CHANCE.

Somehow I don’t think Ian Dury and the Blockheads were serious at all when they sang I WANT TO BE STRAIGHT.

Princess Superstar’s QUITTING SMOKING SONG was edited a little, otherwise we wouldn’t have been able to play it on radio, and that would have been a pity, I reckon. Meanwhile, Black Kids are promising I’M NOT GOING TO TEACH YOUR BOYFRIEND HOW TO DANCE WITH YOU. Quite right too.

A fun couple of songs to exit on: Mary Martin and the cast of South Pacific with I’M GONNA WASH THAT MAN RIGHT OUT OF MY HAIR. And one of my favourites, the wonderfully eccentric and optimistic Jonathan Richman, who knows all about fresh starts on I’M JUST BEGINNING TO LIVE.

Thanks to The Fridays for coming in and entertaining us in the first hour of the program. Don’t forget they’re performing at the Rails Hotel in Byron Bay on Thursday January 20th so get along and support them.

Thanks also to Lina, Chilla, Shel, Allan, Andy and Victoria for letting us know what their New Year Resolutions were for this year.

Next week’s show will be ALL AUSTRALIAN. Lots of nostalgia and some new stuff as well.

Until then, here’s this week’s playlist:

Feeling Good / Nina Simone

Change My Way Of Living / The Allman Brothers Band

Romance Comedy / The Fridays

I’m Gonna Make You Love Me / The Supremes

New Year’s Resolution / Otis Redding and Carla Thomas

Got To Give It Up / Thin Lizzy

Never Talking To You Again / Hüsker Dü

Maggie’s Farm / Bob Dylan

Won’t Get Fooled Again / The Who

I’m Gonna Do It / Mama Kin

I Ain’t Gonna Be The First To Cry / Bobby “Blue” Bland

I Can Change ft. Snoop Dogg / John Legend

I’ll Never Fall In Love Again / Bobbie Gentry

I’ll Change My Style / George Thorogood and The Destroyers

Right Now I’m A-Roaming / Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds

I Want To Be Straight / Ian Dury and The Blockheads

While You See A Chance / Steve Winwood

One Way Or Another / Blondie

Quitting Smoking Song / Princess Superstar

I’m Not Gonna Teach Your Boyfriend How To Dance With You / Black Kids

I’m Gonna Wash That Man Right Out of My Hair / Mary Martin and The Girl’s Chorus of South Pacific

I’m Just Beginning To Live /Jonathan Richman and The Modern Lovers

Next week:  40 YEARS OF CLASSIC AUSTRALIAN ROCK

Listen to Lyn McCarthy at the Theme Park on BayFM, Tuesdays 4-6pm, Sydney time
Also streaming via BayFM
Tragically also on Facebook and Twitter
Email me at: lyn.themeparkradio@gmail.com


SONGS ABOUT DRINKING


This week’s theme was motivated entirely by a need NOT to do a show full of Xmas tunes. And while I know it was a risk choosing DRINKING as a theme, you’d be surprised how few songs there are that actually praise boozing. So expect a few remorseful anecdotes, a couple of hangover songs and a precautionary tale or two. But, for those of us who don’t mind a tipple, not to worry – I included a  few good old fashioned drinking songs as well. Hey, we couldn’t ignore Xmas altogether, could we?

We got the show rolling with the very upbeat WINE WINE WINE from the brilliant pioneers of electric blues and rock, Electric Flag featuring Mike Bloomfield on guitar and Buddy Miles on drums. Here they are in their heyday in 1967:

One of the great things about living in such a great area as Byron Bay is that we get all the best musical acts coming through here to perform. Recently Sharon Jones & The Dap Kings peformed at our local pub and consummate storyteller Mary Gauthier was here for the Mullumbimby Music Festival in November. Sharon contributed JUST DROPPED IN TO SEE WHAT CONDITION MY CONDITION WAS IN to the playlist and Mary gave us I DRINK, which has become a bit of a signature tune for her.

West Australian band Eskimo Joe’s album  BLACK FINGERNAILS, RED WINE was released in 2006 and the single of the same name went on to win single of the year at that year’s Aria Awards.Here’s why:

When it comes to the Blues, up there with the best is the late great Luther Allison. Love his rendition of CHERRY RED WINE and then it was the ‘King of Soul’, Otis Redding, with CHAMPAGNE & WINE.

Tom Waits was in total denial about his drinking habits back in the late 70’s. He’d have you know that THE PIANO HAS BEEN DRINKING (NOT ME). David Crosby, also had his moments will alcohol and other substances. He wrote EVERYBODY’S BEEN BURNED for The Byrds and its a very telling, and quite melancholic take on self-control and trust.

LCD Soundsystem’s This Is Happening is one of the best albums of 2010 (so there!) and  the video for DRUNK GIRLS is crazy. What’s with the Pandas – I have no clue!

I found Lonnie ‘The Cat’ on one of Bob Dylan’s Theme Time Hour compilations. His song I AIN’T DRUNK was recorded in 1954 with the Bobby Hines Band which included Ike Turner on piano. “I don’t care what the people are thinking. I ain’t drunk, I’m just drinking.” Brilliant.

Steve Earle’s signature tune is a story about a family who love their moonshine. Earle has been quoted as saying that COPPERHEAD ROAD is the world’s first blend of heavy metal and bluegrass. Not sure about that, but it’s certainly a great song.

ZZ Top’s contribution to this week’s show was BEER DRINKERS & HELL RAISERS. They’ll be making their way to the Byron Blues Fest in 2011, and I, for one, can’t wait. Here’s what we have in store for us:

We followed the absolutely crazy ALLIGATOR WINE from Screaming Jay Hawkins with a 1949 recording from  Betty Hall Jones, BUDDY, STAY OFF THE WINE. And then it was AIN’T GOT THE MONEY TO PAY FOR THE DRINK from George Zimmerman & The Thrills with the Bubber Cyphers Band (Whew). That was recorded in 1956.

I don’t think any song in the playlist was as serious as Gil Scott-Heron’s story about the effect of alcohol on family and community: THE BOTTLE.


We can’t stay very serious for long on the Theme Park, so a couple of light-hearted songs about drinking followed: Monty Python’s BRUCE’S PHILOSOPHERS SONG and The Rovers, recalling what sounds like a pretty good get together, on WASN’T THAT A PARTY.

Three more recent recordings, that just might make you think twice about partying too much over the holidays, had to make the list: THE GOOD TIMES ARE KILLING ME from Modest Mouse,  IT’S THE LITTLE THINGS WE DO from The Zutons and  MY ALCOHOLIC FRIENDS from the very lovely Amanda Palmer and Dresden Dolls.

Personally, I never developed a taste for whiskey. And maybe that’s a good thing, according to Skip James who doled out  a little advice about BAD WHISKEY. The Rakes then gave us, what they claim is a true story, with THE GUILT. And then it was drinking music from two of the greats: Nina Simone with a live version of GIN HOUSE BLUES and Billie Holiday with GIMME A PIGFOOT AND A BOTTLE OF BEER.

Before I knew it it was last call for our show on DRINKING and we finished on a very infectious note: Big Bad Voodoo Daddy  reckon YOU AND ME AND THE BOTTLE MAKES THREE. And then it was the sublime Peggy Lee who doesn’t need alcohol at all. She says I GET A KICK OUT OF YOU. Awwww.

Next week is the last show of the year, so I thought I would bring you songs from my favourite albums of 2010. So no nostalgia next week, all new music and a look back at the year that was.

