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MUSICAL ROYALTY

The Royal Family have been attracting a fair bit of attention lately. Kate and Wills got married, Fergie is in detox and, according to her ex-chef, the Queen likes wholemeal toast for dessert. Riveting stuff.

All this just made me think about artists with a royal sounding name. Much more interesting, I’m sure you’ll agree.  We opened the program with a track suggested by one of the Saturday Blues boys. Ken directed me to a fantastic album called The Duke Meets the Earl. It features two virtuoso blues guitarists, Duke Robillard and Ronnie Earl. The whole album is a cracker but I chose a track that’s indicative of how my week’s been going so far: LOOKIN’ FOR TROUBLE. I couldn’t find a clip of both artists performing the song together, but here’s Duke Robillard filmed at Callahan’s in November 2010:

Carol King has written a lot of great pop songs and she’s still going strong. Her 1962 hit IT MIGHT AS WELL RAIN UNTIL SEPTEMBER was originally a demo that turned out so well the record company decided to release it. Smart move.

Nat King Cole and Ella Fitzgerald do a great version of STORMY WEATHER. Ella was often referred to as “Lady Ella” and you can’t get a more royal sounding name than Nat King Cole, can you?  And then it was something completely different. Princess Superstar with LIFE IS BUT A DREAM. And congrats to the Princess who this week gave birth to a baby girl! Happy Mother’s Day.

OK, he may not actually have King in his name, but we all know who we’re talking about when we refer to ‘The King’: Elvis Presley of course. BURNING LOVE went out to Faye. “Lord Almighty, I feel my temperature rising, higher higher, it’s burning through to my soul …”

Sharon Jones and the Dap Kings  JUST DROPPED IN TO SEE WHAT CONDITION MY CONDITION WAS IN. Thanks Sharon. Doing fine.  Considering all the trouble I’m in.

King Curtis’ MEMPHIS SOUL STEW is an ode to musicians of all kinds. Check out Jerry Jermott on bass. Amazing.

I like a bit of diversity in the playlist, so I included an indie pop group from Sweden called Acid House Kings with WOULD YOU SAY STOP? It’s from their latest album Music Sounds Better With You. What is it about the Swedes and their pop music?

My Kings of Leon pick was a great song:  CALIFORNIA WAITING. Check out Caleb’s Prince Valentine hairdo on this live performance:

Another artist with a royal sounding name is Prince Rogers Nelson, better known simply as ‘Prince’ to us plebs. KISS was followed by  another classic, a gorgeous piece of soul from Ben E  King called STAND BY ME. Ben E King was one of the original Drifters and when he was only 9 years old he was a member of the group The Three Crowns, so there you go, another reason why he should be included as one of our artists with royal sounding names.

We went way back to 1932 with: IT DON’T MEAN A THING IF IT AIN’T GOT THAT SWING by Duke Ellington and his Orchestra with vocals by Ivie Anderson. If, like me, you love your nostalgia, then you must tune in to BayFM on Saturdays from 8am when Jill brings you a fantastic show called MUSICAL KALEIDIOSCOPE.

I went way out on a limb with my next choice: I reckon the inclusion of Jesus and Mary Chain was justified on the basis that Jesus was King of the Jews. Right? Their version of SURFIN’ USA went out to Charlotte.

Now I couldn’t do a show about musicians with royal names without including B.B.King. HAPPY BIRTHDAY BLUES went out to anyone who’s had a birthday recently, but in particular to my friend Cheryl who had a great birthday party on Saturday night (and I’m still recovering!), and David who was sick with the flu on  his birthday. How unfair is that?

Our goodbye track was from a group that I consider rock royalty: Freddy Mercury and Queen with  THESE ARE THE DAYS OF OUR LIVES.

Next week’s show will be on CONCERTS. It can be about attending a performance or actually being on stage. I’m thinking of songs like DAFT PUNK IS PLAYING AT MY HOUSE by LCD Soundsystem. See what you can come up with and get in touch!

Here’s this week’s complete playlist:

Lookin For Trouble –  Ronnie Earl & Duke Robillard
It Might As Well Rain Until September – Carole King
Stormy Weather –  Nat King Cole & Ella Fitzgerald
Life Is But A Dream – Princess Superstar
Burning Love – Elvis Presley
Just Dropped In To See What Condition My Condition Was In – Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings
Memphis Soul Stew – King Curtis
Would you say stop? – Acid House Kings
California Waiting – Kings of Leon
Kiss – Prince
Stand By Me – Ben E. King
It Don’t Mean A Thing If It Ain’t Got That Swing –   Duke Ellington & His Orchestra Feat. Ivie Anderson
Surfin’ USA  – The Jesus & Mary Chain
Happy Birthday Blues – BB King
These Are The Days Of Our Lives – Queen

Next week: SONGS ABOUT CONCERTS

Listen to Lyn McCarthy at the Theme Park on BayFM at the new time of Mondays 1–2pm, Sydney time
Also streaming via BayFM
Tragically also on Facebook and Twitter
Email me at: lyn.themeparkradio@gmail.com

FROM ONE MUSO TO ANOTHER…

Occasionally, a songwriter writes a tune that’s essentially a letter to a musical peer or fellow composer. Sometimes that message is delivered in the form of a tribute and sometimes it’s delivered as an angry diatribe.  Our playlist today features both but, like our opening track JAZZ THING from Gang Starr, most of our songs are marks of respect.

I like to include a little country music every now and again, especially if its by the great Johnny Cash. As a contribution to this week’s playlist, he sings about his country music idol on THE NIGHT HANK WILLIAMS CAME TO TOWN. Punk rockers The Ramones praise the rock artists who preceded them on DO YOU REMEMBER ROCK N ROLL RADIO. And then it was UK group Television Personalities, who are obviously Pink Floyd fans with I KNOW WHERE SYD BARRETT LIVES.

The most familiar soul hit on the airwaves during 1967 was Arthur Conley’s SWEET SOUL MUSIC on which he paid tribute to other great soulmen like Otis Redding and James Brown:

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When it comes to soul, Stevie Wonder knows how much is owed to our jazz legends. SIR DUKE is his tribute to Duke Ellington, the influential jazz legend who died in 1974. He also acknowledges Count Basie, Glenn Miller, Louis Armstrong and Ella Fitzgerald.

In 1980 Dexy’s Midnight Runners appeared out of nowhere, with a sound all their own. Nobody else at the time would have dreamt of producing an impassioned, brass-powered tribute to neglected 1960s soul singer Geno Washington, but they did and they took GENO to #1 in the UK.

Dexy’s Midnight Runners also recorded a version of JACKIE WILSON SAID, but I’m faithful to the original by Van Morrison which had to be part of the list too.

A little more country music was up next with the gorgeous Gillian Welch singing the ELVIS PRESLEY BLUES. This was followed closely by the one and only Ian Dury with his incredible piece of hero worship, SWEET GENE VINCENT. On this video Mick Jones of the Clash joins the band, The Blockheads.  And as Dury quips to Jones: “Listen, we’ve got four chords on this one Michael!” Great band, great song. How does Mick Jones get through this number without once dropping the ciggie from his mouth? Hilarious.

Ian Hunter and Mott the Hoople’s reluctant youth anthem, ALL THE YOUNG DUDES was written by  David Bowie. It namechecks T-Rex and references The Beatles and The Stones. Here they are, (with Bowie on back up!), performing at the Freddie Mercury tribute at Wembley Stadium:

The wonderful Jonathan Richman never disappoints me and he delivers again for this week’s playlist. On his song VELVET UNDERGROUND he even performs a few bars of the Velvet Underground’s Sister Ray in between dispensing eloquent insights into his heroes’ dark magic. How good is that!

Bono says that U2’s song STUCK IN A MOMENT YOU CAN’T GET OUT OF is a tribute to INXS singer Michael Hutchence. According to Bono it’s the conversation he wishes had actually taken place.

John Martyn, who died at a relatively early age himself,  extends a concerned hand to a fading Nick Drake on the devastatingly tender SOLID AIR.


Canadian group Barenaked Ladies recorded a hit song about mental illness that references Beach Boy BRIAN WILSON. And just in case you’re wondering, Brian Wilson does do a version during his own live shows.  And why wouldn’t he? It’s a great song. Fellow Canadian Allanah Myles also had a huge hit with my favourite of all the Elvis tribute songs: BLACK VELVET.


Paul Jones and Dave Kelly honour Blues legend SONNY BOY WILLIAMSON and Neil Young references Johnny Rotten of the Sex Pistols on HEY, HEY, MY MY (Into the Black). The line ‘It’s better to burn out than to fade away’ also became infamous in modern rock after being quoted in Kurt Cobain’s suicide note.

On a cheerier note, The Saw Doctors sing I’D LOVE TO BANG THE BANGLES, which pretty much speaks for itself. If you thought that was a wild proposition, you should take a listen to Bongwater’s NICK CAVE DOLLS. But hang in for the punchline on that one. A perfect follow up to that tune is Adam Ant’s GOODIE TWO SHOES, supposedly a critique of Cliff Richards virtuous and conservative image. “Don’t drink, don’t smoke… what do you do?”

A terrific song from Dory Previn is STONE FOR BESSIE SMITH. It isn’t just about the Blues singer Bessie Smith; it’s primarily about Janis Joplin who paid for Bessie Smith’s headstone but forgot to put anything aside for her own.

Early in his career, David Bowie often wrote about artists he admired, from Lou Reed to Andy Warhol to Iggy Pop. On SONG FOR BOB DYLAN a pre-Ziggy Bowie adopted Dylan’s nasal vocal style in order to pay tribute.

Down By Law also do an excellent tribute to the best rock band in the world:  I WANNA BE IN AC/DC.  Me too guys, me too.

It was hard choosing a song to go out on. Yes, of course there’s American Pie and Losing My Edge and the various spats between Paul McCartney and John Lennon, but in an effort not to be too predictable I’ve chose TUNIC (Song for Karen). Sonic Youth’s Kim Gordon does a beautiful job of casting herself as the tragic Karen Carpenter reporting back from heaven.

I’ve got a marathon effort lined up for the next couple of weeks and I need your help! The playlist next week will start with a song referencing Zero or less and I’ll progressively play songs in numerical order until I run out of ideas. For example I could start with Elvis Costello’s Less Than Zero progress to Yeah yeah yeah’s Zero then Bob Marley’s One Love … you get the idea. Let’s see how far I get. If you help me we could be doing this for weeks! To make it easy to participate I’ll be posting onto the Theme Park Radio Facebook page.

But in the meantime, here’s this week’s complete playlist to peruse:

Jazz Thing – Gang Starr – Moment of Truth

The Night Hank Williams Came To Town – Johnny Cash – The Best Of Johnny Cash

Do You Remember Rock ‘N’ Roll Radio – The Ramones Shrek OST

I Know Where Syd Barrett Lives – Television Personalities And Don’t The Kids Just Love It

Sweet Soul Music – Arthur Conley – 60’s Soul

Sir Duke – Stevie Wonder – Songs In The Key Of Life [Disc 1]

Jackie Wilson Said (I’m In Heaven When You Smile) – Van Morrison

Geno – Dexys Midnight Runners – Searching For The Young Soul Rebels

Elvis Presley Blues – Gillian Welch – Time (The Revelator)

Sweet Gene Vincent – Ian Dury and The Blockheads – The Very Best Of Ian Dury And The Blockheads

Blackbird, Bye Bye – Keith Jarrett, Gary Peacock, Jack DeJohnette – Bye Bye Blackbird

All The Young Dudes – Mott The Hoople – Rock Classics 60’s & 70’s Volume 2

Velvet Underground – Jonathan Richman – I, Jonathan

Stuck In A Moment You Can’t Get Out Of – U2 – The Best Of 1990-2000 & B-Sides CD1

Solid Air – John Martyn – No Little Boy

Brian Wilson – Barenaked Ladies – Barenaked Radio: Easter Special

Sonny Boy Williamson – Paul Jones & Dave Kelly – Live In London

Black Velvet – Alannah Myles – The Very Best of Alannah Myles

Hey Hey, My My (Into The Black) – Neil Young – Rust Never Sleeps (Live)

Goodbye Pork Pie Hat – Charles Mingus – Mingus Ah Um

I’d Love To Kiss The Bangles – The Saw Doctors – Play it Again Sham

Nick Cave Dolls – Bongwater – Box of Bongwater

Goody Two Shoes – Adam Ant – Antics In The Forbidden Zone

Stone For Bessie Smith – Dory Previn – Mythical Kings And Iguanas

Song For Bob Dylan – David Bowie – Hunky Dory

(I Wanna Be In) AC/DC – Down By Law – Windwardtidesandwaywardsails

Tunic (Song For Karen) – Sonic Youth – Goo (Deluxe Edition) [Disc 1]

Next week:  NOUGHT TO WHATEVER (Part 1)

Listen to Lyn McCarthy at the Theme Park on BayFM, Tuesdays 4-6pm, Sydney time
Also streaming via BayFM
Tragically also on Facebook and Twitter
Email me at: lyn.themeparkradio@gmail.com

TRUTH & LIES

We call them fibs, falsehoods, fish stories, tall tales, whoppers but what’s really true is that lies have become almost commonplace, and unfortunately we’ve come to expect them from our electioneering hopefuls. But I won’t lie to you: This week’s show was full of great music, all of it on the subject of Truth & Lies. And its a perfect topic for the lead up to our federal election here in Australia.