The week after, January 4, I’ll be welcoming members of Orkestra del Sol into the studio. They have wowed audiences at Glastonbury & Edinburgh and will be coming to Byron directly from their performances at Woodford. So make sure you tune in then. Oh, and the theme will be Multilingual songs, by which I mean any song which features two or more languages in the lyrics. Come on, its not fun if its not challenging, right?

As promised on my Facebook page (what? you didn’t know about Theme Park Radio’s Facebook page???), here’s my tried and true recipe for a champagne cocktail: It goes particularly well with hot jazz and good times:

Place a sugar cube in the bottom of a champagne flute, Saturate the cube with two dashes of Angostura bitters (don’t leave this bit out – essential). Then add 1 oz of brandy and then gently pour some very chilled champagne into the flute. Yum.

Have a safe and happy Xmas.

Here’s the playlist:

James Bond movie clip – Shaken Not Stirred (movie clip)

Wine, Wine, Wine – The Electric Flag

Just Dropped In To See What Condition My Condition Was In – The Dynamic Funk and Soul Sound of Daptone Records, Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings

I Drink –  Mary Gauthier

Black Fingernails, Red Wine – Black Fingernails, Red Wine, Eskimo Joe

Cherry Red Wine – Martin Scorsese Presents: The Blues [Disc 5], Luther Allison

Champagne & Wine – The Immortal Otis Redding, Otis Redding

The Piano Has Been Drinking (Not Me) – Small Change, Tom Waits

Everybody’s Been Burned – The Byrds Box Set  (Disc 2 -Cruising Altitude), The Byrds

Drunk Girls – This Is Happening, LCD Soundsystem

I Ain’t Drunk – Lonnie ‘The Cat”

Copperhead Road – Essential Steve Earle, Steve Earle

Beer Drinkers & Hell Raisers – Tres Hombres, ZZ Top

Alligator Wine – Frenzy Screamin’ Jay Hawkins

Buddy, Stay Off The Wine – Betty Hall Jones

Ain’t Got The Money To Pay For The Drink – George Zimmerman & The Thrills

The Bottle – Winter In America, Gil Scott-Heron and Brian Jackson

Bruce’s Philosophers Song – Monty Python

Wasn’t That A Party – Cleveland International Records 1977-1983, The Rovers

The Good Times Are Killing Me – Good News For People Who Love Bad News, Modest Mouse

It’s The Little Things We Do – Tired Of Hanging Around, The Zutons

My Alcoholic Friends – Yes, Virginia…, The Dresden Dolls

Bad Whiskey – She Lyin’, Skip James

The Guilt – Capture/Release, The Rakes

Gin House Blues – Nina Simone: The Tomato Collection [Disc 2], Nina Simone

Gimme a Pigfoot and a Bottle of Beer – Sophisticated Ladies [Disc 3], Billie Holiday

You & Me & The Bottle Makes Three – Swingers, Big Bad Voodoo Daddy

I Get A Kick Out Of You – Sings For You, Peggy Lee

Next week:  MY FAVOURITE ALBUMS OF 2010

Listen to Lyn McCarthy at the Theme Park on BayFM, Tuesdays 4-6pm, Sydney time
Also streaming via BayFM
Tragically also on Facebook and Twitter
Email me at: lyn.themeparkradio@gmail.com

SONGS ABOUT THE SUN

We’re well and truly into Summer and where are all those beautiful sunny days that this season promises? As I write this, I’m looking out at torrential rain. So, it was definitely wishful thinking that propelled me into this week’s playlist on THE SUN.

We opened the show with a song that radiates optimism, the Beatles GOOD DAY SUNSHINE, written by Paul McCartney and released on the 1966 album Revolver. A relatively new track comes from Michael Franti. I dedicated THE SOUND OF SUNSHINE to the lovely Suzie M. and her grandchildren, Reem & Aliyah who are huge Michael Franti fans.

Local lad Christian Pyle did a great job at the recent Mullumbimby Music Festival and although I played RAY OF YOUR SUNSHINE during my interview with him a couple of weeks ago, it such a great number I had to play it again. It’s from his Nothing Left to Burn album.

The Cream’s SUNSHINE OF YOUR LOVE is an absolute classic and is still their best-selling song of all time. Here’s Eric Clapton, Ginger Baker and Jack Bruce playing live circa 1968.

Beth Orton does a brilliant cover of The Ronettes I WISH I NEVER SAW THE SUNSHINE. I found it on the soundtrack to the film Twentyfourseven (brilliant film btw), but its also on her 1996 debut album ‘Trailer Park’. Here she performs live and is accompanied by the very talented Ted Barnes.

The wonderful Katie Noonan possibly does the best cover ever of Soundgarden’s BLACK HOLE SUN that I have ever heard. I usually don’t like to play videos that are simply photo montages, but I can’t give up the opportunity of putting her voice out there. Sublime.

There was no way I was doing a show on THE SUN without playing Stevie Wonder’s YOU ARE THE SUNSHINE OF MY LIFE. Here he is giving a rare studio concert at London’s Teddington Studios following the release of his ‘Conversation Peace’ album. A sensual ride for an intimate audience of less than 200 fans. You get the bonus of SUPERSTITION on this clip too, which I have to admit is actually my favourite Stevie Wonder number.

Bobby Hebb’s SUNNY is another very optimistic song, considering that it was written in response to his brother’s violent death which occurred on the same day of JFK’s assassination.

Two great songs that were released in 1966 are Donovan’s SUNSHINE SUPERMAN and The Kinks’ SUNNY AFTERNOON. The Kink’s strong Music Hall  flavour and lyrical focus was part of a stylistic departure for the band, who had risen to fame in 1964-65 with a series of hard-driving, power-chord rock hits. Ironically, the promotional video for the single featured the band performing in a cold, snowy environment:

Nina Simone’s cover of George Harrison’s HERE COMES THE SUN is an almost religious experience. Starting slowly at first it builds to a flood of warmth and wonder. Unlike the weather here at the moment, unfortunately.

For Ros, and all the other reggae fans, we played Bob Marley’s SUN IS SHINING and followed with the Bill Withers standard – a perfectly apt song for Byron Bay at the moment: AIN’T NO SUNSHINE.

Let’s don’t get too despondent about the weather. As Elaine Page suggests “the sun will come out TOMORROW“. From the  musical Annie that song went out to BayFM’s Tommy T-Jet who hosts All Things Camp Friday’s at 1pm.

The Eagles song TEQUILA SUNRISE was written by Don Henley and Glenn Frey and is from the album Desperado. I’ve been meaning to do a show just on The Eagles and its certainly on the agenda.

A show on THE SUN wouldn’t be the same if it didn’t include the Beach Boys. I had lots of suggestions for various tunes but  I chose the very evocative THE WARMTH OF THE SUN. It was the B-side to Dance, Dance, Dance released in 1964.

Violent Femmes released their debut album  in 1982.  The music was an innovative combination of American folk music and punk rock, which would much later come to be known as “folk punk”.  The lyrics were the common themes of yearning for love, sex and affection. The group quickly gained a following that never veered into mainstream commercialism. One of the songs that gained recognition was A BLISTER IN THE SUN.

2010 is the 25th anniversary of the very infectious  WALKING ON SUNSHINE released by Katrina and the Waves. Can you believe it?

I don’t think the The Beloved were getting up with the birds to see the  SUN RISING. Somehow I imagine they were on their way home from a big night out.

Australian band The Waifs recorded their 2007 album SUN DIRT WATER in Nashville and it was released on Jarrah Records, a fully independent label they share with John Butler Trio and MGM Distribution.

A couple of oldies but goodies come in the shape of THE SUN AIN’T GONNA SHINE ANYMORE from The Walker Brothers and DON’T LET THE SUN CATCH YOU CRYING from Gerry & The Pacemakers.