So, could I have chosen a better opening song than WOULD I LIE TO YOU from the Eurythmics?

The great Freddy Mercury kept the ball rolling with another song suitable for the upcoming election: THE GREAT PRETENDER:

Clarence Carter delivered a song about people who tell lies behind your back. The song’s called THE BACKSTABBERS. Another kind of liar that we seem to condone is THE CARD CHEAT. The Clash turn the concept of the poker face into a pretty good song.

Aretha Franklin begged us – DON’T PLAY THAT SONG, but we had to anyway. And Little Richard sang his 1967 hit DON’T DECEIVE ME.

Jack Johnson isn’t sure he has the answers or that he wants to know the reason we’re all here on ANYTHING BUT THE TRUTH. And from that we had nowhere else to go than some pure pop with The Go-Gos and their 1981 pop hit, OUR LIPS ARE SEALED.

Eric Clapton, who knows just a little bit about an addict’s self-denial, gave us COCAINE. And we followed with another piece of self-delusion: Mary Gauthier’s I DRINK.

Okkervil River’s POP LIE was followed by a song that spoke to many during the Vietnam War. AMERICAN RUSE was recorded by MC5 in 1969 and it points out the American government’s grand deception during this time. Check out these early punk rockers. Excellent.

Lots of requests for Leonard Cohen this week. So IN MY SECRET LIFE made the list, especially for Robyn, Des, Julie & Waldo. I know its heresy to all you Cohen fans, but I haven’t been one of them. If any of his songs could convert me, however, it would be this one. And I’m a sucker for a quirky video clip:

The song LOLA is about someone who misrepresents their gender and gets the Kinks all in a lather. Better to do what Eric Clapton and Steve Winwood suggest and TELL THE TRUTH, I think.

Feist’s I FEEL IT ALL is the third single from her critically acclaimed 2007 album The Reminder.  It’s basically a love song about how lies can divide. Matchbox 20’s song BED OF LIES can be interpreted as not being who you really are within a relationship, or, just leading a life that’s not true to who you really are.

Regular contributor Robyn suggested a few songs this week but one that I had forgotten and had to include was The Thompson Twins with LIES. Couldn’t help myself and had to follow with The Monkees and I’M A BELIEVER. Take me back to 1966!

John Lennon, and I, have a message for all you politicians: (Just) GIMME SOME TRUTH. Fleetwood Mac, on the other hand,  only have love on their minds and they’d prefer that you TELL ME LIES. Depeche Mode have a similar opinion. They’re convinced that honesty’s not always the best policy on POLICY OF TRUTH. Released in 1990, its from their Violator album.

It was a toss up between The Who’s LA LA LIES and  IT’S NOT TRUE for inclusion this week, but went with the latter. Both songs highly underrated I think.

Love the high-octante performance here from Blondie with LITTLE GIRL LIES. Watch for when Debbie shouts: “Hey I want some back up!” Check out this live performance:

Aussie reggae band Blue King Brown aren’t going to take it no more. At least that’s what they’re saying on the brilliant MOMENT OF TRUTH.

We closed the show with the beautiful voice of up and coming musical star Megan Washington. The song I BELIEVE YOU LIAR is from the recently released album of the same name. Someone to watch for sure.

I’d love to have your suggestions for next week’s show, which will be on LIFE’S LESSONS. Songs that express what life is all about. They will have an element of advice about them, like “You Can’t Always Get What You Want” . Come on, you know you like a challenge.

Here’s this week’s complete playlist:

Would I Lie To You – Be Yourself Tonight, Eurythmics

The Great Pretender – The Very Best of Freddie Mercury Solo, Freddie Mercury

Backstabbers – Tarantino Experience II, Clarence Carter

The Card Cheat – London Calling, The Clash

Don’t Play That Song – Aretha Franklin

Don’t Deceive Me – The Explosive Little Richard, Little Richard

Anything But The Truth – To The Sea,  Jack Johnson

Our Lips Are Sealed – Beauty and the Beat, The Go-Go’s

Cocaine – Eric Clapton

I Drink – Theme Time Radio Hour with Your Host Bob Dylan, Mary Gauthier

Pop Lie -The Stand Ins, Okkervil River

The American Ruse – Back In The USA, MC5

In My Secret Life – Ten New Songs, Leonard Cohen

Lola – Lola vs Powerman, The Kinks

Tell the Truth – Live from Madison Square Garden, Eric Clapton and Steve Winwood

I Feel It All – The Reminder, Feist

Bed of Lies – Mad Season, Matchbox 20

Lies – Classic MTV: Class of 1983, Thompson Twins

I’m A Believer – The Monkeys

Gimme Some Truth – Lennon Disc 2 John Lennon

Tell Me Lies – Fleetwood Mac

Policy of Truth – Depeche Mode

It’s Not True – My Generation Deluxe Edition (Extended Version), The Who

Little Girl Lies – Blondie, Blondie

Moment of Truth – Moment of Truth, Single, Blue King Brown

I Believe You Liar – I Believe You Liar, Washington

Next week: LIFE’S LESSONS

Listen to Lyn McCarthy at the Theme Park on BayFM, Tuesdays 4-6pm, Sydney time

Also streaming on http://www.bayfm.org

Tragically also on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/maccalyn

Email me at: lyn.themeparkradio@gmail.com

DEAD MUSICIANS’ CLUB

I’m writing this with a slight hangover. Last night was BayFM’s trivia fundraiser on the theme of The Dead Musicians Club. Great night had by all. I loved the theme so much that I organised this week’s show around the same topic. And, let’s face it, a little bit of outrageous promotion for the event didn’t hurt either. And if you are wondering, I teamed up with the lovely Andy and we dressed as Sid Vicious & Nancy Spungeon.

Trying to fit all my favourite musicians into the two hour slot was, of course, impossible. But I had a good go at it. First up it was Curtis Mayfield & the Impressions with PEOPLE GET READY. Mayfield died in 1999 after 10 years of ill health due to being paralysed after an onstage accident. His music continues to be part of hip-hop’s DNA. Rappers like Jay-Z and Snoop Dog have sampled his lyrics and its reported that his estate receives five sample requests a month, with each one fetching up to $350,000. So Curtis, or at least his estate, isn’t doing too badly.