A while back I put together a show of songs that ask questions. And here’s a couple more: The Velvet Underground want to know WHO LOVES THE SUN and They Might Be Giants ask WHY DOES THE SUN SHINE?

The Spazzys is an all girl punk band from Melbourne who are heavily influenced by the Ramones. They’ve even taken their band’s name as their surname – Kat Spazzy, Lucy Spazzy and Ally Spazzy. Cool. The song SUNSHINE DRIVE is on their Aloha! Go Bananas album released in 2004 but my copy came from the soundtrack of the very good Australian film Suburban Mayhem.

One of The Kinks best known and most acclaimed songs is WATERLOO SUNSET.  Ray Davies says, in a 2008 interview, that the song was a fantasy about his sister going off with her boyfriend and emigrating  to another country.

Little Village were a supergroup who only released one album. Band members included Ry Cooder, John Hiatt, Nick Lowe and Jim Keitner. Sung by John Hiatt, the track SOLAR SEX PANEL certainly suggests a good use for the sun’s rays!

We closed the show with Pink Floyds’s very trippy SET THE CONTROLS FOR THE HEART OF THE SUN.

Next week, I’m going to  celebrate the Xmas Party season with SONGS ABOUT DRINKING. I’m looking for everything from rowdy singalongs to barfly melancholia and guilty hangover confessionals. That should cover everything! It will be the day after the BayFM Xmas party, so I should be suitably hungover!

Here’s this week’s complete playlist:

Good Day Sunshine – Revolver, The Beatles

The Sound Of Sunshine – The Sound Of Sunshine, Michael Franti and Spearhead

Ray of Your Sunshine – Nothing Left to Burn, Christian Pyle

Sunshine Of Your Love – Eric Clapton Story, Cream

I Wish I Never Saw The Sunshine – Twentyfourseven Soundtrack, Beth Orton

Black Hole Sun – Time To Begin, Katie Noonan

You Are The Sunshine Of My Life – Ballad Collection, Stevie Wonder

Sunny – Rhythm & Blues, Bobby Hebb

Sunshine Superman [Extended] – Try For The Sun, Donovan

Sunny Afternoon – Lost And Found 1962-1969, The Kinks

Solar – Chet In Chicago, Chet Baker

Here Comes The Sun – The Very Best Of Nina Simone, Nina Simone

Sun Is Shining – Bob Marley Collection, Bob Marley

Ain’t No Sunshine – Lean On Me: Priceless Collection, Bill Withers

Tomorrow – Elaine Paige LIVE , Elaine Paige

Tequila Sunrise – The Very Best Of The Eagles, The Eagles

The Warmth Of The Sun – Shut Down Volume 2, The Beach Boys

Blister In The Sun – Violent Femmes, Violent Femmes

Walking On Sunshine – Sounds Of The Eighties: 1985, Katrina and The Waves

The Sun Rising – Single File, The Beloved

Sun Dirt Water – Sun Dirt Water, The Waifs

The Sun Ain’t Gonna Shine Anymore –  The Walker Brothers

Don’t Let The Sun Catch You Crying – Gerry & The Pacemakers, Gerry and The Pacemakers

Who Loves The Sun – High Fidelity [Bonus Tracks], The Velvet Underground

Why Does The Sun Shine? – Severe Tire Damage, They Might Be Giants

The Sunshine Drive – Suburban Mayhem Soundtrack, The Spazzys

Waterloo Sunset – The Ultimate Collection [Disc 1], The Kinks

Solar Sex Panel – Little Village, Little Village

Set The Controls For The Heart Of The Sun – A Saucerful Of Secrets, Pink Floyd

Next week:  SONGS ABOUT DRINKING

Listen to Lyn McCarthy at the Theme Park on BayFM, Tuesdays 4-6pm, Sydney time
Also streaming via BayFM
Tragically also on Facebook and Twitter
Email me at: lyn.themeparkradio@gmail.com

LIFE’S LESSONS

You’re born, you learn, you work, you may reproduce and then you die. That’s pretty much it. But being human, we’re designed to question, argue and seek meaning in our life. We don’t all want the same thing: the kind-hearted want an explanation for poverty and suffering; the ambitious try to rise above everyone else and if you’re depressed you may be looking for a reason to even get out of bed in the morning. Yes, life’s a puzzle and I’m not sure that there are any definite answers. But songwriters can’t help themselves. Like all artists they’re fascinated by life’s mysteries.

HAPPY TALK, by jazz greats Nancy Wilson and Cannonball Adderley, is a great example of a Life Lesson song. Yeah, if you don’t have a dream, how are you going to make a dream come true? My dream for the next two weeks, at least, is that our wonderful community radio station, BayFM 99.9, gets as many annual subscriptions as possible because we’re in full Major Subscriber Drive mode at the moment. It made for a really busy show which was also loads of fun.

We got the show moving with one of my favourite artists. It’s a song that has one of the best messages, especially for an optimist like me: YOU CAN GET IT IF YOU REALLY WANT by Jimmy Cliff. Here he is perfoming the song with the Jools Holland Rythymn & Blues Band:

My choice of a Bob Marley song, and there were a few with life lesson lyrics to choose from, was his energetic attack on religions – the ones that neglect to preach “what life is worth”. The song, of course, is GET UP STAND UP.

Bob Dylan has a great life lesson song: DON’T THINK TWICE, IT’S ALRIGHT. Something I didn’t have to thinktwice about was the opportunity to work with Camp Quality over the next two weeks of BayFM’s Subscriber Drive. Camp Quality is a fantastic organisation that supports children suffering from cancer. They believe that laughter is the best medicine and so they aim to bring optimism and  happiness to these children and their families. Jana Ayre, who volunteers for Camp Quality in the Northern Rivers co-hosted the show with me this week, because we had a very special prize for Theme Park listeners who subscribe to the station before August 29th.

Thanks to Possum Creek Eco Lodge in the hinterland of Byron Bay, we are offering a Camp Quality family a respite break. This holiday will be donated in one lucky subscriber’s name and that subscriber then receives the tax deduction for the donation. It’s a fantastic prize, based on kindness and community spirit – and you can’t get better than that!  If you’re reading this and are inspired to subscribe and help keep community radio alive, whether you live in the Northern Rivers or not, just go online to http://www.bayfm.org and follow the prompts. Don’t forget to cite Theme Park as your favourite program!

Someone who did call in during the show to subscribe was a new resident in Byron, David Bridge. And he gets a special mention here because he also requested a terrific life lesson song for the show: UP THE JUNCTION from Squeeze. Thank you David!  Now, this is how to write a complete story about everyone’s life in a little over 3 minutes:

Another goodie from our British songwriters is ON THE EDGE OF A CLIFF from The Streets, known to his Mum as Mike Skinner. Check it out:

I became a big fan of The Drive By Truckers when they appeared at the Byron Blues Festival a couple of years back. I even bought the t-shirt (now that’s commitment!). They do a great Life Lesson song –  most people share the experience described by singer Patterson Hood and his 83-year-old friend on WORLD OF HURT: “To love is to feel pain.” The lesson here, I think, is to accept that pain can also be a positive thing.

De La Soul have a different kind of lesson. They reckon that sometimes you just have to TREAD WATER. They use cartoon creatures to get the message across. Very cute.

SO YOU WANT TO BE A ROCK N ROLL STAR? Well, the Byrds have some advice for you:  All you have to do is get an electric guitar, take some time and learn how to play? Sounds easy enough. But maybe life is like that: Practice makes perfect.