In order to fit as many of the artists that I could into the line-up it was necessary to occasionally play a duet. And, I ask you, is there any better than Ella Fitzgerald and Louis Armstrong? Ella died in 1996 and is widely considered one of the supreme interpreters of the Great American Songbook. Louis Armstrong passed away in 1971. His influence extends way beyond jazz music. By the end of his career in the 1960’s, he was widely regarded as a profound influence on popular music in general.The duet I chose was DREAM A LITTLE DREAM OF ME.

Both Buddy Holly and Patsy Cline died in plane crashes and both were very young at the time of their passing. They continue to influence country, rock and pop music to this day. We played LEAVIN’ ON YOUR MIND from Patsy Cline and CRYIN’ WAITIN’ HOPIN’ from Buddy Holly. Oldies, but goodies.

Wilson Pickett was known for his influence on R&B, rock n roll and soul. Is there a better dance floor filler than his rendition of DEVIL WITH THE BLUE DRESS ON? No way.

Two artists who found the fame game just a bit too difficult are Nirvana’s Kurt Cobain and singer/songwriter Nick Drake.  Both committed suicide while still very young.  At the time of Cobain’s death in 1994 he was worth less than $1 million but future royalties have been valued at over $100 million. Drake failed to find a wide audience during his lifetime, however his work has gradually achieved wider notice and recognition. He now ranks among the most influential English singer-songwriters of the last 50 years. He died in 1974. We played Drake’s FRUIT TREE, a request from Anthony, and Nirvana’s COME AS YOU ARE. Here’s a clip of Nirvana performing unplugged in New York in the early 90’s:

Naturally I couldn’t do a show about dead musicians without including Michael Jackson. We chose ROCK WITH YOU from the Off the Wall album. After his death in 2009 Jackson became the best-selling artist of the year, selling over 31 million albums worldwide. He named James Brown “his greatest inspiration”. So it was fitting that we played I FEEL GOOD from Brown as well.  He died on Xmas Day 2006 due to complications from pneumonia.

It’s a myth, you know, that Mama Cass Elliott died chocking on a peanut butter sandwich. The real story is that she died of a heart attack after performing back-to-back concerts in London in 1974. She died in the same flat in Mayfair, (on loan from Harry Nilsson), that the Who’s drummer Keith Moon would die in, a little over four years later. I played Elliot’s great version of the Buddy Holly classic, WORDS OF LOVE and followed with a song for Rolling Stones founder, and multi-instrumentalist, Brian Jones. It’s one that showcased Jones’ skill on the side guitar:  LITTLE RED ROOSTER.

Lynard Skynard came to worldwide recognition in 1973 before three members and one road crew member died in a plane crash in 1977.  Keyboardist Billy Powell died in 2009, aged 56, from a heart attack.  Of its original members, only Gary Rossington remains as part of the present line-up. We followed with another good ol’ Southern boy you may have heard of: cultural icon Elvis Presley with BURNING LOVE.

Bob Marley, who passed away in 1981, had to wait for death to make him a U.S. superstar. The week he was diagnosed with cancer he played Madison Square Garden — opening for the Commodores. Fellow Wailer, Peter Tosh, was on the brink of a successful solo career when he was murdered in 1987. I played the Wailers version of  GET UP, STAND UP, with both Peter Tosh and Bob Marley on the track.

We said goodbye to both Malcolm McLaren and  Sid Vicious with the Sex Pistols’ anthem GOD SAVE THE QUEEN. Here’s what all the fuss was about, way back then:

While punk rock stirred things up, for a while, R&B never went away. Marvin Gaye’s career spanned the entire history of Rhythm & Blues from 50’s doo wop to 80’s contemporary soul. He was murdered by his own father after an argument in 1984.  Otis Redding died in plane crash a month before his biggest hit was released. He was only 26. We listened to Marvin Gaye’s sublime WHAT’S GOIN’ ON followed by the song that would make Otis Redding’s estate worth more money than he ever saw when he was alive – SITTIN ON THE DOCK OF THE BAY.

If we’re talking punk, however, I have to say that my favourite band is The Clash. Lead singer and lyricist for the group, Joe Strummer, died suddenly in 2002 from an undiagnosed congenital heart defect. Highly intelligent and politically pro-active, he was the first artist to make the recording, pressing and distribution of his records carbon neutral. Onya Joe. Check out this clip of LONDON CALLING:

Two great artists who died of cancer are  60’s icon, Dusty Springfield, and the incredible Ray Charles. For Dusty we played the power ballad, YOU DON’T HAVE TO SAY YOU LOVE ME, and for Ray Charles, the very appropriate, HARD TIMES.

I’ve played Johnny Cash’s amazing cover of the Nine Inch Nails track, HURT, before but it couldn’t be left out of a show like this. He recorded it in 2002 and it was one of Cash’s final releases before his death in 2003. The  video for the song is regarded as his epitaph.

One of my sentimental favourites is Freddy Mercury who died of pneumonia resulting from AIDS in 1991. As lead singer of rock group Queen he also composed many of their hits. He had a successful solo career too and I chose one of those recordings for this week’s show: THERE MUST BE MORE TO LIFE THAN THIS.

Another of my favourites is Tim Buckley and one of my favourite albums is his Greetings from LA.  Buckley died at 28 from a drug overdose with nothing more than a guitar, amplifier and a lot of debt to his name. His legacy of 11 albums has rectified that somewhat, I hope. Hard to pick one track but we went with MOVE WITH ME.

Another victim of drug addiction was the pioneering Janis Joplin. She died at 27 from a heroin overdose and one of the last songs she recorded was a birthday greeting for John Lennon. The founder of the Beatles was assassinated in 1980, aged 40. So we started the set with Joplin’s CRY BABY and followed with Lennon’s HOW? from the Imagine album.

And finally, my favourite artist, dead or alive – Roy Orbison with his signature tune, PRETTY WOMAN.  This clip is from the Black & White Night DVD, a great video featuring Orbison and friends including Jackson Browne, T Bone Burnett, Elvis Costello, k.d. lang, Bonnie Rait, J.D. Souther, Bruce Springsteen, Tom Waits and Jennifer Warnes. Heaven. And for all things ‘Roy’ go to the website at: http://www.royorbison.com/

We wrapped the show up  with a great artist who passed away only a couple of days ago, at the ripe old age of 92. Lena Horne helped break down barriers for generations of performers. We played her signature tune, STORMY WEATHER from the 1943 film of the same name. It’s a sizzling performance. I want that movie for my collection!

And we still had time to fit in the very charismatic Jim Morrison and The Doors with RIDERS ON A STORM. Whew. Now I know that there are some glaring omissions. But it’s only a two hour show folks!