Midway through the show the lovely Gaudi from a new restaurant in Byron, Italian at the Pacific, came in to draw the daily prize for one lucky subscriber. The prize, a day with the chef of the restaurant and dinner for 8 people was won by Craig McGregor whose daughter Claire is a regular contributor to the show (sorry couldn’t fit in Coward of the Country this week Claire!) and another daughter Sarah, a fantastic musician. So I know that this big family will absolutely love this brilliant prize.

THAT LUCKY OLD SUN, by Dean Martin, our weather song for today was suggested by Andrew who also subscribed again this year on Theme Park, so thank you so much for supporting BayFM Andy.

Next up it was a double dose of Ska: Jools Holland and Prince Buster with ENJOY YOURSELF and Dandy Livingstone with RUDY, A MESSAGE TO YOU.

Lots of subscribers ringing in by this stage (thank you one and all!), so I thought a great piece of disco was appropriate ’cause my spirit was uplifted by all the support. The song is one that really speaks to me: YOUNG HEARTS RUN FREE from Candi Staton. Here she is with a 1999 re-recording and video of her 1976 classic:

I think that QUE SERA, SERA (“whatever will be, will be”) has to be the ultimate Life Lesson song, don’t you? Look,  I know that Doris Day pretty much owns this tune but the version we played this week was by Sly & The Family Stone. I was feeling in a funky mood, you see.

One of many suggestions from regular contributor Robyn had to be included, if only because it’s title was perfect: LIFE’S LESSONS from Lynyrd Skynyrd. And then it was one for Frank Zappa fanatic, Hudson: COSMIK DEBRIS:

Our major prize for those subscribing this year is an amazing trip to Broome and the Kimberley region of Western Australia. It’s in conjunction with the environmental group, Save The Kimberley. A great supporter of this cause is musician Xavier Rudd. And a great song with a life lesson, that he does so well, is BETTER PEOPLE.

Robyn had another request for a perfect Life Lesson song: DON’T STOP BELIEVING from Journey. So the least I can do is upload the video clip:

We closed the show with a classic:  “You have to know when to hold em, you have to know when to fold em, know when to walk away, know when to run”. Yep, Kenny Rogers with THE GAMBLER. There was just a little bit of time, too, for a snatch of the Stones with YOU CAN’T ALWAYS GET WHAT YOU WANT. So because we didn’t get to play it all the way through, I’ll give them their due here. Check out a very young David Frost and  an even younger Rolling Stones performing live in 1969:

Thanks to Jana from Camp Quality for coming in and helping host the show this week and to the many listeners who rang to subscribe. Thank you for your support of BayFM, Theme Park and Camp Quality. And if you haven’t subscribed yet, there is still time to get involved in this particular promotion. Just go to the BayFM website at: http://www.bayfm.org and follow the prompts to subscribe. You can also listen to the show online, there, as well.

I’d also love to hear from you with your requests for next week’s show when the topic will be THE ENVIRONMENT. You may be surprised at how many great songs there are on this topic, from all genres. I think this is going to be a very special show.

Here’s this week’s full playlist:

Happy Talk – Nancy Wilson & Cannonball Adderley,

You Can Get It If You Really Want – The Harder They Come, Soundtrack, Jimmy Cliff

Get Up Stand Up – Back To Zion, Bob Marley & The Wailers (incl. Peter Tosh)

Don’t Think Twice, It’s Alright – Best Of Bob Dylan

You’ve Got To Learn – Family/Friends/French Lesson, Nina Simone

Up The Junction – Singles, Squeeze

On The Edge Of A Cliff – Everything Is Borrowed, The Streets

A World Of Hurt – A Blessing And A Curse, Drive By Truckers

Tread Water – Feet High And Rising, De La Soul

So You Want To Be A Rock ‘n’ Roll Star – Byrds/20 Essentia,l The Byrds

That Lucky Old Sun – All Time Greats Vol 3 – The People, Dean Martin (Weather song for this week)

Enjoy yourself – Best Sellers, Jools Holland & Prince Buster

Rudy, A Message To You – This Is Ska!: 16 Original Ska Classics, Dandy Livingstone

Young Hearts Run Free – 54, Vol. 1, Candi Staton

Que Sera Sera (Whatever Will Be Will Be) – Take The Lead (Soundtrack), Sly And The Family Stone

Life’s Lessons – Vicious Cycle, Lynyrd Skynyrd

Cosmik Debris – Apostrophe, Frank Zappa

Better People – White Moth, Xavier Rudd

Don’t Stop Believing – Journey

The Gambler – Kenny Rogers

You Can’t Always Get What You Want – Hot Rocks, 1964-1971 [Disc 2] The Rolling Stones

Next week: THE ENVIRONMENT

Listen to Lyn McCarthy at the Theme Park on BayFM, Tuesdays 4-6pm, Sydney time

Also streaming on http://www.bayfm.org

Tragically also on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/maccalyn

Email me at: lyn.themeparkradio@gmail.com

INSECTS & SPIDERS

Insects and spiders can be an absolute nuisance, especially in summer. They get in our hair, on our skin, even in our beds. They suck our blood and destroy our veggie gardens. But they also keep nature in balance, if we don’t go crazy with insecticides that is. And without those busy little bees we wouldn’t have all that lovely honey. So, like most of the subjects I pick for this show, our relationship with these creeping, crawling, flying and buzzing creatures is a complex one.

James Brown knows what I mean. He’s got ANTS IN HIS PANTS AND HE NEEDS TO DANCE Ouch! A great follow up to that was English soul singer Alice Russell with A FLY IN THE HAND. Here she is performing live in 2008. Great voice.

The B-52s’ song JUNE BUG is about a little beetle that only comes out at night. Sounds like a friend of mine. Lead singer, Fred Schneider, says the song’s message is to “go organic, don’t use pesticides”. Excellent. Loving the sound effects too.

Jason Mraz followed with a nice piece of pop about a BUTTERFLY and then it was Nina Simone with probably the best title for a song this week: FUNKIER THAN A MOSQUITO’S TWEETER. What is a mosquito’s tweeter? I have no idea and neither did any of our listeners when I asked. Anyone who does, please let me know.

The Eels do a great song about relationships, (the love/hate kind), called ANT FARM. And I’ve always loved Carly Simon’s version of ITSY BITSY SPIDER too. Who knew that there could be so many good songs about insects?

The Blues artists know how to make a song on any subject sound provocative. Slim Harpo does it to perfection with the very suggestive I’M A KING BEE. But if you want a funny song about a creepy crawly then you can’t go past country singer Jim Stafford’s rendition of  SPIDERS & SNAKES.

Our hard-working BayFM President, Ros, suggested Ziggy Marley’s DRAGONFLY. Did you know that dragonflies can fly both forward and backward? And they can fly up to 30 miles an hour. Perfect choice for someone who doesn’t ever seem to stay still.

The Who’s BORIS THE SPIDER was written by the band’s bassist John Entwistle. It was supposedly Jimi Hendrix’s favourite Who song. Go figure.

I love the quirkiness of the Presidents of the United States and BOLL WEEVIL is a great example of their crazy novelty punk style. It’s from their self-titled album, released in 1995.

Butterflies have to be one of the most beautiful creatures on earth and they are just so important ecologically, as agents of pollination. So I made sure that there were a few songs about these wonderful flying insects in the show. One of my favourites is by Corrine Bailey Rae. She says that the song BUTTERFLY was written with her Mum in mind.

Another terrific butterfly song is by Chakra Khan. It’s called PAPILLON, which if my schoolgirl French serves me correctly, also means butterfly.