Next week I’ve been inspired by some postings on Facebook to create a show on SONGS WITH MEANINGLESS WORDS. Like Na-Na-Hey-Hey and Doo-Ron-Ron. That kind of thing. Love to hear your suggestions.

Here’s this week’s complete playlist:

People Get Ready – The Anthology 1961-1977, Curtis Mayfield & The Impressions

Dream A Little Dream Of Me – Easy Listening, Ella Fitzgerald & Louis Armstrong

Leavin’ On Your Mind – The Patsy Cline Story, Patsy Cline

Cryin’ Waitin’ Hopin’ – Buddy Holly

Devil With The Blue Dress On – Wilson Pickett

Come As You Are – Nirvana, Nirvana

Fruit Tree – Twentyfourseven Soundtrack, Nick Drake

I Feel Good –  James Brown

Rock With You (Single Version) – Off the Wall, Michael Jackson

Words of Love – Mama’s Big Ones, Mama Cass Elliot

Little Red Rooster – Rolling Stones

Summertime – Charlie Parker & Chet Baker

Sweet Home Alabama – Forrest Gump Soundtrack, Lynard Skynard

Burning Love – Elvis Presley

Get Up Stand Up – Back To Zion, Bob Marley & The Wailers

God Save The Queen – Never Mind The Bollocks, The Sex Pistols

What’s Going On – The Big Chill soundtrack,  Marvin Gaye

Sittin’ On The Dock Of The Bay – Otis Redding

London Calling – The Clash

You Don’t Have To Say You Love Me – The British Beat: Best Of The ’60s, Dusty Springfield

Hard Times – Martin Scorsese Presents The Blues, Ray Charles

Hurt – American IV: The Man Comes Around, Johnny Cash

There Must Be More To Life Than This – The Very Best of Freddie Mercury, Freddie Mercury

Fever – Verve Remixed 3,  Adam Freeland & Sarah Vaughan

Move With Me – Greetings From L.A., Tim Buckley

Purple Haze – Experience Hendrix: The Best of Jimi Hendrix, Jimi Hendrix

Cry Baby – Cry Baby (The Ultimate Collection), Janis Joplin

How? –  Lennon,  John Lennon

Oh, Pretty Woman –  Roy Orbison

Stormy Weather – Hollywood Musicals, Lena Horne

Riders on the storm – The Doors soundtrack, The Doors

Next week: SONGS WITH MEANINGLESS WORDS

Listen to Lyn McCarthy at the Theme Park on BayFM, Tuesdays 4-6pm, Sydney time

Also streaming on http://www.bayfm.org

Tragically also on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/maccalyn

MEMORY

Memories can haunt us, no matter how much we want to escape them. There are false memories, conflicting memories of the same event and memories that clash with the reality of the present. Thanks to mass media, memory isn’t something that only belongs to us as individuals. When we see scenes at the cinema or television or on DVDs over and over again, they become part of our collective memory. Even if you’ve never seen the film King Kong you know that there’s a scene where a big gorilla climbs up the Empire State Building with a human girl in his hand. And whenever a comedy show or film features a scene where someone is killed or threatened in a shower most people understand it’s a parody of Psycho. So mass media,  film and television in particular, have contributed hugely to a memory that we share with millions of other people.

Unfortunately, we remember melancholy and pleasure in equal measure. The concept of looking back in hindsight is also a bit complicated. It’s easy to write off youthful idealism as simply being naïve as Stevie Wonder did in our opening number YESTERME, YESTERYOU, YESTERDAY. According to Stevie it was all “a cruel and foolish game we used to play”. Well that’s how he remembers it anyway.

And talking of cruel, I can’t imagine anything worse than getting Alzheimer’s disease and Elvis Costello’s song VERONICA is all about that. It tells the story of an old lady who lives in a nursing home and is gradually losing her memory. It was inspired by Costello’s grandmother.

The Ramones want to know DO YOU REMEMBER ROCK ‘N’ ROLL RADIO? Has it ever gone away?

Collecting objects  that remind us of old times should bring back good memories, but that’s not always the case as Soft Cell tell it in MEMORABILIA. Sarah Vaughan would rather experience something that didn’t work out than never do anything at all in  I’D RATHER HAVE A MEMORY THAN A DREAM. The real classic of this triple play, however, was the Shangri-Las with their ode to a lost love affair: REMEMBER (WALKIN IN THE SAND). Here’s a great clip from the excellent “Songmakers Collection” DVD, with interviews with Mary Weiss and writer producer George ‘Shadow’ Morton about this track and their other hit, LEADER OF THE PACK.

Jurassic 5 dug deep into their memory banks for REMEMBER HIS NAME. As did Fall Out Boy for THNKS FR TH MMRS . The Zutons, REMEMBER ME is about those kind of  friends who seem to forget you once they are entrenched in a romantic relationship. Don’t you just hate that!

THOSE WERE THE DAYS is from Cream’s 1968 album Wheels of Fire. The album cover was designed by Australian artist Martin Sharpe and it won the the New York Art Directors Prize for best album cover in 1969. The sound on the album was characterised by a hybrid of blues, hard rock and psychdelic rock, combined with Eric Clapton’s blues guitar, Ginger Baker’s jazz-influenced drumming and the basslines and voice of Jack Bruce.

One of the most beautiful voices I’ve heard belongs to Sarah McLachlan. And one of my favourite songs of hers is one that I  first heard on the soundtrack to the film The Brothers McMullen. It’s called  I WILL REMEMBER YOU.

Otis Redding’s name is synonymous with the term ‘soul’ and we had to include his classic with I’VE GOT DREAMS TO REMEMBER. Redding died at the very early age of 26 but his memory is kept alive with the Youth Educational Dream Foundation and a very good website. Go to: http://www.otisredding.com/

British group Bloc Party look back regretfully on an opportunity for love that wasn’t realised in I STILL REMEMBER:

The Kinks wonder what ever happened to their childhood friend in  DO YOU REMEMBER WALTER? It’s from their album The Kinks Are the Village Green Preservation Society.

The Supremes reflected on the good and bad memories of a love that used to be in REFLECTIONS while Jimi Hendrix had only good memories of a past love, (he even wants her back!),  in REMEMBER.

Relationships that survive depend partly on shared memories, but those memories need constant topping up.  Indie rockers, Yo La Tengo document this well in OUR WAY TO FALL.

There was a fair bit of nostalgia in this week’s show, (well what did you expect?) and one of my faves was The Platters with REMEMBER WHEN. Also fitting the bill was Elvis Presley who seems somewhat confused in I FORGOT TO REMEMBER TO FORGET.

Memories, daydreams, disconnected thoughts – they fill our minds in a never-ending rush. Our next song, THE WINDMILLS OF YOUR MIND, evoked this beautifully, conveying the incredible weirdness of our thought processes. If you’re after nostalgia then what about Noel Harrison with the original version of the song that served the film The Thomas Crown Affair so well.

Ok back to recent memories. Jack Johnson wonders DO YOU REMEMBER? and P.M. Dawn are SET ADRIFT ON A MEMORY. Thanks to Lynden for suggesting that one and several others on our list today.

One of my favourite films deals with amnesia. Memento, starring Guy Pearce, and directed by Christopher Nolan, is a fascinating story about someone who can’t store new memories. A song about about the subject is I DON’T REMEMBER by Peter Gabriel.

Bob Dylan’s memory song is a love ballad from the Empire Burlesque album: I’LL REMEMBER YOU. And if its nostalgia that you’re after, consider MEMORIES ARE MADE OF THIS from Dean Martin. An oldie but a goodie, as they say.

I’ll never forget Michael Jackson with REMEMBER THE TIME from the Dangerous album. Another sad memory for me is Freddy Mercury singing THOSE WERE THE DAYS OF OUR LIVES which many think was the song he dedicated to his fellow Queen members when he knew that he was dying.

Back to the 70’s and some Aussie based punk rock: remember The Saints and MEMORIES ARE MADE OF THIS?

We closed the show with a cover of a song that I swore I wouldn’t play this week, but this version is so sweet it had to make the cut: The Waifs with a little help from Clare Bowditch. They’re singing Frank Ifields I REMEMBER YOU.

This week’s theme on MEMORY segues nicely into next week’s topic. My computer crashed last week and I had to invest in a drive with a lot more memory to cope with all the songs that I collect for these shows. So next week its MACHINES, ROBOTS AND COMPUTERS. No Television or Radio songs please because you know they are a whole theme to themselves. and no modes of transport, for the same reason.  But any other gadget or gizmo is up for grabs.

Here’s this week’s complete playlist. All songs available on iTunes.

Yesterme Yesteryou Yesterday – Stevie Wonder

Veronica – Elvis Costello

Do You Remember Rock ‘N’ Roll Radio – The Ramones

Memorabilia – Soft Cell

I’d Rather Have a Memory Than a Dream – Sarah Vaughan

Remember (Walkin’ in the Sand) – The Shangri-Las

Remember his name – Jurassic 5

Thnks fr th Mmrs – Fall Out Boy

Remember Me – The Zutons

Those Were The Days – Cream

I Will Remember You – Sarah Mclachlan

I’ve Got Dreams To Remember – Otis Redding

I Still Remember – Bloc Party

Do You Remember Walter – The Kinks

Reflections – Diana Ross & the Supremes

Remember – The Jimi Hendrix Experience

Our Way to Fall – Yo La Tengo

Remember When – The Platters

I Forgot to Remember to Forget – Elvis Presley

Do You Remember – Jack Johnson

The Windmills Of Your Mind – Noel Harrison

Set Adrift On Memory Bliss – P.M. Dawn

I Don’t Remember – Peter Gabriel

I’ll Remember You – Bob Dylan

Memories Are Made Of This – Dean Martin

Remember The Time – Michael Jackson

Memories Are Made of This – The Saints

Those Were The Days Of Our Lives – Queen

Remember You (feat. Clare Bowditch) –  The Waifs

Next week: MACHINES, ROBOTS & COMPUTERS

Listen to Lyn McCarthy at the Theme Park on BayFM, Tuesdays 2-4pm, Sydney time

Also streaming on http://www.bayfm.org

Tragically also on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/maccalyn

FRIENDS & NEIGHBOURS

Figuring out who your friends are used to be pretty straight forward. Rarely did anyone I know have more than a handful of best buddies, but in the age of Facebook there’s nowhere to hide and in ten seconds flat you’ve got yourself hundreds of so-called ‘friends’ in your cyber-social network. At least with neighbours there’s no ambiguity. They either live next door to you or they don’t. Except in Byron Bay where, if you live in a holiday rental area, it’s a traveling circus. But that’s another story.

The risk with doing a show with this theme,of course, is that the songs tend to lean towards the warm and fuzzy, so I’ve made sure that if I have included a little bit of cheese, then its good cheese! The brie of pop, in fact. Personally, I prefer a gritty, more realistic look at friendships, so it was a diverse range of viewpoints that we presented in this week’s show. I also went out of my way to exclude any song that’s been used as a theme for a sit-com or reality tv series. And that was hard I tell you. Goodbye Dandy Warhols, The Rembrandts, Stevie Wonder and others.

We opened the show with some pure pop – the Spice Girls, way back when they really were friends, with WANNABE. Yeah, if you wannabe my lover, you better get on with my friends. Well, it’s a given isn’t it? The official video of the song isn’t that great, but you have to give them credit for a clip made with one continuous shot. Check it out:

The uncomplicated friendships formed at school are the source of a number of songs. The White Stripes with, most possibly, their gentlest track, WE ARE GOING TO BE FRIENDS, was followed by The Clash’s wonderful, yet underrated, STAY FREE – a song written by guitarist Mick Jones about his best mate at school who ended up in prison.

Bill Withers’ LEAN ON ME is a genuine heart-warmer. Some may think its cheesy, but to me it transcends that label and represents one of the classic friendship songs. Corrine Bailey Rae gives a nod to Bob Marley in PUT YOUR RECORDS ON: “three little birds sat on my window and they told me that I don’t need to worry.” A beautiful song about the supportive nature of friendship.

Michelle Shocked song ANCHORAGE is about friendship that’s expressed in letters going back and forth. The song touchingly and poignantly captures the pleasure of discovering a friend’s new life while realizing that life moves on and different paths must be followed.

There were at least three songs from The Beatles that fitted the theme but I chose IN MY LIFE, over the more obvious I GET BY WITH A LITTLE HELP FROM MY FRIENDS. Because I can.

BAD NEIGHBOURHOOD by Ronny & The Delinquents is notable for the fact that the band included Dr John before he became Dr. John. Malcolm Rebennack (his real name), was a guitarist in that band but his career almost came to an end when his left ring finger was injured by a gunshot while he was defending singer/keyboardist Ronnie Barron. After the injury, Rebennack concentrated on bass guitar before making piano his main instrument; pianist Professor Longhair was an important influence on Rebennack’s style.

Pioneering gospel and blues singer Sister Rosetta Tharpe had some good advice: DON’T TAKE EVERYBODY TO BE YOUR FRIEND. While Jerry McCain and His Upstarts had a whinge: MY NEXT DOOR NEIGHBOUR is a very amusing song about a neighbour that can’t stop borrowing stuff.