Some butterflies have evolved symbiotic and parasitic relationships with social insects such as ants. So it seemed the right time to introduce Adam Ant with his signature tune, ANTMUSIC.

Louie the Fly introduced a couple of songs about a much maligned little insect:

SHOO FLY PIE AND APPLE PAN DOWDY, by Doris Day, isn’t so much about a fly than about a pie made with molasses. This sticky, sweet substance attracts flies that have to be “shood” away. Tim Buckley’s song BUZZIN’ FLY is also about being attracted to something sweet, but in this case it’s a girl’s affections.

Did you know that the humble cockroach has been around for over 350 million years?

They Might Be Giants, do a very cheeky version of the SPIDER MAN theme song that had to be included. And then it was another suggestion from Andrew, one of the few Theme Park listeners who could come up with a suggestion for this week’s topic.  It was a terrific song that I had totally forgotten: A SONG FROM UNDER THE FLOORBOARDS by Magazine. Here they are performing on the Jools Holland show in 2009:

We definitely needed a bit more Blues in the show, especially as I was giving away a great DVD, RED, WHITE AND BLUES,  part of the 7 part series on the Blues by Martin Scorsese. This part, on the Blues in Britain, was directed by Mike Figgis, director of the film Leaving Las Vegas. Congratulations Mike who won that. Enjoy.

So, looking for more Blues, I couldn’t go past John Lee Hooker’s song about spiders, CRAWLIN’ BLACK SPIDER.

Robyn Hitchcock has a bit of a thing about spiders with both an album and an EP with tarantula in the name, but INSECT MOTHER is actually from his first album with The Egyptians, Fegmania.

Andrew had another great suggestion: Iggy Pop’s LOCO MOSQUITO. Heres a bit of insect trivia for you: Did you know that a mosquito beats its wings an amazing 500 times per second? No wonder I can never catch the little buggers.

The Dire Straits song THE BUG is about how random life is. One minute you’re the windshield, the next you’re the bug. So yeah, live life to the fullest is what I suppose they are suggesting, because you never know when it might all end.

On that note, its only fair that we finished the show on an up note. What better than something from disco diva Tina Charles. She’s been bitten by the best bug of all: THE LOVE BUG.

I’d love to have your suggestions for next week’s show which, as a lead up to my election show the following week, will be on TRUTH AND LIES. I think this has the potential to be a really interesting show, so get your thinking caps on.

For now, here’s this week’s full playlist:

I Got Ants In My Pants -The Big Payback, James Brown

A Fy in the Hand (Remix) – Alice Russell

Junebug – Cosmic Thing, B52s

Butterfly – We Sing, We Dance, We Steal Things, Jason Mraz

Funkier Than A Mosquito’s Tweeter – Nina Simone

Ant Farm – Electro-Shock Blues, Eels

Coming Around Again/Itsy Bitsy Spider –  Greatest Hits Live, Carly Simon

Glow Worm Cha-Cha-Cha – Ultra Lounge, Jackie Davis

I’m A King Bee – Martin Scorsese Presents The Blues, Slim Harpo

Spiders & Snakes –  Jim Stafford

Dragonfly (Live) – Love Is My Religion Re-release, Ziggy Marley

There’s A Change In The Weather (extract to intro Weather update) Preservation Act 1, The Kinks

Boris the Spider – My Generation: The Very Best of the Who,  The Who

Boll Weevil – The Presidents of the United States, The Presidents of the United States

Butterfly – Corinne Bailey Rae, Corrine Bailey Rae

Papillon – The Platinum Collection, Chaka Khan

Antmusic – Antbox 2, Adam Ant

Louie the Fly  (Mortein ad)

Shoo Fly Pie and Apple Pan Dowdy – The Story of Jazz, Doris Day

Buzzin’ Fly – The Dream Belongs To Me, Tim Buckley

La Cucharacha – Born Free, The George Mann Orchestra

Spider Man – They Might Be Giants

A Song from Under the Floorboards – Real Life and Thereafter / Forum, Magazine

Crawlin Black Spider – Boom Boom CD2, John Lee Hooker

Loco Mosquito – The Best of Iggy Pop, Iggy Pop

Insect Mother – Luminous Groove, Robyn Hitchcock And The Egyptians

The Bug – On Every Street, Dire Straits

Love Bug – Greatest Hits, Tina Charles

Next week: TRUTH & LIES

Listen to Lyn McCarthy at the Theme Park on BayFM, Tuesdays 4-6pm, Sydney time

Also streaming on http://www.bayfm.org

Tragically also on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/maccalyn

Email me at: lyn.themeparkradio@gmail.com

SWEETS

SWEETS: luscious lollipops, creamy cakes and pies, rich, dark chocolate and sticky toffees. Don’t pretend that these words don’t fill your mind with naughty thoughts. Yes, everyone knows that when songwriters come over all sweet it can only mean one thing, its “sexy time’.

You may be pleased to know that not all the songs on our playlist were about carnal delights. Having said that, we started the show with Bow Wow Wow’s cover of the Strangeloves I WANT CANDY. There is no doubting the sexual nature of this little ditty. “Candy on the beach, there’s nothing better.” “Someday soon I’ll make him mine and then I’ll have candy all the time.” Come on!

Nina Simone is hanging out for some more of something, and I don’t think its sugar, despite what she sings on the classic Blues track SUGAR IN MY BOWL. Big Maybelle is equally audacious. She reckons her man is just a nice piece of  CANDY.

I’ve definitely got a sweet tooth and, so, I was ecstatic to have Jackie and Renee from Brown Betty’s Bakery into the studio to tell us about their boutique business and to giveaway some mouth-watering goodies. I love Brown Betty’s, not just because they have the best baked goods out, but they really know how to work a theme. It’s 50’s retro:  the girls dress the part, the cakes look and taste delicious. During the show we gave away one of their specialties, the whoopie pie. It’s made of two round mound-shaped pieces of cake (usually chocolate), with a sweet creamy frosting sandwiched between them. It’s an American Amish tradition. According to food historians, Amish women would bake these (known as ‘hucklebucks’ at the time) and put them in farmers’ lunchboxes. When farmers would find these treats in their lunch, they would shout “Whoopie!” How cute is that.

Just for Jackie and Renee I played Dinah Washington’s version of MAKIN WHOOPEE, a case of a song that reverses my premise that all songs about sweet things are really about sex. This is just a song about sex, pure and simple. We followed with the Godfather of funk, Mr James Brown, and a song about another of my favourite treats. The song is called MOTHER POPCORN.

SEX AND CANDY, by Marcy Playground, is a track that doesn’t leave anything to the imagination. No room for innuendo, no sirree. The Four Tops gave us something a little less suspicious:  I CAN’T HELP MYSELF (SUGAR PIE, HONEY BUNCH). This is just one of those songs that puts a smile on your face. And you’ve got to love that.

Iggy Pop has this knack of dueting with the best people. On the track CANDY, he does it again, this time with Kate Pierson from the B-52s.

I try to play a couple of pieces of instrumental in each show, usually as background when we do Community Service Announcements or the local Gig Guide. The two I chose this week were perfect:  First up, Al Hirt with COTTON CANDY, known here in Australia as Fairy Floss. And, of course,  Hot Butter with POPCORN. With the latter, I swear I could not only hear the sound of popcorn popping, I could almost smell it. Mmmmmmm.