Not all companionship is welcome. Morrissey comments on the Manchester music scene in WE HATE IT WHEN OUR FRIENDS BECOME SUCCESSFUL. And in ARE ‘FRIENDS’ ELECTRIC? Gary Numan mixes genuine feelings of alienation with Philip K. Dick’s sci-fi fantasies to create a story of a man whose robot buddy has broken down. Awwww.

The Arcade Fire gave us NEIGHBORHOOD #2 from their Funeral album. The song is actually about Laika the first dog to have been sent into outer space, as the song goes,  “for the good of the neighborhood”. Hey, isn’t the dog supposed to be man’s best friend? Quite a sad song, really.

Feeling the the need for some R&B to cheer me up so it was the Four Tops with a message that everyone needs to hear every now and again: REACH OUT I’LL BE THERE. And I never tire of the beautiful voice of Dido singing THANK YOU. Here she is with a fantastic acoustic performance of the song:

Country singers George Jones and Melba Montgomery take neighbourly love to a whole new level with LET’S INVITE THEM OVER. I must admit that today’s show throws a whole new light on our country cousins, doesn’t it?

War wanted to know WHY CAN’T WE BE FRIENDS? and The Lemonheads delivered a brutally honest song about a certain kind of dependent relationship: MY DRUG BUDDY. Here’s Evan Dando performing the track live with Chris Brokaw:

Sheryl Crowe’s song THERE GOES THE NEIGHBOURHOOD won a Grammy award in 2001 for Best Female Rock Performance but failed to chart in America. Go figure.

The Cars got all sooky on us with MY BEST FRIENDS GIRL. Yeah, she used to be mine. Oh well thems the breaks guys. Love and friendship is a complex mix. REO Speedwagon told us (they) HEARD IT FROM MY BEST FRIEND. Oh Oh. Can’t be good news.  But we had a solution that may interest some: Rachel Yamagata tackled the the concept of bonk buddies in SIDEDISH FRIEND. Here she is performing the song on KCRW radio in 2008:

Even our country singer friends like the idea of a bit on the side. Conway Twitty & Loretta Lyn asked WHAT’S A LITTLE LOVE BETWEEN FRIENDS? Indeedy.

The Grateful Dead’s song FRIEND OF THE DEVIL is from their American Beauty album and the song, like most of the album, is acoustic. It is known for the riff lead guitarist Jerry Garcia plays and it’s the most covered of the Dead’s songlist.

Patti Labelle is at her best when she sings YOU ARE MY FRIEND. Great song, great voice, simple as that. Here she is in her very first live video with the bonus of an amazing intro from Debbie Henry. The year was 1991.

Now how many times have you heard someone say, after they’ve broken up with someone, that not only were they losing a lover they were losing their best friend? Blues artist Little Walter bemoaned the fact in LAST NIGHT.

It was time for a mood lifter and a couple of songs about Neighbours gave us just that. The Small Faces song LAZY SUNDAY (“Wouldn’t it be nice to get on wiv me neighbours) was suggested by Beck. Great. A perfect companion piece was the Rolling Stones, who also don’t seem to be getting on with their NEIGHBOURS. Do you think it might have something to do with them being rock bands? Here are the Stones performing live in Tempe Arizona during their 1981 tour:

Love, love, love DEAD END FRIENDS from Them Crooked Vultures, the rock supergroup formed in 2009 by John Paul Jones, (Led Zeppelin), Dave Grohl (Nirvana/Foo Fighters) and Josh Homme (Queens of the Stone Age). Go Dave!

It always make me a little sad to listen to Freddie Mercury who died way too young but I had to include Queen’s YOU’RE MY BEST FRIEND:

Herman’s Hermits  song MY SENTIMENTAL FRIEND sums up a lot of the material in today’s show including our very last song YOU’VE GOT A FRIEND, from Dusty Springfield covering the Carole King standard. That one was for Victoria.

A big thank you to Zoe for helping out with this week’s show.

Next week in the lead up to Anzac Day and the Australian Day of Remembrance, I’m dedicating the show to MEMORY. So, get your thinking caps on and send my your suggestions.

Here’s the playlist:

Wannabe – Spice Girls

We Are Going To Be Friends – The White Stripes

Stay Free – The Clash

Put Your Records On – Corrine Bailey Rae

Lean On Me – Bill Withers

Anchorage – Michelle Shocked

In My Life – The Beatles

Bad Neighbourhood – Ronny & the Delinquents

Don’t Take Everybody To Be Your Friend- Sister Rosetta Tharpe

My Next Door Neighbour – Jerry McCain And His Upstarts

We Hate It When Our Become Successful – Morrissey

Are ‘Friends’ Electric -Gary Numan + Tubeway Army

Neighborhood #2 (Laika)  –  The Arcade Fire

Reach Out I’ll Be There – The Four Tops

Thank You – Dido

Let’s Invite Them Over – George Jones & Melba Montgomery

Why Can’t We Be Friends  – War

My Drug Buddy – The Lemonheads

There Goes The Neighbourhood – Sheryl Crow

My Best Friends Girl – The Cars

Heard It From A Friend – REO Speedwagon

Sidedish Friend – Rachael Yamagata

What’s A Little Love  Between Friends – Conway Twitty & Lorretta Lyn

Friend of the Devil – Grateful Dead

You Are My Friend – Patti Labelle

Last Night –  Little Walter

Lazy Sunday – The Small Faces

Neighbours – The Rolling Stones

Dead End Friends – Them Crooked Vultures

You’re My Best Friend – Queen

My Sentimental Friend – Herman’s Hermits

You’ve Got A Friend – Dusty Springfield

Next week: MEMORY

Listen to Lyn McCarthy at the Theme Park on BayFM, Tuesdays 2-4pm, Sydney time

Also streaming on http://www.bayfm.org

Tragically also on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/maccalyn

DUETS

I had a lot of fun getting this week’s list together because there’s just so much to choose from when it comes to DUETS. We opened with the perfectly pitched IT TAKES TWO from Marvin Gaye & Kim Weston. The hit single was released in 1966 on Motown’s Tamla label.

Iggy Pop and Deborah Harry do an amazing job with WELL DID YOU EVAH. Who would have thought that Cole Porter’s quaint double act from the film High Society,originally sung by Bing Crosby and Frank Sinatra, would be handled so well by two punk icons? Here’s a treat: a video created by director Alex Cox (“Sid & Nancy”), that incorporates some of High Society/Frank & Bing with Iggy and Deb’s version. Great stuff:

We followed with the  hilariously argumentative Otis Redding and Carla Thomas with TRAMP and then some more Marvin Gaye, this time with Tammi Terrell. Until Tammi’s  death from a brain tumour in 1970, she and Marvin Gaye were regarded as Motown’s perfect pairing. Choosing the “best” of Gaye’s duets with Terrell is a little crazy, but I chose REAL THING over the much covered ‘Aint No Mountain High Enough’ which seems to get enough exposure without my help.