I was feeling an insulin rush coming on, so it was time for a little bit of Blues. MY COUNTRY SUGAR MAMA from Howlin’ Wolf was a perfect antidote. He was a big influence on the Rolling Stones so BROWN SUGAR, the opening track on the Rolling Stones album Sticky Fingers, was a perfect follow up. Seemingly about a favourite sweetener, BROWN SUGAR boasts some scandalous lyrics.  It’s essentially a mix of a number of taboo subjects, including interracial sex, cunnilingus, slave rape, sadomasochism, lost virginity and heroin.

That reminds me, I’ll be joining the Midnight Ramblers this Saturday night between midnight and dawn to help present the Rolling Stones All Nighter. So make sure all you night owls tune in then. Should be fun.

And talking of fun, next up it was a couple of guilty pleasures: Spinal Tap with CUPS AND CAKES and then a childhood hero of mine, The Cookie Monster: “What else starts with C. Who cares! C IS FOR COOKIE.

We followed with a French pop song LES SUCETTES. In English that’s LOLLIPOPS. It was written by Serge Gainsbourg and recorded by an 18 year old France Gall in 1966. On the surface, LES SUCETTES is a pleasant children’s song about a girl who likes aniseed-flavoured lollipops. But Gainsbourg’s lyrics are full of playful double meanings referring to oral sex, which Gall says she simply didn’t understand at the time. Well she was 18 and it was 1966. Naughty Serge!

Call me naive, but I like to think that the next song we played really is innocent. It’s Mille Small’s MY BOY LOLLIPOP. We paired that with the antithesis of innocent: Madonna, with some help from Pharrell, claiming that she’s a one-stop CANDY SHOP. I, for one, believe her.

If you’re looking for a real sugar hit you can’t go past Aqua with CANDYMAN, Jimmy Gilmer and the Fireballs with SUGAR SHACK or The Undertones with MARS BARS. Christina Aguilera broke things up somewhat with her rendition of CANDYMAN and then it back to more bubblegum pop with Mika singing LOLLIPOP. Cute animation in this clip at least:

Jonathan Richman & the Modern Lovers play with my head, in a good way. Certainly the track ICE CREAM MAN seems to be designed to make radio presenters pay attention. It has at last 4 or 5 false endings, but I’m proud to say he didn’t fool me!

All this frivolity needed some tempering. So it was quite a beautiful song, from the very tasty Paolo Nutini, pleading for some CANDY, that did the trick.

The always brilliant Tom Waites contributed CHOCOLATE JESUS and then it was one for all my loyal listeners who have been asking me why I don’t play Roy Orbison, at least as regularly as I used to. Yes, very remiss of me. To fill the void, I chose CANDY MAN. We followed with The Beatles and SAVOY TRUFFLE, a song written by George Harrison about Eric Clapton’s huge sweet tooth.

We closed the show with a a song about a guy whose all upset ’cause “someone left the cake out in the rain.” “He just can’t take it cause it took so long to make it and he’ll never have that recipe again.” Sounds like a bad night on Masterchef doesn’t it? No, it’s MACARTHUR PARK written by the great Jimmy Webb and sung by esteemed actor Richard Harris.

Thanks to Renee and Jackie from Brown Betty’s Bakery for the giveaway of the Whoopee Pies and to everyone who contacted me during the week to say how much they enjoyed last week’s show on UNLIKELEY COVERS.

My sister is having a birthday next Tuesday, so to celebrate, the show next week will be on SISTERS AND BROTHERS. Love to hear from you with your suggestions.

Here’s this week’s full playlist:

I Want Candy – Bow Wow Wow

Sugar In My Bowl – Live And Kickin’, Nina Simone

Candy – Candy Disc 1, Big Maybelle

Makin’ Whoopee – The Very Best Of Dinah Washington

Mother Popcorn, Pt. 1 – 20 All-Time Greatest Hits!, James Brown

Sex And Candy – Marcy Playground

I Can’t Help Myself (Sugar Pie, Honey Bunch) – The Four Tops

Candy (with Kate Pierson of B-52s) – Iggy Pop

Cotton Candy – Al Hirt

Sugar, Sugar – Billboard Top 100 Of 1969, The Archies

My Country Sugar Mama – The Real Folk Blues-More Real, Howlin’ Wolf

Brown Sugar – Hot Rocks, 1964-1971 [Disc 2], The Rolling Stones

Cups And Cakes – This Is Spinal Tap, Spinal Tap

C is for Cookie – The Cookie Monster

Les Sucettes – France Galle

My Boy Lollipop – Millie Small

Candy Shop – Hard Candy, Madonna

Candyman – Aqua, Aqua

Sugar Shack – Rock’n’Roll Love Songs, Jimmy Gilmer & The Fireballs

Mars Bars – The Best Of: Teenage Kicks, The Undertones

Candy Man – Back To Basics, Christina Aguilera

Lollipop – Life In Cartoon Motion, Mika

Popcorn – Hot Butter

Ice Cream Man – Best of Jonathan Richman & The Modern Lovers, The Modern Lovers

Candy – Paolo Nutini

Chocolate Jesus – Tom Waits

Candy Man – The Essential Roy Orbison (Disc 1), Roy Orbison

Savoy Truffle – The Beatles (White Album) [Disc 2], The Beatles

MacArthur Park – His Greatest Performances, Richard Harris

Next week: SISTERS & BROTHERS

Listen to Lyn McCarthy at the Theme Park on BayFM, Tuesdays 4-6pm, Sydney time

Also streaming on http://www.bayfm.org

Tragically also on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/maccalyn


CHANGE

Theme Park is now in Drive Time! I’m very excited, (explanation points aside, can you tell?). To celebrate, the topic this week was CHANGE. There were songs about every possible variety of change: political, social, cultural, emotional, physical, even the kind you find at the bottom of your handbag when you most need it.

BayFM is now in its Winter season and with Theme Park’s new time of Tuesdays 4-6pm, you may have only just discovered us. So, if this is your first visit, the idea is not to find a list of the “best” songs on a subject, because “best” is boring and more or less just involves me reaffirming how great the Beatles, Radiohead and Roy Orbison are.  No, what we’re trying to create is a thematically coherent playlist with a mix of genres, eras and moods. Some songs you’ll already know; some, maybe, you won’t, and hopefully each week we’ll rediscover the classics, and discover new music, together.

We opened the show with Michael Jackson’s MAN IN THE MIRROR. And what a great message it is: if you want to change the world then start with yourself and your attitude to those less fortunate than yourself. We followed with something a little less serious: the great Ella Fitzgerald with ANYTHING GOES from her album ‘The Cole Porter Songbook’. It was the first album she recorded for the Verve album in 1956.

John Mayer is in Australia at the moment and I’ll forgive his indiscretions in recent interviews because WAITIN’ ON THE WORLD TO CHANGE is such a great track. Here he is with an acoustic version of the song. Very nice.

We followed with the  definitive cover of Bob Dylan’s ALL ALONG THE WATCHTOWER by Jimi Hendrix. Dylan wrote this song at a time that he was experiencing a complete life change, with two young children and a growing interest in the Bible. Hendrix’s version is so highly regarded that Dylan has been quoted as saying: “I liked Jimi Hendrix’s record of this and ever since he died I’ve been doing it that way… Strange how when I sing it, I always feel it’s a tribute to him in some kind of way.”

Everyone’s allowed to change their mind now and again. A couple of terrific songs about the subject are the Cardigans’ ERASE/REWIND and soul singer Tyrone Davis’ CAN I CHANGE MY MIND?

A completely different perspective on change came from the band Blind Melon. The track CHANGE is from their 1992 self-titled debut album and was the first written by lead singer Shannon Hoon, who struggled with a drug dependancy. The song encourages you to change your life when it gets too hard. Unfortunately Hoon found it difficult to take his own advice and he died in 1995, at 28, from an overdose. His grave is inscribed with words from the song.