Time then for a boy on boy duet: Freddy Mercury and David Bowie’s anxious little melodrama, UNDER PRESSURE.  Born out of an impromptu jam session, it evolved into one of the most inspiring musical moments of the 1980s.

Dusty Springfield and the Pet Shop Boys’ rendition of  WHAT HAVE I DONE TO DESERVE THIS? helped revive Dusty’s career in the U.S. when it was released in 1987. We followed with SOMETIMES ALWAYS from Jim Reid of the Jesus and Mary Chain and his singing partner Hope Sandoval from Mazzy Star. Here’s a clip of them performing live at the MTV studios:

Let’s face it, country music is the spiritual home of the duet.  Two great examples: Nancy Sinatra and Lee Hazlewood with the wonderful and haunting SOME VELVET MORNING and  JACKSON from Johnny Cash and June Carter.

Iggy Pop seems to love to duet. Last week he featured with Peaches and this week he turns up twice; this time with Kate Pierson of the B-52s. The song?  CANDY is the tale of an ex-con reaching out to his lost love after 20 years. It makes brilliant use of Iggy’s sly, world-weary baritone and Pierson’s sunny tones. The result is an modern-rock classic. Take a look:

PJ Harvey and Thom Yorke, of Radiohead, offered up THIS MESS WE’RE IN. It’s kind of what you would expect from these two isn’t it?  Profoundly gloomy and yet impossibly beautiful. Peter Gabriel with Kate Bush aren’t quite as melancholic as she gives Pete some great lifestyle tips on their gorgeous duet DON’T GIVE UP.

Another wonderful duet is COME ON OVER,  from Isobel Campbell (ex Belle & Sebastien) and Mark Langegan (ex Queens of the Stone Age).  Qualifies for probably the sexiest song on the list this week.

The Youssou N’Dour & Neneh Cherry track  SEVEN SECONDS was a huge worldwide hit in 1994. The song is about the first seven seconds in a child’s life, when he or she is totally unaware of the problems and violence in the world. A timeless classic:

Gram Parsons and Emmylou Harris cover Roy Orbison’s LOVE HURTS and do a pretty good job of it but we had to have the real thing and the stand-out duet has to be Roy Orbison and kd lang with, of course, CRYING. Now you didn’t think I’d leave that one out did you?

Another goodie that takes a more optimistic viewpoint of partnerships: Chrissie Hynde performing I’VE GOT YOU BABE with UB40. This cover of Sonny & Cher’s signature tune was recorded in 1985 and reached #1 in the UK that year, as did the original 20 years earlier.

Stevie Nicks and Tom Petty do a great version of STOP DRAGGIN MY HEART AROUND and Tina Turner and Brian Adams aren’t half bad either with their cover of Robert Palmer’s ADDICTED TO LOVE.

We followed with a brilliant triple-play: Ray Charles and Gladys Knight with HEAVEN HELP US ALL from the Genius Loves Company album, the great Jackie Wilson and Laverne Baker with THINK TWICE and Al Green and Lyle Lovett singing FUNNY HOW TIME SLIPS AWAY. Here’s proof positive that white men from Texas do have soul:

Another terrific triple play: Johnny Cash and Bob Dylan with ONE TOO MANY MORNINGS followed by Nick  Cave and Kylie Minogue with WHERE THE WILD ROSES GROW and the piece de resistance, in my book, Jack White and Loretta Lynn with PORTLAND OREGAN from Loretta’s amazing album Van Lear Rose. Love the album, love this song, love this clip:

But when it came to closing the show I couldn’t go past a piece of music that sums up, what has to be, a perfect pairing: Louis Armstrong and Ella Fitzgerald singing DANCING CHEEK TO CHEEK. Recorded in 1957 and accompanied by the Oscar Petersen trio and Buddy Rich on drums, you can’t listen to this song without smiling. As the song goes “Heaven, I’m in heaven….”

Next week’s show falls on the 12th of January – My Birthday!  Yes I’m a Capricorn, just like Elvis, David Bowie, Annie Lennox …. Ah ha, I’m in great company. So in honour of all of us having birthdays, next week’s theme is GOING OUT AND PARTYING. Send me your suggestions.

Thanks for all your support this year. Have a wonderful 2010! Here’s this week’s playlist:

It Takes Two – Marvin Gaye & Kim Weston
Well Did You Evah – Deborah Harry & Iggy Pop
Tramp – Otis Redding & Carla Thomas
Ain’t Nothing Like The Real Thing – Marvin Gaye and Tammi Terrell
Under Pressure – Freddy Mercury & David Bowie
What Have I Done To Deserve This? – Pet Shop Boys & Dusty Springfield
Sometimes Always – The Jesus And Mary Chain (Jim Reid)/Hope Sandoval
Musica Cubana Duo de Pianos – Bebo & Chucho Valdés
Some Velvet Morning – Nancy Sinatra & Lee Hazlewood
Jackson – Johnny Cash & June Carter
Candy – Iggy Pop & Kate Pierson
This Mess We’re In – PJ Harvey & Thom Yorke (of Radiohead)
Don’t Give Up – Peter Gabriel & Kate Bush
Come On Over – Isobel Campbell And Mark Lanegan
Seven Seconds – Youssou N’Dour & Neneh Cherry
Love Hurts – Gram Parsons & Emmylou Harris
Crying – Roy Orbison & kd lang
I Got You Babe – UB40 With Chrissy Hynde
Stop Draggin’ My Heart Around – Stevie Nicks & Tom Petty
Addicted To Love (Live) – Tina Turner/Brian Adams
Think Twice. – Jackie Wilson & Laverne Baker
Funny How Time Slips Away – Al Green & Lyle Lovett
Heaven Help Us All – Ray Charles & Gladys Knight
One Too Many Mornings – Bob Dylan & Johnny Cash
Where The Wild Roses Grow – Nick Cave & Kylie Minogue
Portland Oregon – Jack White/Loretta Lynn
Haunted – Shane MacGowan and Sinead O’Connor
Dancing Cheek to Cheek – Louis Armstrong and Ella Fitzgerald

Next week: GOING OUT AND PARTYING

Listen to Lyn McCarthy at the Theme Park on BayFM, Tuesdays 2-4pm, Sydney time.

Also streaming on http://www.bayfm.org

Tragically also on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/maccalyn


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