Do you think money changes you? According to Cyndi Lauper MONEY CHANGES EVERYTHING. Aretha Franklin, on the other hand, reckons MONEY WON’T CHANGE YOU. I think Aretha may have won that round.

Daniel Merriwether received a little bit of help from, rapper, Wale in the song CHANGE. The song and, in fact, the whole album was produced by wunderkid Mark Ronson. Rather than just play the official video clip, here’s a ‘making of’ that you might find interesting.

Country rockers, The Allman Brothers Band, sound as if they have hit rock bottom and are ready to do something about it in the very bluesy CHANGE MY WAY OF LIVING.

Another great rock group is Muse. The song FEELING GOOD is probably best known for Nina Simone’s outstanding recording.  Here, Muse take the optimism of Simon’s standard to a whole other place.

We rounded out the hour with THE REVOLUTION WILL NOT BE TELEVISED. Recorded in 1971, it’s a poem and a song by Gil Scott-Heron, generally considered to be the father of hip-hop and neo soul.

I’M COMING OUT is a joyous disco number from Diana Ross. Nile Rodgers and Bernard Edwards, of the 70’s Disco band ‘Chic’, wrote and produced the track. Rodgers got the idea for the song when he went to a transvestite club in New York City. He went to the bathroom, and while he was standing at the urinal, he saw three men who were all dressed as Diana Ross.

I love my R&B. Anyone who saw Sharon Jones and the Dap Kings at the Blues Fest a few years ago know what a dynamic group they are. A great song from them is SOMETHING’S CHANGED. We followed with A CHANGE IS GONNA COME. Sam Cooke’s Dylan-inspired, lump-in-the-throat protest song mourns both racial intolerance and his infant son’s fatal drowning. And it’s the most requested song in our list today.

Joni Mitchell’s song BIG YELLOW TAXI is about changes brought about by so-called ‘progress’; “they paved paradise and put up a parking lot.” Sound familiar? And a big shout out to everyone in Mullumbimby, while we’re on the subject of unnecessary change.

David Bowie’s song CHANGES is one you must have predicted. And I’m nothing, if not predictable. We followed with another very predictable track: THE TIMES THEY ARE A CHANGIN’,  although it’s not Bob Dylan but a wonderful version by Nina Simone.

Let’s talk physical change. Can you get any better than Lou Reed’s TAKE A WALK ON THE WILD SIDE? It’s from the Transformer album, recorded in 1972 and produced by David Bowie. “Plucked her eyebrows on the way, shaved her legs and then he was a she.” Yep, that’s what I call change.

Talking of changing teams, Eric Clapton and Steve Winwood contributed a track from their Live From Madison Square Garden album, called, appropriately, TEAM CHANGES. And then it was time to head back to a song about political change: Tracey Chapman with TALKIN’ BOUT A REVOLUTION.

John Legend got some help from Snoop Dogg on I CAN CHANGE. That’s for the right girl,  he asserts. Yeah yeah, heard it all before Johnny.

The Audreys do a gorgeous cover of the INXS song DON’T CHANGE. It challenges you not to change. Because you’re perfectly OK as you are, you know. The song is from the album, Between Last Night and Us. Here they are performing at Woodford Folk Festival, 2009:

We closed the show with a beauty: the Beatles and ACROSS THE UNIVERSE. “Nothings going to change my world.” Well, maybe, but one thing I do know is that change is inevitable and while we might not appreciate it at the time, its all good.

Next week’s theme will be MORE CRED WHEN DEAD. Yes, every track will be from an artist who has passed on to that big disco in the sky and more than likely became more successful after they were gone. Big list to choose from, so inevitably there will be some omissions. But let me know your requests anyway. Love to hear from you.

Here’s this week’s playlist. From this week, I’ll include the album names as well. You can find all songs on iTunes.

Man in the Mirror – Bad, Michael Jackson

Anything Goes – The Cole Porter Songbook (CD1), Ella Fitzgerald

Waiting on the World to Change – Continuum, John Mayer

All Along The Watchtower – The Ultimate Experience, Jimi Hendrix

Erase/Rewind – Gran Turismo, The Cardigans

Can I Change My Mind – Billboard Top 100 Of 1969, Tyrone Davis

Change – Blind Melon, Blind Melon

Money Changes Everything – Twelve Deadly Cyns, Cyndi Lauper

Money Won’t Change You – Lady Soul,  Aretha Frankin

Change – Love & War, Daniel Merriweather (and Wale)

Change My Way of Living – Where It All Begins, The Allman Brothers Band

Feeling Good – The Best of Muse CD2, Muse

The Revolution Will Not Be Televised – The Breaks II, Gil Scott-Heron

I’m Coming Out – Floorfillers 80s Club Classics CD3 – Diana Ross

Something’s Changed – 100 Days, 100 Nights,  Sharon Jones and the Dap-Kings

A Change Is Gonna Come – The Man & His Music, Sam Cooke

Big Yellow Taxi – Ladies of the Canyon, Joni Mitchell

Changes – Hunky Dory, David Bowie

The Times They Are a Changin’ – Forever Young, Gifted & Black, Nina Simone

Take a Walk on the Wild Side – Transformer Lou Reed

Team Changes – Live From Madison Square Garden Cd1, Eric Clapton, Steve Winwood

Talkin’ Bout a Revolution – Tracy Chapman, Tracy Chapman

I Can Change feat. Snoop Dogg – Get Lifted, John Legend

Don’t Change – Between Last Night and Us, The Audreys

Across The Universe – Let It Be, The Beatles

Next week: MORE CRED WHEN DEAD

Listen to Lyn McCarthy at the Theme Park on BayFM, Tuesdays 4-6pm, Sydney time

Also streaming on http://www.bayfm.org

Tragically also on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/maccalyn


LISTS

In my opinion, a ‘list’ song, if it’s genuine, should feature at least half a dozen items. In compiling this week’s playlist I didn’t feel it was good enough to include songs that simply rattled off one number after another or letters of the alphabet, although place names and girl’s names did get a bit of a look in. So it was a bit of a challenge, but that’s what makes it so much fun.

We opened the program with the Bonzo Dog Doo-Dah Band’s spoof of band leader introductions, INTRO & OUTRO, in which each instrument is played by an unlikely public figure: “Looking very relaxed, Adolf Hitler on vibes. Nice.” I couldn’t find a video clip of the original song but here are the Bonzos performing a version with the cast of the pre-Python show, “Do Not Adjust Your Set”, 1967-1969:

That song set a pretty high benchmark for the rest of the show. The only thing to do was to take a completely different direction and consequently it was a couple of R&B standards: Sam Cooke with WHAT A WONDERFUL WORLD and The Temptations with THE WAY YOU DO THE THINGS YOU DO.

Bob Dylan’s  SUBTERRANEAN HOMESICK BLUES is a lively example of the list song if ever there was one. I’ve played this before and also posted the video clip, so let’s don’t do that again. Instead let’s have a look at feminist electro-punk trio Le Tigre, who pay tribute to dozens of female visual artists, musicians, writers, feminists and others who have inspired them, in HOT TOPIC.

Just to stir things up, we followed with UK group Pop Will Eat Itself with CAN U DIG IT. It’s a list of their favourite things including disco, comic books, AC/DC and the Twilight Zone. Somehow I don’t think that Le Tigre and PWEI should ever meet.

In the 40’s & 50’s list songs were sophisticated affairs, delivered with polite confidence. There’s no better example than Sarah Vaughan singing THEY CAN’T TAKE THAT AWAY FROM ME. Vaughan died 10 years ago this week. Jazz commentator Scott Yanow described her as having “one of the most wondrous voices of the 20th century” and I couldn’t agree more.

John Lennon wasn’t concerned with being polite on his 1971 recording of GIMME SOME TRUTH. In fact, just the opposite, as he expressed frustration with deceptive politicians at the time of the Vietnam War: “short-haired, yellow bellied sons of Tricky Dicky”. It’s from the Imagine album. Here’s an extract of the documentary on the making of the album, featuring GIMME SOME TRUTH:

It’s also the 10th anniversary of Ian Dury’s death (on March 27th).  He was a master of the ‘list’ song. Hard to choose, but decided to go with REASONS TO BE CHEERFUL (Part 3). If ever there was a tune that encapsulated Durie”s love for jazz, rock & vaudeville and his collaborator Chaz Jankel’s love of funk, then this is it. Here’s an extended version performed live in 1985.

If you are ready to ditch someone from your life, it was probably time to take a few notes from Simon & Garfunkle as they explained about the  50 WAYS TO LEAVE YOUR LOVER.

If you’re looking for a female perspective on the subject then Carole Bayer Sager is your girl. She’s in total control as she tells her ex-lover YOU’RE MOVING OUT TODAY. Lucinda Williams goes one step further. She’s CHANGED THE LOCKS:

Two more of the great jazz and blues singers are Etta James and Nina Simone. We played James’ THESE FOOLISH THINGS REMIND ME OF YOU and Simone’s AIN’T GOT NO, I GOT LIFE.

LOSING MY EDGE was LCD Soundsystem’s first single in 2002 and was born out of James Murphy’s horror at realising that he was being branded ‘cool’. It’s laugh out loud funny in my books and, not to mention, has a great vinyl list to cross check your ‘coolness’ against:

“But have you seen my records? This Heat, Pere Ubu, Outsiders, Nation of Ulysses, Mars, The Trojans, The Black Dice, Todd Terry, the Germs, Section 25, Althea and Donna, Sexual Harrassment, a-ha, Pere Ubu, Dorothy Ashby, PIL, the Fania All-Stars, the Bar-Kays, the Human League, the Normal, Lou Reed, Scott Walker, Monks, Niagra, Joy Division, Lower 48, the Association, Sun Ra, Scientists, Royal Trux, 10cc, Eric B. and Rakim, Index, Basic Channel, Soulsonic Force (“just hit me”!), Juan Atkins, David Axelrod, Electric Prunes, Gil! Scott! Heron!, the Slits, Faust, Mantronix, Pharaoh Sanders and the Fire Engines, the Swans, the Soft Cell, the Sonics, the Sonics, the Sonics, the Sonics.”

Moving back in time it was Wilson Pickett with LAND OF 1,000 DANCES and a track that I held back from my HAIR show last week because it was so perfect for this theme, BALD-HEADED LENA from Piano Red, later known as Dr. Feelgood. And to round out the triple play, it was Screamin’ Jay Hawkins with a recipe, which of course is nothing but a list. The song: ALLIGATOR WINE.

The Queens of the Stone Age delivered FEEL GOOD HIT OF THE SUMMER. Apart from the single word “and”, their salute to stimulants is nothing but a list, performed with the enthusiasm of those who know of what they speak. Unlike myself of course. Here’s the official clip with a nice piece of animation.

If you’re after something a little more highbrow, and also quite funny, then you can’t go past Divine Comedy with BOOKLOVERS. It lists over 70 different authors for you. Names that live forever.

Here’s a beauty – Monty Python with a song that asserts that all of the great philosophers were drunks – BRUCE’S PHILOSOPHY SONG. Here they are performing at the Hollywood Bowl. Hilarious.

And now for something completely different: Antonio Carlos Jobim with Elis Regina singing the Brazilian classic AGUAS DE MARCO, an impressionistic flood of nouns representing the journey of life towards death. The title is translated as WATERS OF MARCH. Here’s a link to a very good blog that will tell you more about ‘Tom’ Jobim and will also give you the English version of the lyrics: http://leftbankpress.blogspot.com/2006/02/aguas-de-marco-waters-of-march.html

And, from me (and YouTube, of course), a clip of the duo performing the song live:

Having put you in a Latin mood, it was time for some Latin fusion and the next number would surely have had you up and dancing. Lou Bega’s MAMBO NUMBER 5. Can you believe that it was Australia’s #1 single in 1999?

As we were heading towards the end of the program it was great to get my dose of Roy Orbison by including The Travelling Wilburys in the show. George Harrison, Jeff Lynne, Bob Dylan, Tom Petty and Roy Orbison made up the super group. Legends, one and all, they contributed  an interesting little ditty called DIRTY WORLD, with Bob Dylan on lead vocals. And then it was time for two other ex-Beatles with songs about LISTS: Paul McCartney and Wings with LET EM IN and, how could we leave out John Lennon’s GIVE PEACE A CHANCE?

Billy Joel defended the Baby Boomer generation with his hit WE DIDN’T START THE FIRE. As the song goes: “We didn’t start the fire. It was always burning since the world was turning.” Well, yeah, but …

We closed the show with REM’s IT’S THE END OF THE WORLD AS WE KNOW IT (AND I FEEL FINE). Inspired by Bob Dylan’s SUBTERRANEAN HOMESICK BLUES, the track is known for its quick flying lyrics taking the form of what appears to be a stream of consciousness. Michael Stipe says that he wrote the song after dreaming that he was at a birthday party where all the other guests had the initials L.B. hence “Leonard Bernstein, Leonid Brezhnev, Lenny Bruce and Lester Bangs, birthday party, cheesecake, jelly bean, boom!”

And on that note it was fini. Next week the theme will be FRIENDS & NEIGHBOURS, so get your thinking caps on. And try to avoid themes for sit-coms. Yes, it’s going to be harder than it looks.

Here’s the complete playlist for this week:

Intro And The Outro – Bonzo Dog Doo-Dah Band

What A Wonderful World – Sam Cooke

The Way You Do The Things You Do – The Temptations

Subterranean Homesick Blues – Bob Dylan

Hot Topic – Le Tigre

Can U Dig It – Pop Will Eat Itself

They Can’t Take That Away From Me – Sarah Vaughan

Night Train – James Brown

Gimme Some Truth – John Lennon

Reasons To Be Cheerful (Part 3) – Ian Dury and The Blockheads

Fifty ways to leave your lover – Simon & Garfunkel

You’re Moving Out Today – Carol Bayer Sager

Changed The Locks (Live) – Lucinda Williams

These Foolish Things (Remind M – Etta James

Ain’t Got No I Got Life – Nina Simone

Losing My Edge – LCD Soundsystem

Land Of 1000 Dances – Wilson Pickett

Bald-Headed Lena – Piano Red (Dr. Feelgood)

Alligator Wine – Frenzy Screamin’ Jay Hawkins

Feel Good Hit of the Summer – Queens of the Stone Age

The Booklovers – Divine Comedy

Bruce’s Philosophers song – Monty Python

Aguas de Março –  Elis Regina & Antonio Jobim

Mambo No.5 – Lou Bega

Dirty World – Traveling Wilburys

Let ‘Em In – Paul McCartney & Wings

Give Peace A Chance – John Lennon

We Didn’t Start the Fire – Billy Joel

It’s the End of the World As We Know It (And I Feel Fine) – R.E.M.

Next week: FRIENDS & NEIGHBOURS

Listen to Lyn McCarthy at the Theme Park on BayFM, Tuesdays 2-4pm, Sydney time

Also streaming on http://www.bayfm.org

Tragically also on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/maccalyn

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